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See detailComplete analytical procedure to assess the response of a frame submitted to a column loss
Huvelle, Clara; Hoang, Van Long ULg; Jaspart, Jean-Pierre ULg et al

in Engineering Structures (2015), 86

The present paper gives a global overview on recent developments performed at the University of Liege on structural robustness of buildings for the specific scenario ‘‘loss of a column’’. In particular, a ... [more ▼]

The present paper gives a global overview on recent developments performed at the University of Liege on structural robustness of buildings for the specific scenario ‘‘loss of a column’’. In particular, a complete analytical method to assess the response of a 2D frame losing statically one of its columns is presented in details. This method is based on the development of alternative load paths in the damaged structure and takes into account the couplings between the different parts of the structure which are differently affected by the column loss. Also, the validation of the developed method through comparison to experimental and numerical evidences is presented. [less ▲]

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See detailComplete bifurcation behaviour of aeroelastic systems with freeplay
Dimitriadis, Grigorios ULg

in Proceedings of the 52nd AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference (2011, April)

Over the last couple of decades, a significant amount of research has been carried out on the aeroelastic behaviour of aeroelastic systems with freeplay. It has been established that such systems can ... [more ▼]

Over the last couple of decades, a significant amount of research has been carried out on the aeroelastic behaviour of aeroelastic systems with freeplay. It has been established that such systems can undergo Limit Cycle Oscillations (LCO), both periodic and aperiodic. It has also been shown that several LCOs can occur at the same flight conditions, depending on initial conditions. A lot of the work has been applied to a pitch-plunge airfoil with a control surface and freeplay in the control rotation spring but, even for this simple model, the complete LCO behaviour has not been calculated. In this work, a combined approach using equivalent linearization, a shooting-based numerical continuation scheme and branch following is used to calculate the full bifurcation behaviour of such a system. It is shown that the primary LCO branches depend on the underlying linear systems but that there are two branching points from which secondary periodic solution branches emanate and wrap themselves around the primary branches. Up to 13 different LCOs can coexist at a single flight condition. The system undergoes Hopf, fold, flip and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations and the proposed solution method can identify and all of them. [less ▲]

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See detailComplete coding sequence of one H9 and three H7 low pathogenic influenza viruses circulating in wild birds in Belgium, 2009-2012
Van Borm, Steven; Rosseel, Toon; Marché, Sylvie et al

in Genome Announcements (2016), 4(3),

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See detailComplete Dna-Sequence Of Yeast Chromosome-Xi
Dujon, Bernard; Esteban, Pf.; Fernandes, L. et al

in Nature (1994), 369(6479),

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See detailA complete fuzzy decision tree technique
Olaru, C.; Wehenkel, Louis ULg

in Fuzzy Sets and Systems (2003), 138(2), 221-254

In this paper, a new method of fuzzy decision trees called soft decision trees (SDT) is presented. This method combines tree growing and pruning, to determine the structure of the soft decision tree, with ... [more ▼]

In this paper, a new method of fuzzy decision trees called soft decision trees (SDT) is presented. This method combines tree growing and pruning, to determine the structure of the soft decision tree, with refitting and backfitting, to improve its generalization capabilities. The method is explained and motivated and its behavior is first analyzed empirically on 3 large databases in terms of classification error rate, model complexity and CPU time. A comparative study on 11 standard UCI Repository databases then shows that the soft decision trees produced by this method are significantly more accurate than standard decision trees. Moreover, a global model variance study shows a much lower variance for soft decision trees than for standard trees as a direct cause of the improved accuracy. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailComplete genome sequence of a novel bovine norovirus: Evidence for slow genetic evolution in genogroup III genotype 2 noroviruses
Mauroy, Axel ULg; Scipioni, A.; Mathijs, E. et al

in Journal of Virology (2012), 86(22), 12449-12450

A new genogroup III genotype 2 bovine norovirus, B309/2003/BE, was entirely sequenced and genetically compared to the original Newbury2/1976/UK strain and to Dumfries/1994/UK, detected in 1976 and 1994 ... [more ▼]

A new genogroup III genotype 2 bovine norovirus, B309/2003/BE, was entirely sequenced and genetically compared to the original Newbury2/1976/UK strain and to Dumfries/1994/UK, detected in 1976 and 1994, respectively. Interestingly, except in welldefined coding regions (N-terminal protein, 3A-like protease, hypervariable region of the capsid protein, and C-terminal part of the minor structural protein), very low genetic differences were noted between the entire genomes of these three strains along a 30-year-long period. It allowed some hypotheses of hotspots of genetic evolution through a low genetic evolution background in genotype 2 genogroup III bovine noroviruses. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. [less ▲]

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See detailComplete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499, a rhizobacterium that triggers plant defences and inhibits fungal phytopathogens
Molinatto, G.; Puopolo, G.; Sonego, P. et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (2016), 238

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499 is a plant beneficial rhizobacterium with a good antagonistic potential against phytopathogens through the release of active secondary metabolites ... [more ▼]

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499 is a plant beneficial rhizobacterium with a good antagonistic potential against phytopathogens through the release of active secondary metabolites. Moreover, it can induce systemic resistance in plants by producing considerable amounts of surfactins. The complete genome sequence of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum S499 includes a circular chromosome of 3,927,922 bp and a plasmid of 8,008 bp. A remarkable abundance in genomic regions of putative horizontal origin emerged from the analysis. Furthermore, we highlighted the presence of genes involved in the establishment of interactions with the host plants at the root level and in the competition with other soil-borne microorganisms. More specifically, genes related to the synthesis of amylolysin, amylocyclicin, and butirosin were identified. These antimicrobials were not known before to be part of the antibiotic arsenal of the strain. The information embedded in the genome will support the upcoming studies regarding the application of B. amyloliquefaciens isolates as plant-growth promoters and biocontrol agents. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailComplete genome sequence of Equid herpesvirus 3
Sijmons, S.; Vissani, A.; Tordoya, M.S. et al

in Genome Announcements (2014), 2

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See detailThe Complete Genome Sequence Of The Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus Subtilis
Kunst, F.; Ogasawara, N.; Moszer, I. et al

in Nature (1997), 390(6657), 249-256

Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are ... [more ▼]

Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large proportion of the genetic capacity is devoted to the utilization of a variety of carbon sources, including many plant-derived molecules. The identification of five signal peptidase genes, as well as several genes for components of the secretion apparatus, is important given the capacity of Bacillus strains to secrete large amounts of industrially important enzymes. Many of the genes are involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, that are more typically associated with Streptomyces species. The genome contains at least ten prophages or remnants of prophages, indicating that bacteriophage infection has played an important evolutionary role in horizontal gene transfer, in particular in the propagation of bacterial pathogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detaila complete insect from the Late Devonian period - supplementary information
Garrouste, Romain; Clément, Gaël; Nel, Patricia et al

in Nature (2012)

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See detailA complete insect from the Late Devonian period
Garrouste, Romain; Clément, Gaël; Nel, Patricial et al

in Nature (2012), 488

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See detailComplete Nucleotide Sequence Of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Chromosome X
Galibert, F.; Alexandraki, D.; Baur, A. et al

in Embo Journal (1996), 15(9),

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (3 ULg)
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See detailA Complete Open-Source Solution for Electromagnetic Field Computation
Geuzaine, Christophe ULg; Dular, Patrick ULg; Remacle, J.-F.

in Proceedings of the 12th IEEE Conference on Electromagnetic Field Computation, CEFC 2006 (2006)

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See detailComplete Resistance to Gonadotropin Hormone Releasing Hormone (Gn-RH) Agonist Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer
Valdes Socin, Hernan Gonzalo ULg; Waltregny, David ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

in European Neuroendocrine Association - Liège, 22-25 septembre 2010 (2010, September)

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See detailCompletely inelastic ball
Gilet, Tristan ULg; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULg; Dorbolo, Stéphane ULg

in Physical Review. E : Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics (2009)

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See detailCompletion of biological networks: the output kernel trees approach
Geurts, Pierre ULg; Touleimat, Nizar; Dutreix, Marie et al

in Proceedings of the the Workshop on Probabilistic Modeling and Machine Learning in Structural and Systems Biology (2006)

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See detailA complex anterior mediastinal mass: demonstration of pericardial haemangioma by dynamic MRI (2003:10b).
NCHIMI LONGANG, Alain ULg; Ghaye, B.; Szapiro, D. et al

in European Radiology (2004), 14(1), 160-3

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See detailThe complex behavior of the satellite footprints at Jupiter: the result of universal processes?
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Badman, Sarah V. et al

Poster (2016, December 14)

At Jupiter, some auroral emissions are directly related to the electromagnetic interaction between the moons Io, Europa and Ganymede on one hand and the rapidly rotating magnetospheric plasma on the other ... [more ▼]

At Jupiter, some auroral emissions are directly related to the electromagnetic interaction between the moons Io, Europa and Ganymede on one hand and the rapidly rotating magnetospheric plasma on the other hand. Out of the three, the Io footprint is the brightest and the most studied. Present in each hemisphere, it is made of at least three different spots and an extended trailing tail. The variability of the brightness of the spots as well as their relative location has been tentatively explained with a combination of Alfvén waves’ partial reflections on density gradients and bi-directional electron acceleration at high latitude. Should this scenario be correct, then the other footprints should also show the same behavior. Here we show that all footprints are, at least occasionally, made of several spots and they all display a tail. We also show that these spots share many characteristics with those of the Io footprint (i.e. some significant variability on timescales of 2-3 minutes). Additionally, we present some Monte-Carlo simulations indicating that the tails are also due to Alfvén waves electron acceleration rather than quasi-static electron acceleration. Even if some details still need clarification, these observations strengthen the scenario proposed for the Io footprint and thus indicate that these processes are universal. In addition, we will present some early results from Juno-UVS concerning the location and morphology of the footprints during the first low-altitude observations of the polar aurorae. These observations, carried out in previously unexplored longitude ranges, should either confirm or contradict our understanding of the footprints. [less ▲]

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