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See detailComparative evaluation of three heat and moisture exchangers during short-term postoperative mechanical ventilation
Sottiaux, Thierry; Mignolet, Ghislaine ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in CHEST (1993), 104(1), 220-224

This study compared performance of three heat and moisture exchangers (HME) during short-term postoperative mechanical ventilation. Temperature and absolute humidity (AH) were measured at various points ... [more ▼]

This study compared performance of three heat and moisture exchangers (HME) during short-term postoperative mechanical ventilation. Temperature and absolute humidity (AH) were measured at various points of the ventilatory circuit. There was no statistical difference between the groups, regarding ambient and body To, body weight, fraction of inspired oxygen, tidal volume, and respiratory rate. Only the hygroscopic HME (groups 2 and 3) provide adequate conditioning with regard to AH and To of the inspiratory gases. The performance of hydrophobic HME (group 1) was inferior and appears to be unsatisfactory. Indirect evaluation (variations of inspiratory gases and tracheal temperatures, AH of the expired gases) confirmed the superiority of the hygroscopic HME. These data suggest that humidification of inspiratory gases with a hygroscopic HME is a defensible practice during short-term postoperative mechanical ventilation. Performance of hydrophobic HME may be weak and can expose the patient to an unacceptable risk of endotracheal tube occlusion. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative Fe and Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the ferroxidase centres of human H-chain ferritin and bacterioferritin from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.
Toussaint, Louise ULg

in Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry : A Publication of the Society of Biological Inorganic Chemistry (2009), 14(1), 35-49

Iron uptake by the ubiquitous iron-storage protein ferritin involves the oxidation of two Fe(II) ions located at the highly conserved dinuclear ‘‘ferroxidase centre’’ in individual subunits. We have ... [more ▼]

Iron uptake by the ubiquitous iron-storage protein ferritin involves the oxidation of two Fe(II) ions located at the highly conserved dinuclear ‘‘ferroxidase centre’’ in individual subunits. We have measured X-ray absorption spectra of four mutants (K86Q, K86Q/E27D, K86Q/E107D, and K86Q/E27D/E107D, involving variations of Glu to Asp on either or both sides of the dinuclear ferroxidase site) of recombinant human H-chain ferritin (rHuHF) in their complexes with reactive Fe(II) and redoxinactive Zn(II). The results for Fe–rHuHf are compared with those for recombinant Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacterioferritin (DdBfr) in three states: oxidised, reduced, and oxidised/Chelex -treated. The X-ray absorption nearedge region of the spectrum allows the oxidation state of the iron ions to be assessed. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure simulations have yielded accurate geometric information that represents an important refinement of the crystal structure of DdBfr; most metal–ligand bonds are shortened and there is a decrease in ionic radius going from the Fe(II) to the Fe(III) state. The Chelex -treated sample is found to be partly mineralised, giving an indication of the state of iron in the cycled-oxidised (reduced, then oxidised) form of DdBfr, where the crystal structure shows the dinuclear site to be only half occupied. In the case of rHuHF the complexes with Zn(II) reveal a surprising similarity between the variants, indicating that the rHuHf dinuclear site is rigid. In spite of this, the rHuHf complexes with Fe(II) show a variation in reactivity that is reflected in the iron oxidation states and coordination geometries. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative Feeding Ecology of Cardinalfishes (Apogonidae) at Toliara Reef, Madagascar
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Michel, Loïc ULg; Zaeytydt, Esther et al

in Zoological Studies (2017), 56(10), 1-14

Despite their importance in coral reef ecosystem function and trophodynamics, the trophic ecology of nocturnal fishes (e.g. Apogonidae, Holocentridae, Pempheridae) is by far less studied than diurnal ones ... [more ▼]

Despite their importance in coral reef ecosystem function and trophodynamics, the trophic ecology of nocturnal fishes (e.g. Apogonidae, Holocentridae, Pempheridae) is by far less studied than diurnal ones. The Apogonidae (cardinalfishes) include mostly carnivorous species and evidence of trophic niche partitioning among sympatric cardinalfishes is still limited. The present study combines stomach contents and stable isotope analyses to investigate the feeding ecology of an assemblage of eight cardinalfishes from the Great Reef of Toliara (SW Madagascar). δ13C and δ15N of fishes ranged between -17.49‰ and -10.03‰ and between 6.28‰ and 10.74‰, respectively. Both stomach contents and stable isotopes showed that they feed on planktonic and benthic animal prey in various proportions. Previous studies were able to group apogonids in different trophic categories but such a discrimination is not obvious here. Large intra-specific variation in the stomach contents and temporal variation in the relative contribution of prey to diet support that all apogonids should be considered as generalist, carnivorous fishes. However the exploration of the isotopic space revealed a clear segregation of isotopic niches among species, suggesting a high level of resource partitioning within the assemblage. According to low inter-specific variation in stomach content compositions, we argue that the differences in isotopic niches could be driven by variation in foraging locations (i.e. microhabitat segregation) and physiology among species. Our temporal datasets demonstrate that the trophic niche partitioning among cardinalfishes and the breadth of their isotopic niches are dynamic and change across time. Factors driving this temporal variation need to be investigated in further studies. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative fire analysis of steel-concrete composite buildings designed following performance-based and U.S. prescriptive approaches
Elhami Khorasani, Negar; Fang, C.; Gernay, Thomas ULg

in Proceedings of the ASFE '17 Conference (2017, September 08)

Performance-based structural fire design provides a rational methodology for designing modern buildings with cost-effective solutions. However, in the United States, fire design still largely relies on ... [more ▼]

Performance-based structural fire design provides a rational methodology for designing modern buildings with cost-effective solutions. However, in the United States, fire design still largely relies on design at the component level using prescriptive approaches. With performance-based approaches, there is an opportunity to benefit from increased flexibility and reduced cost in the design, but these advantages need to be explicitly described and disseminated to promote this shift in paradigm. In this paper, a comparative analysis is conducted on multi-story steel-concrete buildings designed following performance-based and U.S. prescriptive approaches. The steel-concrete composite structure allows taking advantage of tensile membrane action in the slab during fire, and therefore removing the fire protection on secondary beam elements. The nonlinear finite element software SAFIR is used to model the behavior of the buildings under the standard ASTM fire and a natural fire determined using the two-zone fire model CFAST. The numerical simulations show that performance-based design can be used to achieve the required level of safety currently enforced in the U.S. prescriptive guidelines, while providing an opportunity for cost reduction in fire protection material. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative fluxes of HCO3- and Si from glaciated and non-glaciated terrain during the last deglaciation.
Jones, I. W.; Munhoven, Guy ULg; Tranter, M.

in Tranter, M.; Armstrong, R.; Brun, E. (Eds.) et al Interactions Between the Cryosphere, Climate and Greenhouse Gases (1999)

There is current interest in the riverine fluxes of bicarbonate and Si at the last glacial maximum (LGM), since modelling suggests that these were higher than today (Gibbs and Kump, 1994; Froelich et al ... [more ▼]

There is current interest in the riverine fluxes of bicarbonate and Si at the last glacial maximum (LGM), since modelling suggests that these were higher than today (Gibbs and Kump, 1994; Froelich et al., 1992). If this is the case, removal of atmospheric CO2 by silicate weathering is also likely to have been greater at the LGM (Munhoven and Francois, 1996), so contributing to the lower atmospheric CO2 recorded by ice cores (Barnola et al., 1987). To date, the magnitude of glacial chemical erosion on bicarbonate and Si fluxes at the LGM is poorly quantified, and the locus of the inferred doubled terrestrial Si flux is unknown. This paper aims to provide first estimates of the relative fluxes of bicarbonate and Si fluxes from ice-free and glaciated terrain for five time steps between the LGM (21ka), by extending the modelling approach of Gibbs and Kump (1994) and incorporating new data on glacial solute fluxes (Tranter et al., submitted). [less ▲]

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See detailComparative functional analysis of the human macrophage chitotriosidase
Vandevenne, Marylène ULg; Campisi, Vincenzo ULg; Freichels, Astrid ULg et al

in Protein Science : A Publication of the Protein Society (2011)

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See detailComparative genome organization of vertebrates. The First International Workshop on Comparative Genome Organization.
Andersson, L.; Archibald, A.; Ashburner, M. et al

in Mammalian Genome : Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society (1996), 7(10), 717-34

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See detailA comparative Genome-Wide Association Interaction study using BOOST and MB-MDR algorithms on Ankylosing Spondylitis
Bessonov, Kyrylo ULg

Poster (2013, April 29)

Genome-Wide Association (GWA) studies have gained popularity after the completion of the Human Genome Project and advancement of high-throughput technologies. These studies aim to scan thousands of ... [more ▼]

Genome-Wide Association (GWA) studies have gained popularity after the completion of the Human Genome Project and advancement of high-throughput technologies. These studies aim to scan thousands of genomic variations (e.g., SNPs) for their association to phenotypic variables (i.e. traits), such as disease related phenotypes, with the hope of extracting biologically and clinically relevant information. Understanding of genetic, environmental as well as other components of the disease brings the key insights into disease pathology and approaches us closer to the ultimate goal - personalized medicine. In this work we rely on a minimal GWAI protocol for genome-wide epistasis detection using SNPs, as developed in our lab [6][9]. Using the advanced non-parametric Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MB-MDR) method [1] and BOolean Operation-based Screening and Testing (BOOST) algorithms [4][*] for detection of statistically significant epistatic SNP-SNP interactions, we investigate the effect of exhaustive (BOOST) and non-exhaustive (MB-MDR) marker processing strategies, LD effects, as well as different adjustment schemes for lower-order effects (i.e. epistasis). Our approach was tested on Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) data as provided by the WTCCC2 consortium [1]. AS is a long-term / chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the joints between the spinal bones. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs calming down the immune system inflammatory responses are used as a treatment but there is no permanent cure for AS. The disease has also a strong environmental component and affects 3.5 - 13 per 1,000 people in USA [5] [less ▲]

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See detailComparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Ecological Differentiation in the Genus Carnobacterium.
Iskandar, Christelle F.; Borges, Frederic; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

in Frontiers in Microbiology (2017), 8

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and ... [more ▼]

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and are able to colonize multiple animal-linked habitats. In the current study, Carnobacterium was used as a model genus to elucidate the genetic basis of these colonization differences. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene meta-barcoding data showed that C. maltaromaticum followed by C. divergens are the most prevalent species in foods derived from animals (meat, fish, dairy products), and in the gut. According to phylogenetic analyses, these two animal-adapted species belong to one of two deeply branched lineages. The second lineage contains species isolated from habitats where contact with animal is rare. Genome analyses revealed that members of the animal-adapted lineage harbor a larger secretome than members of the other lineage. The predicted cell-surface proteome is highly diversified in C. maltaromaticum and C. divergens with genes involved in adaptation to the animal milieu such as those encoding biopolymer hydrolytic enzymes, a heme uptake system, and biopolymer-binding adhesins. These species also exhibit genes for gut adaptation and respiration. In contrast, Carnobacterium species belonging to the second lineage encode a poorly diversified cell-surface proteome, lack genes for gut adaptation and are unable to respire. These results shed light on the important genomics traits required for adaptation to animal-linked habitats in generalist Carnobacterium. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative haemodynamic effects of intravenous flecainide in patients with and without heart failure and with and without beta-blocker therapy.
Legrand, Victor ULg; Materne, P.; Vandormael, M. et al

in European heart journal (1985), 6(8), 664-71

The haemodynamic effects of flecainide were compared in three different subsets of patients with documented coronary disease. Ten patients (A) had no heart failure, 5 patients were on beta blockers (B ... [more ▼]

The haemodynamic effects of flecainide were compared in three different subsets of patients with documented coronary disease. Ten patients (A) had no heart failure, 5 patients were on beta blockers (B) and 5 patients had overt heart failure (C). Flecainide was associated with negative inotropic effects that were relatively more pronounced in patients with left ventricular dysfunction: pulmonary wedge pressure increased by 27% in A, by 31% in B and by 42% in C; left ventricular stroke volume and stroke work decreased respectively by 10 and 12% in A, 21 and 19% in B, 26 and 28% in C. Ejection fraction decreased by 9% in A, 13% in B and 20% in C, in relation with an increase in end systolic volume (+9% in A, +10% in B and +5% in C). Absolute changes, however, were not significantly different from one group to another except for the increase of systemic vascular resistance which was more pronounced in C as compared with the other groups. The myocardial depression was also confirmed by the fall in dP/dt that was maximal at the end of injection; dP/dt remained depressed 15 min later despite some improvement. Flecainide thus exerts negative inotropic effects that are maximal at the end of infusion and may be of importance in patients with established left ventricular dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative imaging of the podotrochlear apparatus in the horse
Schneider, Nicole ULg

Master of advanced studies dissertation (2000)

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See detailComparative immunohistochemical study of herpes-simplex and varicella-zoster infections
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Virchows Archiv. A : Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology (1993), 422(2), 121-126

Herpes simplex (HSV) and varicella-zoster (VZV) skin infections share so many histological similarities that distinguishing between them may prove to be impossible. We developed and characterized a new ... [more ▼]

Herpes simplex (HSV) and varicella-zoster (VZV) skin infections share so many histological similarities that distinguishing between them may prove to be impossible. We developed and characterized a new monoclonal antibody, VL8, IgG kappa isotype, directed to the VZV envelope glycoprotein gpI. Immunohistochemistry with VL8 appeared highly sensitive and specific on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies and a clear-cut distinction between HSV and VZV infections was possible. The pattern of VL8 immunolabelling in VZV infections was strikingly different from that found in HSV infections studied with polyclonal antibodies to HSV I and II. Double immunolabelling revealed the VL8 positivity of sebaceous cells, endothelial cells, Mac 387-and CD68-positive monocyte-macrophages, and factor XIIIa-positive perivascular, perineural and interstitial dendrocytes. Intracytoplasmic VL8 labelling of endothelial cells and perivascular dendrocytes was found at the site of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative In Vitro Activity of Amphotericine B, Itraconazole, Voriconazole and Posaconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus
Hayette, Marie-Pierre ULg; Amadore, Agatha; Seidel, Laurence ULg et al

Poster (2001, December)

Background. New azoles have been successfully used as treatment of invasive aspergillosis. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro activity of posaconazole (Posa) with that of amphotericin B ... [more ▼]

Background. New azoles have been successfully used as treatment of invasive aspergillosis. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro activity of posaconazole (Posa) with that of amphotericin B (AmB), itraconazole (Itra) and voriconazole (Vor) against A. fumigatus isolates according to NCCLS method (M38-P), and to compare visual and spectrophotometric readings for MIC determination. Methods. A total of 106 A. fumigatus isolates were selected as follows: 88 clinical isolates from colonized patients, 18 from patients with invasive aspergillosis and 7 environmental isolates. Their in vitro susceptibility was evaluated by the NCCLS microdilution method (M38-P) in RPMI 1640 medium. Determination of results was made by visual and spectrophotometric readings (630 nm) after 48 hours incubation at 35 degreesC. Three A. fumigatus reference strains (IHEM 5734, 6149 and 13935) were included as control. Results. 1. Geometric mean MICs/MIC90 (microg/ml) obtained by visual reading were respectively 0.66/1 (AmB), 0.37/0.5 (Itra), 0.27/0.5 (Vor) and 0.02/0.03 (Posa). 2. MIC values were comparable by spectrophotometric and by visual readings for all antifungal agents tested (p>.05) and did not depend on the isolates origin (p>.05). 3. Posaconazole had the lowest MICs (p< 0.001). 4. The itraconazole-resistant reference strain did not give cross resistance with voriconazole and posaconazole. CONCLUSIONS: Among azoles, posaconazole had a better in vitro activity against A. fumigatus than did voriconazole or itraconazole. Spectrophotometric reading could replace the less standardized visual reading for NCCLS microdilution method and MIC values obtained were comparable among all A. fumigatus isolates. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative influence of burial depth on the clay mineral assemblage of the Agadir-Essaouira basin (western High Atlas, Morocco)
Daoudi, Lachen; Ouajhain, B.; Rocha, F. et al

in Clay Minerals (2010), 45(4), 453-467

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