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See detailDifferential proteomic analysis of a human breast tumor and its matched bone metastasis identifies cell membrane and extracellular proteins associated with bone metastasis
Dumont, Bruno ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Peulen, Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Proteome Research (2012)

The classical fate of metastasizing breast cancer cells is to seed and form secondary colonies in bones. The molecules closely associated with these processes are predominantly present at the cell surface ... [more ▼]

The classical fate of metastasizing breast cancer cells is to seed and form secondary colonies in bones. The molecules closely associated with these processes are predominantly present at the cell surface and in the extracellular space, establishing the first contacts with the target tissue. In this study, we had the rare opportunity to analyze a bone metastatic lesion and its corresponding breast primary tumor obtained simultaneously from the same patient. Using mass spectrometry, we undertook a proteomic study on cell surface and extracellular protein-enriched material. We provide a repertoire of significantly modulated proteins, some with yet unknown roles in the bone metastatic process as well as proteins notably involved in cancer cell invasiveness and in bone metabolism. The comparison of these clinical data with those previously obtained using a human osteotropic breast cancer cell line highlighted an overlapping group of proteins. Certain differentially expressed proteins are validated in the present study using immunohistochemistry on a retrospective collection of breast tumors and matched bone metastases. Our exclusive set of selected proteins supports the set-up of further investigations on both clinical samples and experimental bone metastasis models that will help to reveal the finely coordinated expression of proteins that favor the development of metastases in the bone microenvironment. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential Regulation of Chondrocyte Metabolism by Oncostatin M and Interleukin-6
Sanchez, Christelle ULg; Deberg, Michelle ULg; Devel, Philippe et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2004), 12(10), 801-10

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of interleukin (IL)-6 and oncostatin M (OSM) added separately or in combination with IL-1beta on human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes in alginate beads. DESIGN: Human ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of interleukin (IL)-6 and oncostatin M (OSM) added separately or in combination with IL-1beta on human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes in alginate beads. DESIGN: Human chondrocytes were isolated from OA cartilage and cultured in alginate beads for 12 days, in the absence or in the presence of increasing amounts of IL-6 (20-500ng/ml) with its soluble receptor or OSM (0.1-10ng/ml) and with or without IL-1beta (1.7ng/ml). Aggrecan (AGG), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), stromelysin-1 [matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-3], tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1beta), IL-6 and IL-8 productions were assayed by specific enzyme amplified sensitivity immunoassays. Prostaglandin (PG)E(2) was measured by a specific radioimmunoassay and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) by a spectrophotometric method based upon the Griess reaction. RESULTS: OSM, but not IL-6, decreased basal AGG and TGF-beta1 synthesis. Although IL-6 stimulated basal TIMP-1 production, it did not significantly modify MMP-3/TIMP-1 ratio. In contrast, 10ng/ml OSM highly increased TIMP-1 production, and decreased by half the ratio MMP-3/TIMP-1. IL-1beta highly stimulated *NO, IL-8, IL-6, MIP-1beta and PGE(2) synthesis but decreased AGG and TGF-beta1 production. Neither IL-6 nor OSM modulated IL-1beta-inhibitory effect on AGG production. IL-6, but not OSM, reversed IL-1beta-induced TGF-beta1 inhibition. At 1-10ng/ml, OSM significantly decreased IL-1beta-stimulated IL-8, MIP-1beta, PGE(2) and *NO production but amplified IL-1beta stimulating effect on IL-6 production. IL-6 had no effect on these parameters. CONCLUSIONS: OSM and IL-6, two glycoprotein 130 binding cytokines, show different activity profiles on OA chondrocytes, indicating that these cytokines could play different roles in the OA disease process. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential regulation of wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein binding to synaptic membranes by cytosolic factors.
Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine ULg; Visanji, Naomi P; Whitehead, Shawn N et al

in BMC Neuroscience (2008), 9

BACKGROUND: Alpha-Synuclein (alpha-syn), a 140 amino acid protein associated with presynaptic membranes in brain, is a major constituent of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD). Three missense ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Alpha-Synuclein (alpha-syn), a 140 amino acid protein associated with presynaptic membranes in brain, is a major constituent of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD). Three missense mutations (A30P, A53T and E46K) in the alpha-syn gene are associated with rare autosomal dominant forms of familial PD. However, the regulation of alpha-syn's cellular localization in neurons and the effects of the PD-linked mutations are poorly understood. RESULTS: In the present study, we analysed the ability of cytosolic factors to regulate alpha-syn binding to synaptic membranes. We show that co-incubation with brain cytosol significantly increases the membrane binding of normal and PD-linked mutant alpha-syn. To characterize cytosolic factor(s) that modulate alpha-syn binding properties, we investigated the ability of proteins, lipids, ATP and calcium to modulate alpha-syn membrane interactions. We report that lipids and ATP are two of the principal cytosolic components that modulate Wt and A53T alpha-syn binding to the synaptic membrane. We further show that 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C16:0 PAF) is one of the principal lipids found in complex with cytosolic proteins and is required to enhance alpha-syn interaction with synaptic membrane. In addition, the impaired membrane binding observed for A30P alpha-syn was significantly mitigated by the presence of protease-sensitive factors in brain cytosol. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that endogenous brain cytosolic factors regulate Wt and mutant alpha-syn membrane binding, and could represent potential targets to influence alpha-syn solubility in brain. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential reinforcement of perching duration in the pigeon : a comparison with differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate key-pecking
Lejeune, Helga ULg; Richelle, Marc ULg

in Behaviour Analysis Letters (1982), 2

Pigeons were required to jump on a perch and sit on it for a specified duration before stepping off, in order to gain access to food. This duration was progressively increased by 1-sec steps. Median ... [more ▼]

Pigeons were required to jump on a perch and sit on it for a specified duration before stepping off, in order to gain access to food. This duration was progressively increased by 1-sec steps. Median response duration approximated the required repsonse duration up to values of 40 or even 50 sec and efficiency remained high. Response duration distribution had sharp peaks and comparable dispersions throughout the critical values range. These results contrast with the performance of the same birds in a conventional differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedule involving a key-peck response. This indicates that pigeons are able to regulate in time their own motor behaviour over much longer time intervals in the case of a perching response than in the case of key-pecking. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential resistance/susceptibility patterns to pneumovirus infection among inbred mouse strains
Bui Tran Anh, Dao; Faisca, Rui-Pedro; Desmecht, Daniel ULg

in American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology (2006), 291

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a prominent cause of airway morbidity in children under 1 yr of age. It is assumed that host factors influence the severity of the disease presentation and thus the ... [more ▼]

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a prominent cause of airway morbidity in children under 1 yr of age. It is assumed that host factors influence the severity of the disease presentation and thus the need for hospitalization. As a first step toward the identification of the underlying genes involved, this study was undertaken to establish whether inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), the murine counterpart of RSV, which has been shown to accurately mimic the RSV disease of children. With this purpose in mind, double-chamber plethysmography and carbon monoxide uptake data were collected daily for 7 days after inoculation of PVM in six inbred strains of mice. In parallel, histological examinations and lung viral titration were carried out from day 5 to day 7 after inoculation. Pulmonary structure/function values reflected the success of viral replication in the lungs and revealed a pattern of continuous variation, with resistant, intermediate, and susceptible strains. The results suggest that SJL (resistant) and 129/Sv (susceptible) strains should be used in crossing experiments aimed at identifying genes controlling pneumovirus replication by the positional cloning approach. Similarly, crossing experiments using BALB/c or C57BL/6 (resistant) and DBA/2 or 129/Sv (susceptible) will allow the identification of the genes involved in the control of pulmonary inflammation during pneumovirus infection. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential responsiveness between broiler and layer embryos upon different doses of L-carnitine administration. 1. Hatchability and blood parameters
Tona, K.; Nouboukpo, K. E.; Willemsen, H. et al

in Archiv Für Geglügelkunde = European Poultry Science = Revue de Science Avicole Européenne (2013), 77(4), 240-246

L-carnitine enhances the transport of long chain fatty acids through mitochondrial membrane. It can be produced by animals' organism from lysine and methionine. However, it was reported that chicken ... [more ▼]

L-carnitine enhances the transport of long chain fatty acids through mitochondrial membrane. It can be produced by animals' organism from lysine and methionine. However, it was reported that chicken embryos have a limited capacity to synthesize L-carnitine. For this study, hatching eggs from Ross and Isa Brown breeders of 35 wk old (600 eggs per line) were used. At d 18 of incubation, eggs from each genotype were divided into 4 groups i.e. control eggs, Saline (injection of saline solution), eggs injected with L-carnitine of 500 μmol (LC500) or 1000 μmol (LC1000). At hatch and 7 d post hatch, blood samples were collected for triglyceride, glucose, total protein, uric acids, triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and corticosterone concentrations determination. Results indicate that hatchability and percentage of chick of optimal quality were higher in Ross than Isa Brown. Overall, layer chicks had higher levels of T4, total protein and uric acid than broiler chicks. With regard to L-carnitine injection, eggs of LC1000 groups had the lowest hatchability and this negative effect was more pronounced in Isa Brown eggs. At hatch and 7 d post-hatch, control chicks had the lowest levels of triglyceride and T3 but the highest levels of T4. At 7 d-old, the highest and the lowest levels of corticosterone were obtained in chicks of LC1000 and LC500 groups, respectively, compared to control and saline groups. In conclusion, L-carnitine administration during embryonic life affected differentially hatchability and blood parameters during post-hatch juvenile growth and this in a dose dependent manner. © Verlag Eugen Ulmer, Stuttgart. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential roles of lipopeptides in plant host defenses and pathogen suppression.
Ongena, Marc ULg; Henry, G.; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Phytopathology (2010), 100

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See detailDifferential roles of lipopeptides(LPs) in plant host defenses and pathogen suppression.
Ongena, Marc ULg; Henry, G.; Jourdan, E. et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailDifferential Seismic Modeling of Stars
Ozel, N.; Mosser, B.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg et al

in Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (2013, December 01)

CoRoT (Convection Rotation and planetary Transits) observations provide the opportunity to study a large sample of stars ranging from the Main Sequence (MS) to the Red Giant Branch. With the large ... [more ▼]

CoRoT (Convection Rotation and planetary Transits) observations provide the opportunity to study a large sample of stars ranging from the Main Sequence (MS) to the Red Giant Branch. With the large increase in the number of stars showing solar-like oscillations, we intend to extract as much information as possible from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) oscillation spectrum, benefiting from comparison with a reference star having similar seismic and fundamental parameters. We propose a differential method to determine stellar properties of solar-like oscillations which we call “differential seismology of stellar twins”. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential sensitivity of two insect GABA-gated chloride channels to dieldrin, fipronil and picrotoxinin
Le Corronch, Hervé; Alix, Philippe ULg; Hue, B

in Journal of Insect Physiology (2002), 48

In the central nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates inhibitory neurotransmission is mainly achieved through activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. Extensive studies have ... [more ▼]

In the central nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates inhibitory neurotransmission is mainly achieved through activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. Extensive studies have established the structural and pharmacological properties of vertebrate GABA receptors. Although the vast majority of insect GABA-sensitive responses share some properties with vertebrate GABAA receptors, peculiar pharmacological properties of these receptors led us to think that several GABA-gated chloride channels are present in insects. We describe here the pharmacological properties of two GABA receptor subtypes coupled to a chloride channel on dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurones of the adult male cockroach. Long applications of GABA induce a large biphasic hyperpolarization, consisting of an initial transient hyperpolarization followed by a slow phase of hyperpolarization that is not quickly desensitized. With GABA, the transient hyperpolarization is sensitive to picrotoxinin, fipronil and dieldrin whereas the slow response is insensitive to these insecticides.When GABA is replaced by muscimol and cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) a biphasic hyperpolarization consisting of an initial transient hyperpolarization followed by a sustained phase is evoked which is blocked by picrotoxinin and fipronil. Exposure to dieldrin decreases only the early phase of the muscimol and CACA-induced biphasic response, suggesting that two GABA-gated chloride channel receptor subtypes are present in DUM neurones. This study describes, for the first time, a dieldrin resistant component different to the dieldrin- and picrotoxinin-resistant receptor found in several insect species. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential signalling through ALK-1 and ALK-5 regulates leptin expression in Mesenchymal Stem Cells
Zeddou, M.; RELIC, Biserka ULg; MALAISE, Olivier ULg et al

in Stem Cells & Development (2012), 21(11), 1948-54

Leptin plays a central role in maintaining energy balance, with multiple other systemic effects. Despite leptin importance in peripheral regulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) differentiation, little ... [more ▼]

Leptin plays a central role in maintaining energy balance, with multiple other systemic effects. Despite leptin importance in peripheral regulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) differentiation, little is known on its expression mechanism. Leptin is often described as adipokine, while it is expressed by other cell types. We have recently shown an in vitro leptin expression, enhanced by glucocorticoids in synovial fibroblasts. Here, we investigated leptin expression in MSC from bone marrow (BM-MSC), cord matrix (UMSC), and primary and dedifferentiated chondrocytes (DCH). Results showed that BM-MSC, but not UMSC, expressed leptin that was strongly enhanced by glucocorticoids. Interestingly, chondrocytes gained leptin expression progressively with dedifferentiation. This dedifferentiation was correlated with downregulation of ALK-5 expression, Smad2 phosphorylation (p-Smad2), and gain of ALK-1 expression and Smad1/5 phosphorylation (p-Smad1/5). TGF-β1 was shown to signal via ALK-5-Smad2/3 and/or ALK-1-Smad1/5 pathways. In BM-MSC, TGF-β1 increased p-Smad2 expression and markedly inhibited endogenous- and glucocorticoidinduced leptin expression, while ALK-5 inhibitor (SB431542) induced and restored this expression. In addition, both prednisolone and <br />SB431542 increased p-Smad1/5 expression. These results suggested ALK-5-Smad2 pathway as inhibitor of leptin expression, while ALK-1-Smad1/5 as activator. Indeed, Smad1 expression silencing induced leptin expression inhibition. Furthermore, prednisolone enhanced the expression of TGF-βRII while decreasing p-Smad2 in BM-MSC and SVF but not in UMSC. In vitro differentiation revealed differential osteogenic potential in SVF, BM-MSC and UMSC that correlates to their leptin expression potential. Our results suggest that ALK-1/ALK-5 balance regulates leptin expression in MSC. It also underlines UMSC as leptin non-producer MSC for cell therapy protocols where leptin expression is not suitable. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential taurine responsiveness to ethanol in high- and low-alcohol sensitive rats : a brain microdialysis study
Quertemont, Etienne ULg; Linotte, Sylvie; De Witte, Philippe

in European Journal of Pharmacology (2002), 444(3), 143-150

Several microdialysis studies have investigated the effects of acute ethanol on extracellular amino acids in various rat brain regions, However, these studies led to conflicting results, suggesting that ... [more ▼]

Several microdialysis studies have investigated the effects of acute ethanol on extracellular amino acids in various rat brain regions, However, these studies led to conflicting results, suggesting that individual differences between rat strains and lines may play an important role. In the present study, high-alcohol sensitive (HAS) and low-alcohol sensitive (LAS) rats were used to investigate the possible relationship between ethanol sensitivity and the concentrations of extracellular amino acids in the nucleus accumbens. Several groups of HAS and LAS rats were injected with either saline or ethanol (1.0, 2.0 or 3.0 g/kg, i.p.) and the concentrations of amino acids in the nucleus accumbens microdialysates were assayed by electrochemical detection. Acute ethanol induced a dose-dependent increase in extracellular taurine concentrations. However, this increase was significantly reduced at 2,0 and 3.0 g,,kg ethanol in HAS rats relative to LAS rats. Since the biological functions of taurine suggest its implication in the reduction of ethanol adverse effects, a higher increase in taurine concentrations may contribute to the lower ethanol sensitivity of LAS rats. Although 2.0 and 3.0 g/kg ethanol did not affect extracellular glutamate concentrations, a significant increase in glutamate was observed after 1.0 g/kg ethanol to HAS rats but not to LAS rats. Such an effect remains unexplained but suggests that discrepancies between the results of previous microdialysate studies may be related to differences in the ethanol sensitivities of various rat strains. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential usage of NF-kB activating signals by IL-1b and TNF-a in pancreatic beta cells
Ortis, Fernanda; Miani, M; Colli, ML et al

in FEBS Letters (2012), 586

The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a induce b-cell death in type 1 diabetes via NF-kB activation. IL-1b induces a more marked NF-kB activation than TNF-a, with higher ... [more ▼]

The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a induce b-cell death in type 1 diabetes via NF-kB activation. IL-1b induces a more marked NF-kB activation than TNF-a, with higher expression of genes involved in b-cell dysfunction and death. We show here a differential usage of the IKK complex by IL-1b and TNF-a in b-cells. While TNF-a uses IKK complexes containing both IKKa and IKKb, IL-1b induces complexes with IKKa only; this effect is achieved by induction of IKKb degradation via the proteasome. Both IKKg and activation of the TRAF6-TAK1-JNK pathway are involved in IL-1b-induced IKKb degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferentialdilatometer und dessen Anwendung bei Untersuchungen über die Entstehung der Alaune
Spring, Walthère ULg

in Berichte der Deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft (1884), XVII

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See detailDifferentially abundant transcripts in PBMC of hospitalized geriatric patients with hip fracture compared to healthy aged controls
Vo, Thi Kim Duy; Godard, Patrice; de Saint-Hubert, Marie et al

in Experimental Gerontology (2011), 46

The abundance of a selection of transcript species involved in in!ammation, immunosenescence and stress response was compared between PBMC of 35 geriatric patients with hip fracture in acute phase (days ... [more ▼]

The abundance of a selection of transcript species involved in in!ammation, immunosenescence and stress response was compared between PBMC of 35 geriatric patients with hip fracture in acute phase (days 2–4 after hospitalization) or convalescence phase (days 7–10) and 28 healthy aged controls. Twenty-nine differentially abundant transcripts were identi"ed in acute phase versus healthy ageing. Twelve of these transcripts remained differentially abundant in convalescence phase, and 22 were similarly differentially abundant in acute phase of geriatric infectious diseases. Seven of these 22 transcripts were previously identi"ed as differentially abundant in PBMC of healthy aged versus healthy young controls, with further alteration for CD28, CD69, LCK, CTSD, HMOX1, and TNFRSF1A in acute phase after geriatric hip fracture and infectious diseases. The next question is whether these alterations are common to other geriatric diseases and/or preexist before the clinical onset of the diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferentiating muscle damage from myocardial injury by meaans of the serum creatinine kinase (CK) isoenzyme MB mass measurement/total CK activity ratio
el Allaf, M.; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg; El Allaf, Dia ULg et al

in Clinical Chemistry (1986), 32(2), 291-5

We immunoenzymometrically measured creatine kinase (CK) isoenzyme MB in extracts of myocardium and in homogenates of five different skeletal muscles. CK-MB concentrations in the former averaged 80.9 ... [more ▼]

We immunoenzymometrically measured creatine kinase (CK) isoenzyme MB in extracts of myocardium and in homogenates of five different skeletal muscles. CK-MB concentrations in the former averaged 80.9 micrograms/g wet tissue; in the skeletal muscles it varied widely, being (e.g.) 25-fold greater in diaphragm than in psoas. CK-MB in skeletal muscles ranged from 0.9 to 44 ng/U of total CK; the mean for myocardium was 202 ng/U. In sera from 10 trauma and 36 burn patients without myocardial involvement, maximum ratios for CK-MB mass/total CK activity averaged 7 (SEM 1) ng/U and 18 (SEM 6) ng/U, respectively. Except for an infant (220 ng/U), the highest ratio we found for serum after muscular damage was 38 ng/U. In contrast, the mean maximum ratio determined in 23 cases of acute myocardial infarction exceeded 200 ng/U. Among seven determinations performed 8 to 32 h after onset of symptoms, each infarct patient demonstrated at least one ratio greater than or equal to 110 ng/U. Ratios observed after infarct were unrelated to treatment received during the acute phase. We propose a CK-MB/total CK ratio of 80 ng/U as the cutoff value for differentiating myocardial necrosis from muscular injury. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferentiation Ability and Oncogenic Potential of Hpv-33- and Hpv-33 + Ras-Transfected Keratinocytes
Gilles, Christine ULg; Piette, Jacques ULg; Peter, W. et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (1994), 58(6), 847-54

Five HPV-33-immortalized and 5 HPV-33 + ras-transfected cell lines were characterized in terms of growth in soft agar, tumorigenic potential in nude mice, p21 expression, morphology and expression of ... [more ▼]

Five HPV-33-immortalized and 5 HPV-33 + ras-transfected cell lines were characterized in terms of growth in soft agar, tumorigenic potential in nude mice, p21 expression, morphology and expression of differentiation markers in organotypic cultures. No striking differences were observed between the HPV-33-immortalized cell lines and their corresponding ras-transfected counterparts as regards their tumorigenicity in nude mice (only one cell line was able to develop tumors in nude mice) or their behavior on lifted collagen gels. However, all the ras-transfected cell lines gave rise to colonies in soft agar while only 2 HPV-33-transfected lines (CK1 and CK4) displayed this property. The 10 cell lines could be divided into 2 groups with respect to their phenotype in monolayer and in organotypic cultures. Lines from group I (CK2, 3, 5 and their ras-transfected homologous lines) shared a typical epithelial phenotype in monolayer and the ability (a) to form an epithelium similar to a CIN-III lesion and (b) to strongly express keratins K1-K10 and involucrin in organotypic cultures. On the other hand, for the lines from group II (CK1, CK4, CK1EJ7 and CK4EJ5), there was a correlation between an elongated phenotype in monolayer and the property (a) to form a structure similar to a microinvasive carcinoma and (b) to express vimentin and keratins K8-K18. These cell lines, exhibiting various transformation-associated alterations, can be considered as an in vitro model representing various stages of HPV-33-associated cervical carcinogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferentiation Among Potyviruses Infecting Sweet Potato Based on Genus- and Virus-Specific Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction
Colinet, Dominique; Nguyen, Minh ULg; Kummert, Jean et al

in Plant Disease (1998), 82(fevrier), 223-229

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See detailDifferentiation between begnin and malignant breast lesions with MR imaging and scintimammography
Servais, Fabienne; Blocklet, Didier; Seret, Alain ULg et al

in Radiology (1997), 205(1), 283

No abstract for this letter.

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See detailDifferentiation between stoichiometric and anticatalytic antioxidant properties of benzoic acid analogues: A structure/redox potential relationship study.
Franck, Thierry ULg; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Robert, Thierry ULg et al

in Chemico-biological interactions (2013), 206(2), 194-203

We investigated the antioxidant activities of some phenolic acid derivatives on a cell free system and on cellular and enzymatic models involved in inflammation. The stoichiometric antioxidant activities ... [more ▼]

We investigated the antioxidant activities of some phenolic acid derivatives on a cell free system and on cellular and enzymatic models involved in inflammation. The stoichiometric antioxidant activities of phenolic acid derivatives were studied by measuring their capacity to scavenge the radical cation 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by stimulated neutrophils. The anticatalytic antioxidant capacity of the molecules was evaluated on the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), an oxidant enzyme present in and released by the primary granules of neutrophils. The ROS produced by PMA-stimulated neutrophils were measured by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and the potential interaction of the molecules with MPO was investigated without interferences due to medium by Specific Immuno-Extraction Followed by Enzyme Detection (SIEFED). The antioxidant activities of the phenolic compounds were correlated to their redox potentials measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and discussed in relation to their molecular structure. The ability of the phenolic molecules to scavenge ABTS radicals and ROS derived from neutrophils was inversely correlated to their increased redox potential. The number of hydroxyl groups (three) and their position (catechol) were essential for their efficacy as stoichiometric antioxidants or scavengers. On MPO activity, the inhibitory capacity of the molecules was not really correlated with their redox potential. Likewise, for the inhibition of MPO activity the number of OH groups and mainly the elongation of the carboxylic group were essential, probably by facilitating the interaction with the active site or the structure of the enzyme. The redox potential measurement, combined with ABTS and CL techniques, seems to be a good technique to select stoichiometric antioxidants but not anticatalytic ones, as seen for MPO, what rather involves a direct interaction with the enzyme. [less ▲]

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