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See detailCommissioning the LBTI for use as a nulling interferometer and coherent imager
Hinz, Phil; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Defrere, Denis ULiege et al

in Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV (2014, July 01)

The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a strategically important instrument for exploiting the use of the LBT as a 22.7 m telescope. The LBTI has two science cameras (covering the 1.5-5 μm ... [more ▼]

The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) is a strategically important instrument for exploiting the use of the LBT as a 22.7 m telescope. The LBTI has two science cameras (covering the 1.5-5 μm and 8-13 μm atmospheric windows), and a number of observing modes that allow it to carry out a wide range of high-spatial resolution observations. Some simple modes, such as AO imaging, are in routine use. We report here on testing and commissioning of the system for its more ambitious goals as a nulling interferometer and coherent imager. The LBTI will carry out key surveys to Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) and an LBTI Exozodi-Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH). The current nulling and coherent imaging performance is described. [less ▲]

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See detailCommissioning-orientated building loads calculations. Application to the CA-MET building in Namur (Belgium).
Adam, Ch.; Andre, Philippe ULiege; Aparecida Silva, Cl. et al

Conference (2004, October)

The parallel use of whole building simulation and monitoring of building energy consumptions (heating, cooling, lighting and other electricity consumptions) represents a potential “high-level” ... [more ▼]

The parallel use of whole building simulation and monitoring of building energy consumptions (heating, cooling, lighting and other electricity consumptions) represents a potential “high-level” commissioning tool in order to verify, either as a one shot campaign or as a continuous process, the correct operation of a building. The most advanced approaches use on-line building simulation to continuously compare the real performance of the building to a base line provided by simulation. In that context, different levels of building loads calculation can be used, ranging from rough methods like eg degree day methods to detailed multizone building simulation. The former methods use aggregated information about the buildings (“global” parameters like the heat loss coefficient for instance) and provide as outputs average quantities (energy consumption for a given average controlled temperature) while the latter require a high number of parameters and deliver very detailed results (hourly evolution of demands in each zone of the building). A major question concerns the suitability of the different approaches in a commissioning context. This papers illustrates the use of different calculation methods (heating and cooling loads) for the particular case of an office building located in Namur (Belgium), which is the object of an intensive re-commissioning activity for several years. Very global methods are used as well as detailed computer simulations using TRNSYS Multizone building types 46 and 56. In the latter case, the model is calibrated using reference periods and can serve as a baseline indicator of the energy consumption in the building. The complexity of the building (300 m long, modular architecture, presence of an atrium-like internal street) required some simplifications in the modelling associated to a specific methodology to extrapolate the results got from the simulation of a relatively small part of the building to the whole picture. The paper will explain the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, the required information and the limits of the results. The potential use of the different calculation levels for the implementation in a continuous commissioning process will be examinated as conclusion of the work. [less ▲]

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See detailCommitments and settlements in the future UK competition law regime
Mattioli, Evi ULiege

in European Competition Law Review (2013), 34(3), 160-168

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See detailCommon agricultural policy and its objectives for sustainable management of natural resources and measures in favor of the climate
Terrones Gavira, François ULiege; Burny, Philippe ULiege; Lebailly, Philippe ULiege

in Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Burny, Philippe; Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra-Malina (Eds.) Agri-environment : perspectives on sustainable development (2012)

The first part of this article is a history of the greening of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The second part focuses on parameters and methodologies to take into account in order to evaluate the ... [more ▼]

The first part of this article is a history of the greening of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The second part focuses on parameters and methodologies to take into account in order to evaluate the costs and the benefits of the future CAP. Finally, the last part of this paper is a discussion about the objectives of the greening and the instruments used to achieve them. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon Agricultural Policy and the environment : are they compatible ?
Burny, Philippe ULiege

in Universitatea "Babes-Boliay" Cluj-Napoca (Ed.) Simpozion national "Contributii stiintifice în tehnologii si echipamente pentru evaluarea si protectia mediului" (2005)

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See detailThe Common Agricultural Policy at the crossroad
Burny, Philippe ULiege

in Gazinsky, Benon (Ed.) European essays. European Union vs. contemporary challenges (2015)

This paper briefly presents the history of the CAP and in some more details the topics of importance which are discussed to define the new CAP.

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See detailThe Common Agricultural Policy in a changing world. Reforming and adjustment
Burny, Philippe ULiege; Gazinski, Benon

in Maluszynska, Ewa; Idczak, Piotr; Mazur, Grzegorz (Eds.) Unia Europejska Wobec Wyzman Przyszlosci. Aspekty spoleczne, gospodarcze I srodowiskowe (2015)

In this work, the authors brief the story of the beginnings of the CAP and achievements and shortcomings of former reforms to deal with present day debate, the need of some changes in the overall approach ... [more ▼]

In this work, the authors brief the story of the beginnings of the CAP and achievements and shortcomings of former reforms to deal with present day debate, the need of some changes in the overall approach and the perspectives of further reforms [less ▲]

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See detailThe Common Agricultural Policy towards 2020
Burny, Philippe ULiege; Habran, Maxime ULiege; Terrones Gavira, François ULiege

in Lorencowicz, Edmund; Uziak, Jacek; Huyghebaert, Bruno (Eds.) VI International Scientific Symposium "Farm Machinery and Processes Management in Sustainable Agriculture" : Symposium Proceedings (2013)

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) defined in the Treaty of Rome and implemented since 1962, has always been under reform, mainly in 1992, 1999, 2003 and 2009. However, after the last enlargements and ... [more ▼]

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) defined in the Treaty of Rome and implemented since 1962, has always been under reform, mainly in 1992, 1999, 2003 and 2009. However, after the last enlargements and the international financial crisis, a new reform was needed for the budget period going from 2014 to 2020. The first ideas were launched by the EU Commissionner for Agriculture, M. Dacian Ciolos, in 2010. After three years of discussions, the political agreement between the Council of Ministers, the EU Parliament and the Commission was reached in June 2013. So, this paper presents the main decisions of this agreement. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon Clays of Foumban area (West Cameroon): Variability, Distribution, Characterization and Potential Applications
Nkalih Mefire, Abiba ULiege

in Journal of African Earth Sciences (in press)

Common clay deposits from five localities in Foumban (West Cameroon) were investigated for their morphological, mineralogical and geochemical properties to determine their potential source rocks and ... [more ▼]

Common clay deposits from five localities in Foumban (West Cameroon) were investigated for their morphological, mineralogical and geochemical properties to determine their potential source rocks and suitability in ceramic product. The analytical results were obtained by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry. Morphologically, an homogeneous clayey layer was found in the upper part of a laterite cover on interfluves, and a clayey heterogeneous hydromorphic material in valleys. They are minerallogically composed of kaolinite (25-84%), illite (0-18%), smectite (0- 31%), and chlorite (0-8 %), associated with quartz (2-44 %), K-feldspars (0-27 %.), plagioclase (0-26%), goethite; (0-9%) with traces of rutile and hematite (≤5 %). The geochemical analysis shows a 115 relative large amount of SiO2 (45-71%), Al2O3 (14-31%), and low Fe2O3 (up to 11 %) suggesting weathering of mainly granitic and rhyolitic parent rocks. Most studied clays could be applied to building ceramic product such as bricks (refractory or not) and tiles. Illite may promote the glassy phase responsible for the densification of the final product. In addition, the relatively high proportion of alkali elements (K2O + Na2O, 6-8%) in some samples from Marom, Koutaba and is responsible for low firing temperature. However the presence of smectite (up to 5 %) limits the application of some Koutaba and Marom clays for ceramic building. The high Fe2O3 contents (> 8 %) in some Bangourain clays implied some pretreatment. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon components of risk and uncertainty attitudes across contexts and domains: evidence from 30 countries
Lefebvre, Mathieu ULiege

in Journal of the European Economic Association (2015), 13(3), 421-452

Attitudes towards risk and uncertainty have been indicated to be highly context-dependent, and to be sensitive to the measurement technique employed. We present data collected in controlled experiments ... [more ▼]

Attitudes towards risk and uncertainty have been indicated to be highly context-dependent, and to be sensitive to the measurement technique employed. We present data collected in controlled experiments with 2,939 subjects in 30 countries measuring risk and uncertainty attitudes through incentivized measures as well as survey questions. Our data show clearly that measures correlate not only within decision contexts or measurement methods, but also across contexts and methods. This points to the existence of one underlying “risk preference”, which influences attitudes independently of the measurement method or choice domain. We furthermore find that answers to a general and a financial survey question correlate with incentivized lottery choices in most countries. Incentivized and survey measures also correlate significantly between countries. This opens the possibility to conduct cultural comparisons on risk attitudes using survey instruments [less ▲]

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See detailCommon components of risk and uncertainty attitudes across contexts and domains: evidence from 30 countries
Lefebvre, Mathieu ULiege

Scientific conference (2014, November 20)

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See detailThe common genetic influence over processing speed and white matter microstructure: Evidence from the Old Order Amish and Human Connectome Projects.
Kochunov, Peter; Thompson, Paul M.; Winkler, Anderson ULiege et al

in NeuroImage (2016), 125

Speed with which brain performs information processing influences overall cognition and is dependent on the white matter fibers. To understand genetic influences on processing speed and white matter FA ... [more ▼]

Speed with which brain performs information processing influences overall cognition and is dependent on the white matter fibers. To understand genetic influences on processing speed and white matter FA, we assessed processing speed and diffusion imaging fractional anisotropy (FA) in related individuals from two populations. Discovery analyses were performed in 146 individuals from large Old Order Amish (OOA) families and findings were replicated in 485 twins and siblings of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The heritability of processing speed was h(2)=43% and 49% (both p<0.005), while the heritability of whole brain FA was h(2)=87% and 88% (both p<0.001), in the OOA and HCP, respectively. Whole brain FA was significantly correlated with processing speed in the two cohorts. Quantitative genetic analysis demonstrated a significant degree to which common genes influenced joint variation in FA and brain processing speed. These estimates suggested common sets of genes influencing variation in both phenotypes, consistent with the idea that common genetic variations contributing to white matter may also support their associated cognitive behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.
Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E. et al

in Nature (2015), 520(7546), 224-9

The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and ... [more ▼]

The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 x 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon Modules Organised by the Greek Military Academies, 2015
Paile, Sylvain ULiege

Report (2015)

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See detailA common mutation (epsilon1267delG) in congenital myasthenic patients of Gypsy ethnic origin
Abicht, A.; Stucka, R.; Karcagi, V. et al

in Neurology (1999), 53(7), 1564-9

OBJECTIVE: Mutation analysis of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit gene in patients with sporadic or autosomal recessive congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). BACKGROUND: The nicotinic ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Mutation analysis of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit gene in patients with sporadic or autosomal recessive congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). BACKGROUND: The nicotinic AChR of skeletal muscle is a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel that mediates synaptic transmission at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction. Mutations in its gene may cause congenital myasthenic syndromes. A recently described mutation in exon 12 of the AChR epsilon subunit (epsilon1267delG) disrupts the cytoplasmic loop and the fourth transmembrane region (M4) of the AChR epsilon subunit. METHODS: Forty-three CMS patients from 35 nonrelated families were clinically classified as sporadic cases of CMS (group III according to European Neuromuscular Centre consensus) and were analyzed for epsilon1267delG by PCR amplification and sequence analysis. RESULTS: The authors report the complete genomic sequence and organization of the gene coding for the epsilon subunit of the human AChR (accession number AF105999). Homozygous epsilon1267delG was identified in 13 CMS patients from 11 independent families. All epsilon1267delG families were of Gypsy or southeastern European origin. Genotype analysis indicated that they derive from a common ancestor (founder) causing CMS in the southeastern European Gypsy population. Phenotype analysis revealed a uniform pattern of clinical features including bilateral ptosis and mild to moderate fatigable weakness of ocular, facial, bulbar, and limb muscles. CONCLUSIONS: The mutation epsilon1267delG might be frequent in European congenital myasthenic syndrome patients of Gypsy ethnic origin. In general, patients (epsilon1267delG) were characterized by the onset of symptoms in early infancy, the presence of ophthalmoparesis, positive response to anticholinesterase treatment, and the benign natural course of the disease. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon Prevalence Of Alanine And Glycine In Mobile Reactive Center Loops Of Serpins And Viral Fusion Peptides - Do Prions Possess A Fusion Peptide
Callebaut, I.; Tasso, A.; Brasseur, Robert ULiege et al

in Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design (1994), 8(2),

Serpin reactive centre loops and fusion peptides released by proteolytic cleavage are particularly mobile. Their amino acid compositions reveal a common and unusual abundance of alanine, accompanied by ... [more ▼]

Serpin reactive centre loops and fusion peptides released by proteolytic cleavage are particularly mobile. Their amino acid compositions reveal a common and unusual abundance of alanine, accompanied by high levels of glycine. These two small residues, which are not simultaneously abundant in stable helices (standard or transmembrane), probably play an important role in mobility. Threonine and valine (also relatively small amino acids) are also abundant in these two kinds of peptides. Moreover, the known 3D structures of an uncleaved serpin reactive centre and a fusion peptide are strikingly similar. Such sequences possess many small residues and are found in several signal peptides and in PrP, a protein associated with spongiform encephalopathies and resembling virus envelope proteins. These properties may be related to the infection mechanisms of these diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailA common reference population from four European Holstein populations increases reliability of genomic predictions.
Lund, M. S.; de Ross, S. P.; de Vries, A. G. et al

in Genetics, Selection, Evolution (2011), 43(1), 43

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Size of the reference population and reliability of phenotypes are crucial factors influencing the reliability of genomic predictions. It is therefore useful to combine closely ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Size of the reference population and reliability of phenotypes are crucial factors influencing the reliability of genomic predictions. It is therefore useful to combine closely related populations. Increased accuracies of genomic predictions depend on the number of individuals added to the reference population, the reliability of their phenotypes, and the relatedness of the populations that are combined. METHODS: This paper assesses the increase in reliability achieved when combining four Holstein reference populations of 4000 bulls each, from European breeding organizations, i.e. UNCEIA (France), VikingGenetics (Denmark, Sweden, Finland), DHV-VIT (Germany) and CRV (The Netherlands, Flanders). Each partner validated its own bulls using their national reference data and the combined data, respectively. RESULTS: Combining the data significantly increased the reliability of genomic predictions for bulls in all four populations. Reliabilities increased by 10%, compared to reliabilities obtained with national reference populations alone, when they were averaged over countries and the traits evaluated. For different traits and countries, the increase in reliability ranged from 2% to 19%. CONCLUSIONS: Genomic selection programs benefit greatly from combining data from several closely related populations into a single large reference population. [less ▲]

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See detailCommon resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury
Williams, Shawniqua; Conte, Mary; Goldfine, Andrew et al

in eLife (2013)

Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known ... [more ▼]

Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known zolpidem responses we identify a distinctive pattern of EEG dynamics that suggests a mechanistic model. In the absence of zolpidem, all subjects show a strong low frequency oscillatory peak ∼6–10 Hz in the EEG power spectrum most prominent over frontocentral regions and with high coherence (∼0.7–0.8) within and between hemispheres. Zolpidem administration sharply reduces EEG power and coherence at these low frequencies. The ∼6–10 Hz activity is proposed to arise from intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal neurons that are passively entrained across the cortex by locally-generated spontaneous activity. Activation by zolpidem is proposed to arise from a combination of initial direct drug effects on cortical, striatal, and thalamic populations and further activation of underactive brain regions induced by restoration of cognitively-mediated behaviors. [less ▲]

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