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See detailCopulatory Behavior Is Controlled by the Sexually Dimorphic Nucleus of the Quail Poa
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Surlemont, C.

in Brain Research Bulletin (1990), 25(1), 7-14

The medial preoptic nucleus (POM) of the quail preoptic area is sexually dimorphic and testosterone sensitive. Stereotaxic implantation of needles filled with crystalline testosterone demonstrated that ... [more ▼]

The medial preoptic nucleus (POM) of the quail preoptic area is sexually dimorphic and testosterone sensitive. Stereotaxic implantation of needles filled with crystalline testosterone demonstrated that the POM is a critical site of steroid action in the control of copulatory behavior. Only implants located in the POM reliably restored the behavior in castrated birds. Implants around the nucleus weakly activated the behavior; those which were distant by more than 200 microns were totally inactive. Electrolytic lesions confirmed the role of the POM in the control of copulatory behavior. The percentage of the POM which was lesioned was highly correlated to the behavioral deficit while the absolute size of the lesion was not. Electrolytic lesions in or around POM also significantly decreased the volume of the nucleus suggesting that the afferents and efferents of the nucleus are required for its full development. The total volume of the POM was correlated with the sexual behavior of the birds. The morphological changes in POM observed following exposure to testosterone probably represent the signature of the behavioral effects of the steroid. The sexually dimorphic testosterone-sensitive POM is therefore an excellent animal model to study the brain-steroid interactions which mediate the activation of male reproductive behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailLa coqueluche, sa situation actuelle et ses risques
Senterre, Thibault ULg

Conference (2001, October 26)

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See detailUne coquille : archive du passé
Poulicek, Mathieu ULg

in Coquilles coquines (2009)

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See detailCoquille : symbole, art et parure
Poulicek, Mathieu ULg

in Coquilles coquines (2009)

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See detailUne coquille, qu'est-ce que c'est?
Poulicek, Mathieu ULg

in Coquilles coquines (2009)

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See detailCoquilles coquines, les attraits des Mollusques
Poulicek, Mathieu ULg

in Coquilles coquines (2009)

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See detailThe CORALIE survey for southern extrasolar planets XVII. New and updated long period and massive planets
Marmier, M.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

Context. Since 1998, a planet-search program around main sequence stars within 50 pc in the southern hemisphere has been carried out with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph at La Silla Observatory. Aims ... [more ▼]

Context. Since 1998, a planet-search program around main sequence stars within 50 pc in the southern hemisphere has been carried out with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph at La Silla Observatory. Aims: With an observing time span of more than 14 years, the CORALIE survey is now able to unveil Jovian planets on Jupiter's period domain. This growing period-interval coverage is important for building formation and migration models since observational constraints are still weak for periods beyond the ice line. Methods: Long-term precise Doppler measurements with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph, together with a few additional observations made with the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6 m telescope, reveal radial velocity signatures of massive planetary companions on long-period orbits. Results: In this paper we present seven new planets orbiting HD 27631, HD 98649, HD 106515A, HD 166724, HD 196067, HD 219077, and HD 220689, together with the CORALIE orbital parameters for three already known planets around HD 10647, HD 30562, and HD 86226. The period range of the new planetary companions goes from 2200 to 5500 days and covers a mass domain between 1 and 10.5 MJup. Surprisingly, five of them present very high eccentricities above e > 0.57. A pumping scenario by Kozai mechanism may be invoked for HD 106515Ab and HD 196067b, which are both orbiting stars in multiple systems. Since the presence of a third massive body cannot be inferred from the data of HD 98649b, HD 166724b, and HD 219077b, the origin of the eccentricity of these systems remains unknown. Except for HD 10647b, no constraint on the upper mass of the planets is provided by Hipparcos astrometric data. Finally, the hosts of these long period planets show no metallicity excess. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CORALIE survey for southern extrasolar planets. XVI. Discovery of a planetary system around HD 147018 and of two long period and massive planets orbiting HD 171238 and HD 204313
Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Mayor, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 511

We report the detection of a double planetary system around HD 140718 as well as the discovery of two long period and massive planets orbiting HD 171238 and HD 204313. Those discoveries were made with the ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of a double planetary system around HD 140718 as well as the discovery of two long period and massive planets orbiting HD 171238 and HD 204313. Those discoveries were made with the CORALIE Echelle spectrograph mounted on the 1.2-m Euler Swiss telescope located at La Silla Observatory, Chile. The planetary system orbiting the nearby G9 dwarf HD 147018 is composed of an eccentric inner planet (e = 0.47) with twice the mass of Jupiter (2.1 MJup) and with an orbital period of 44.24 days. The outer planet is even more massive (6.6 MJup) with a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.13) and a period of 1008 days. The planet orbiting HD 171238 has a minimum mass of 2.6 MJup, a period of 1523 days and an eccentricity of 0.40. It orbits a G8 dwarfs at 2.5 AU. The last planet, <ASTROBJ>HD 204313</ASTROBJ> b, is a 4.0 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]-planet with a period of 5.3 years and has a low eccentricity (e = 0.13). It orbits a G5 dwarfs at 3.1 AU. The three parent stars are metal rich, which further strengthens the case that massive planets tend to form around metal rich stars. [less ▲]

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See detailCorals of the Upper Viséan Microbial-Sponge-Bryozoan-Coral Bioherm of Kongul Yayla (Taurides, S Turkey), Palaeobiogeographic Relations
Denayer, Julien ULg

in Turkish Association of Petroleum Geologists, Special Publication (2012), 6

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See detailThe CORALS project: simulated Cosmic Radiations and Alternative Splicing.
Lambert, Charles ULg; Battout, S.; Van Oostveldt, P. et al

Conference (2009)

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See detailUn Coran liégeois
Martin, Aubert ULg; Bauden, Frédéric ULg

in La Vie Wallonne (1992), 56(417-418), 5-20

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See detailCord blood banking
Brand, A.; Rebulla, P.; Engelfriet, C. P. et al

in Vox Sanguinis (2008), 95

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See detailCord blood banking Introduction-State of the art
BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg

in Gluckman, Eliane; Cavazzana (Eds.) World Cord blood congress IV and innovative therapies for sickle cell disease (2013, October 25)

Since the early years 1990 when the first cord blood (CB) banks were created, the worldwide inventory has grown considerably to a current 590 thousand units that complement the 22 M donors to provide ... [more ▼]

Since the early years 1990 when the first cord blood (CB) banks were created, the worldwide inventory has grown considerably to a current 590 thousand units that complement the 22 M donors to provide hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) to patients in need of an allogeneic transplantation. The existing inventory shows a high degree of heterogeneity with a significant number of units below the current transplantation standards for adult patients. In the mean time, the use of CB as a HPC source has remained steady over the last years, leading to a relative decrease in the release activity in each individual bank. New challenges and innovations have emerged, such as: • More stringent regulations in the USA and in the EU • Upgrades in professional standards • Competing transplantation approaches such as easier access to adult unrelated donors (UD), use of haplo identical donors, single or multiple CB transplantation • CB collection safety becoming a concern since issues have been raised about the outcome of newborns linked to their iron status • The definition of clear criteria for transplant selection (HLA typing level, cell contents) • Potential role of CB banks in non hematological CB use (use of CB byproducts, generation of iPS from selected universal donors, immunotherapy, HIV therapy) • Financial restrictions The elements mentioned above have lead banking strategies, including recruitment, donor selection, CB collection, processing, storage and release to evolve considerably and to incorporate • Active volunteer accreditation processes for international recognition • Donor recruitment: more detailed and selective donor evaluation • Systematic nucleic acid (NAT) testing for infectious disease markers (IDM) • Extensive use of molecular HLA typing and widening range of loci to be taken into account • Evolving definition of acceptance criteria for incoming CB units, (i.e. stricter TNC requirements) • Well standardized processing and storage methods • Evaluation and adaptation of supply vs. needs in strategic approaches • Need to increase and optimize CB visibility through up to date electronic solutions • Methods to have a permanent and up to date overview of post transplantation outcomes, including elements relevant to the banking and clinical side Professional organizations (NetCord, WMDA, FACT, WBMT) are in the process of tightening their links in order to increase interactions and respond in time to upcoming challenges and evolutions of the field. [less ▲]

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See detailCord Blood Banking: Cord blood management and evaluation: International networking
Van Beckhoven, Jacqueline; BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg; Duffy, Merry et al

in Bart, Thomas; Hwang, William; Boo, Michael (Eds.) A gift for life, WMDA handbook for blood stem cell donation (2013)

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See detailCord blood for allogeneic use: Clinical and scientific aspects?
BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg; Benoit, Yves et al

Report (2012)

In this science-policy advisory report, the Superior Health Council issues advice on cord blood as an allogeneic source of stem cells for human clinical use

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See detailCord blood transplantation in a child with Pearson's disease.
Hoyoux, Claire; Dresse, Marie-Françoise ULg; Robinet, Sébastien ULg et al

in Pediatric Blood & Cancer (2008), 51(4), 566

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See detailCORD DONOR Safety
BAUDOUX, Etienne ULg; Lefebvre, Caroline ULg; FASTH, Anders

Conference (2014, May 16)

As for any cell donation, donor safety parameters must be included in the design of cord blood (CB) collection procedures. Until recently, CB donation has been regarded as a relatively safe procedure, and ... [more ▼]

As for any cell donation, donor safety parameters must be included in the design of cord blood (CB) collection procedures. Until recently, CB donation has been regarded as a relatively safe procedure, and practices have evolved from the early stages of CB banking to make reasonable provisions to protect mothers and infant donors from harm linked to CB donation: informed consent, exclusion of complicated pregnancies and deliveries, as well as of pre-term births, non-interference with obstetrical practices, use of trained staff for CB collection, standardized aseptic collection practices, donation limited to single births. Besides, professional standards foresee careful record keeping of clinical side effects that may occur in the course of CB collection. Since 2011 time to cord clamping has become a concern in the light of publications on iron depletion and post natal outcome, including neurological development, and linked to early or late cord clamping at birth. As data show benefits of late clamping in low birth weight infants in terms of anemia and iron stores, it now admitted by professional organizations to delay cord clamping for 1 minute after birth, especially for pre-term births. However, in full term births after uncomplicated pregnancy, that are the target population for CB donation, there is no clear indication to confirm or refute benefits of late clamping. In some countries, sometimes emotional awareness has increased about optimal timing of cord clamping, leading to some resistance to CB donation and to questioning of the harmless reputation of CB donation. CB banking professionals however have not changed their recommendations, leaving up to obstetrical teams the decision to collect or not, after risk benefit assessment. However, CB bankers remain with the duty of providing transparent and up to date information to mothers, as well as of setting up accurate policies regarding informed consent. [less ▲]

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