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See detailControl Charts monitoring product’s loss to society
Celano, Giovanni; Faraz, Alireza ULg; Saniga, Erwin

in Quality and Reliability Engineering International (2013)

Taguchi introduced a new philosophy in quality control that accounts for the economic loss associated to process variation measured by deviations from the target value of a product quality characteristic ... [more ▼]

Taguchi introduced a new philosophy in quality control that accounts for the economic loss associated to process variation measured by deviations from the target value of a product quality characteristic. The Taguchi loss function has been considered in the design of control charts only for the computation of costs associated with nonconformities. This paper considers sample statistics based on the Taguchi loss function as a means to implement Shewhart control charts monitoring both the deviation from the target and dispersion of normally distributed quality characteristics. The aim of this proposed control chart is to perform on-line quality control of a process by monitoring its quality loss cost performance over time. To compute the quality loss performance, we consider a nominal-the-best quality characteristic. The statistical performance of the proposed control charts has been evaluated and compared with that of widely used control charts. Implementing target costing philosophy by means of one of the proposed charts is also discussed. An example illustrates the Taguchi control chart in a practical implementation. [less ▲]

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See detailControl Engineering Challenges in Systems and Synthetic Biology
Bullinger, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2010, March 19)

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See detailControl Engineering in Systems Biology
Bullinger, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2004, July 08)

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See detailControl in a dissipative environment: the example of a Cope rearrangement
Chenel, Aurélie; Dive, Georges ULg; Meier, Christopher et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry A (2012), 116

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See detailControl in Biological Systems - from Intercellular Signalling to the Organism
Bullinger, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2010, April 28)

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See detailControl in Biological Systems - from Intercellular Signalling to the Organism
Bullinger, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2011, September 16)

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See detailControl of Allergen-Induced Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness by the Metalloproteinase ADAMTS-12
Paulissen, Geneviève ULg; El Hour, Mehdi; Rocks, Natacha ULg et al

in Journal of Immunology (2012), 189

A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) constitute a family of endopeptidases related to matrix metalloproteinases. These proteinases have been largely implicated in tissue ... [more ▼]

A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) constitute a family of endopeptidases related to matrix metalloproteinases. These proteinases have been largely implicated in tissue remodeling associated with pathological processes. Among them, ADAMTS12 was identified as an asthma-associated gene in a human genome screening program. However, its functional implication in asthma is not yet documented. The present study aims at investigating potential ADAMTS-12 functions in experimental models of allergic airways disease. Two different in vivo protocols of allergen-induced airways disease were applied to the recently generated Adamts12-deficient mice and corresponding wild-type mice. In this study, we provide evidence for a protective effect of ADAMTS-12 against bronchial inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. In the absence of Adamts12, challenge with different allergens (OVA and house dust mite) led to exacerbated eosinophilic inflammation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in lung tissue, along with airway dysfunction assessed by increased airway responsiveness following methacholine exposure. Furthermore, mast cell counts and ST2 receptor and IL-33 levels were higher in the lungs of allergen-challenged Adamts12-deficient mice. The present study provides, to our knowledge, the first experimental evidence for a contribution of ADAMTS-12 as a key mediator in airways disease, interfering with immunological processes leading to inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of apple blue mold by the antagonistic yeast pichia anomala strain K: screening of UV protectants for preharvest application
Lahlali, Rachid; Brostaux, Yves; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

in Plant Disease (2011), 95(3), 311-316

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See detailControl of attosecond electronic dynamics in molecules
Mignolet, Benoît ULg

Doctoral thesis (2014)

In the last decade, the development of ultrashort, attosecond and few-femtosecond laser pulses opened new avenues towards probing and controlling molecular electron dynamics, and thereby molecular ... [more ▼]

In the last decade, the development of ultrashort, attosecond and few-femtosecond laser pulses opened new avenues towards probing and controlling molecular electron dynamics, and thereby molecular reactivity. The aim of the thesis is to show by dynamical simulations that the purely electronic dynamics in molecules can be controlled and probed by ultrashort pulses. When an ultrashort pulse is used to excite a molecule, an electronic reorganization occurs before the onset of nuclear motion. In the first dozen of femtoseconds following the excitation, there is a timescale where the dynamics is purely electronic and where the nuclei can be considered as fixed. It is in this time windows that we showed that we can control the spatial localization of the electronic density by tuning the parameters of the pulse. It is important to control this density because at the end of the pulse, the electronic density is out equilibrium and it creates a force on the nuclei that is different from that which we would get from the Born Oppenheimer separation. So by controlling the electronic density, we could trigger a specific outcome of a chemical reaction or rearrangement, which would offer a new way to control chemical reactivity. This control is different from conventional photochemistry where the electrons are equilibrated with the instantaneous position of the nuclei. The research has been focused on the development of theories and methodologies for the description of the non-equilibrium electronic dynamics and its probing and on the applications to small and large molecules for the comparison with experimental results. The description of the dynamics induced by short and intense electric field requires the use a non perturbative method that takes into account the time profile of the strong electric field. We used a time-dependent multiconfigurational method where the time-dependent electronic wavefunction is expressed on a basis of the time-independent field free electronic states of the molecule. This method is particularly well fitted for the description of the electronic dynamics of large systems since it only requires the electronic structure of the field free excited states, which can be computed using quantum chemistry methods adapted to the size of the molecule. We integrate the time-dependent Schrödinger equation at a frozen nuclear geometry with an electronic Hamiltonian that is time-dependent and includes the effect of the electric field of the pulse. The field free electronic states of the molecule are coupled due to the dipole interaction induced by the strong field, which creates a non stationary coherent superposition of states with the electronic density localized in different regions of the molecule as a function of time. The control of the spatial localization of the electronic density can be obtained for aligned molecules by tailoring the parameters of the pulse, mainly the carrier frequency and the polarization. We demonstrated control in the LiH molecule and in a larger molecule, ABCU (C10H19N), a cage molecule composed of 86 electrons. The ultrafast electronic dynamics can be probed by a second pulse that photoionizes it. We showed that the molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPAD) can be used to probe the interferences between the states and that a given coherent superposition of states yields a unique MFPAD, which makes the ionization an ideal probe of the electronic dynamics. The computation of the MFPAD requires the evaluation of the dipole-coupling matrix element between a neutral state and an ionized state. We chose to express the ionized state as the antisymmetrized product of a cationic state and an orthogonal plane wave that describes the wavefunction of the ionized electron. The dipole-coupling matrix element is a n electron integral that can be reduced to a one electron integral composed of the dipole coupling between an orthogonalized plane wave and a Dyson orbital. The Dyson orbital is the overlap between the neutral and cationic state and represents the orbital from which the electron has been ionized. We first modeled a sequential pump-probe experiment on ABCU (C10H19N) and LiH at a fixed nuclear geometry. The pump pulse induces a motion of the electronic density in the neutral electronic states of the molecule that is subsequently probed by a sudden ionization. Our computations show that the MFPAD vary significantly as a function of the pump probe delay, and reflect the electronic dynamics. We also used the sudden ionization approximation to probe the dynamics in the cationic states of tetrapeptides. In that case, the pump-probe scheme is slightly different. The neutral molecule is first suddenly photoionized to the cation states, which creates a coherent superposition of states with amplitudes depending on the photoionization coupling elements. The motion of the electronic density along the molecular backbone of the tetrapeptide cation is then probed by a second sudden ionization. We also developed a coupled equations scheme based on the partitioning technique with the aim to describe the ionization dynamics and the electronic dynamics on the same level. The complete space is partitioned into a subspace composed of the neutral bound states and a subspace composed of the ionized states. We then integrate the time-dependent Schrödinger equation where the bound and ionized subspaces are coupled by the electric field. Using such formalism, we can describe pump probe experiments involving multiphoton excitation (and ionization) by an IR pulse and ionization by a train of attosecond pulses, as it is often encountered in attosecond experiment. We showed in a realistic IR pump – attosecond pulse train (APT) probe experiment on LiH that the non stationary electron dynamics can be triggered by an ultrashort IR pulse and probed by angularly resolved ultrafast ionization induced by a train of attopulses. We proposed a new probing scheme where the APT acts as a frequency filter that only probes the superposition of states with a beating frequency matching the time interval between two XUV attopulses of the train. The coupled equation scheme can be applied to larger systems since it only requires the electronic structure of the excited states of the molecule. We used coupled equations to investigate the charge migration in the cationic states of PENNA (C10H15N), a relatively large molecule composed on a phenyl chromophore on one side of the molecule and an amine chromophore on the other side. The IR pulse launches the dynamics in the cationic states that is then probed by a femtosecond XUV pulse. In the thesis, we also investigated the ionization of Super Atom Molecular Orbitals (SAMO), which are diffuse hydrogenoid like orbitals that can be found in fullerenes like C60 or in nanostructure. This work was carried out in collaboration E. Campbell group’s (University of Edinburgh) where angularly resolved photoelectron spectra were measured for gas phase C60 with c.a. 100fs pulse. The angularly resolved photoelectron spectrum only exhibits peaks corresponding the SAMO states. In order to support this attribution we computed the electronic structure and the photoionization lifetime of the 500 lowest excited states of C60 for a sudden photoionization. The SAMO states have a lifetime of the order of a femtosecond while the other states have photoionization lifetimes 3 to 4 orders of magnitudes larger. This difference in photoionization time scales explains why the SAMO states are the only states that photoionize during the c.a. 100fs pulse. The SAMO states act as doorway states for the photoionization. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of B16 mealnoma cells differentiation and proliferation by CuSO4 and vitamin C
De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULg; Siwek, Brigitte; Pozzi, G. et al

in Anticancer Research (1990), 10(2A), 391-405

The paper demonstrates that the toxicity of CuSO4 in B16 melanoma cells is increased in serum-free medium and in the presence of Vitamin C. Vitamin C toxicity for B16 cells was increased in the presence ... [more ▼]

The paper demonstrates that the toxicity of CuSO4 in B16 melanoma cells is increased in serum-free medium and in the presence of Vitamin C. Vitamin C toxicity for B16 cells was increased in the presence of CUS04. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of B16 melanoma cells differentiation in culture by exogenous FeS04, CuS04 and Vitamin C
De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire ULg; Siwek, Brigitte; Bassleer, Roger

in Cytotechnology (1988)

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See detailControl of Bimanual Rhythmic Movements: Trading Efficiency for Robustness Depending on the Context
Ronsse, R.; Thonnard, J. L.; Lefevre Philippe et al

in Experimental Brain Research = Experimentelle Hirnforschung = Expérimentation Cérébrale (2008)

This paper investigates how the efficiency and robustness of a skilled rhythmic task compete against each other in the control of a bimanual movement. Human subjects juggled a puck in 2D through impacts ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates how the efficiency and robustness of a skilled rhythmic task compete against each other in the control of a bimanual movement. Human subjects juggled a puck in 2D through impacts with two metallic arms, requiring rhythmic bimanual actuation. The arms kinematics were only constrained by the position, velocity and time of impacts while the rest of the trajectory did not influence the movement of the puck. In order to expose the task robustness, we manipulated the task context in two distinct manners: the task tempo was assigned at four different values (hence manipulating the time available to plan and execute each impact movement individually); and vision was withdrawn during half of the trials (hence reducing the sensory inflows). We show that when the tempo was fast, the actuation was rhythmic (no pause in the trajectory) while at slow tempo, the actuation was discrete (with pause intervals between individual movements). Moreover, the withdrawal of visual information encouraged the rhythmic behavior at the four tested tempi. The discrete versus rhythmic behavior give different answers to the efficiency/robustness trade-off: discrete movements result in energy efficient movements, while rhythmic movements impact the puck with negative acceleration, a property preserving robustness. Moreover, we report that in all conditions the impact velocity of the arms was negatively correlated with the energy of the puck. This correlation tended to stabilize the task and was influenced by vision, revealing again different control strategies. In conclusion, this task involves different modes of control that balance efficiency and robustness, depending on the context. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of breathing in healthy and Pasteurella exposed calves after 5-HT2 receptor blockade
Rollin, Frédéric ULg; Close, Patricia ULg; Linden, Annick ULg et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1994), 426

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See detailControl of breathing in healthy and pasteurella-exposed calves after 5-HT receptor blockade
Rollin, Frédéric ULg; Close, R; Linden, Annick ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XIXth World Association for Buiatrics Congress (1996)

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See detailControl of breathing in resting and exercising animals
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Rollin, Frédéric ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg

in Lekeux, Pierre (Ed.) Pulmonary Function in Healthy, Exercising and Diseased Animals (1993)

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See detailControl of breathing in unanesthetized healthy and Pasteurella-exposed calves after 5-HT2 receptor antagonism by metrenperone
Rollin, Frédéric ULg; Close, A; Linden, Annick ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XVIIIth World Buiatrics Congress (1994)

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See detailControl of chitin and N-acetylglucosamine utilization in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.
Liao, Chengheng; Rigali, Sébastien ULg; Licona-Cassani, C et al

in Microbiology (2014)

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See detailControl of chorionic obstructive pulmonary disease in the horse
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg; Roberts, C.

in British Veterinary Journal (The) (1996), 152

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See detailControl of citrus blue mold by the antagonist yeast Pichia guilliermondii Z1: compatibility with commercial fruit waxes and putative mechanisms of action.
Lahlali, Rachid; Hamadi, Younes; Drider, R. et al

in Food Control (2014), 45

Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, which was previously proven to be effective against blue mold of citrus fruit, has been further tested in controlled conditions to determine whether the yeast, as an ... [more ▼]

Pichia guilliermondii strain Z1, which was previously proven to be effective against blue mold of citrus fruit, has been further tested in controlled conditions to determine whether the yeast, as an alternative for synthetic fungicides, would be compatible with other postharvest practices used commercially. In particular, commercial fruit waxes can reduce their survival and effectiveness. The commercial fruit waxes tested, in combination at 20% with strain Z1, included microcrystalline, ester gum, candelilla, beeswax, montan, paraffin, rice bran, rosin maleic, carnauba, shellac, and one mixture shellac plus carnauba. Beeswax, paraffin, rosin maleic, carnauba, and shellac increased significantly strain Z1 survival in Petri dish assays. Candelilla, beeswax, rice bran, rosin maleic, carnauba, shellac, and shellacecarnauba mixture did not significantly reduce the strain Z1 yield on orange fruit surfaces compared to other waxes. With the exception of rosin maleic wax, none of the commercial fruit waxes or mixture increased significantly the ability of the formulated product of strain Z1 to control the postharvest pathogen Penicillium italicum on wounded orange fruit. When the formulated product of strain Z1 was used in combination with beeswax, strain Z1 retained the same efficacy. In contrast, microcrystalline, ester gum, candelilla, montan, paraffin, rice bran, carnauba, shellac, and shellac-carnauba mixture significantly reduced the effectiveness of the formulated product of strain Z1. No antibiosis was detected for strain Z1 against P. italicum. Strain Z1 inhibited the spore germination for the low juice concentration (up to 5%) when compared to the control. However, the addition of fresh juice after antagonist removal allowed the restoration of the germination of P. italicum spores; suggesting the possibility of competition for nutrients in the biocontrol activity of strain Z1. The study demonstrates the potential commercial application of strain Z1 with beeswax and rosin maleic wax for postharvest control of citrus blue mold. As biocontrol relies on competition for nutrients, an enriched formulation with nutrients is needed for reliable antifungal activity of this yeast strain [less ▲]

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