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See detailCultivars, culture conditions and harvest time influence phenolic and ascorbic acid contents and antioxidant capacity of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa)
Pincemail, Joël ULg; Kevers, Claire ULg; Tabart, Jessica ULg et al

in Journal of Food Science (2012), 77

Strawberries are a good source of micronutrients, especially antioxidant phenolics. More information is needed to better exploit the health-promoting effect of such fruits. Several studies focused on the ... [more ▼]

Strawberries are a good source of micronutrients, especially antioxidant phenolics. More information is needed to better exploit the health-promoting effect of such fruits. Several studies focused on the effects of genotype, cultural practices and seasonal variation on the antioxidant potential of strawberries, but often yielding contradictory results and/or focusing on only one source of variability. In the present study, we showed that total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid and antioxidant capacity strongly differed between genotypes of strawberry. The precise results revealed the importance of genetic background for the antioxidant capacity and for the content of total phenolics (with up to 3.3-fold variations). Other parameters may also influence the antioxidant capacity in strawberry such as harvest time, culture conditions and environmental factors. Moreover, in this study, the harvesting time (at the same ripening stage) appeared to be very important, more important than genotype. Variations of the antioxidant capacity of up to 4.1-folds were observed following the harvesting time of “Elsanta” cultivar. [less ▲]

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See detailA cultivation-independent approach for the genetic and cyanotoxin characterization of colonial cyanobacteria
Lara, Yannick ULg; Lambion, Alexandre ULg; Menzel, Diana et al

in Aquatic Microbial Ecology (2013), 69

To bypass the constraint of cyanobacterial strain isolation and cultivation, a combination of whole genome amplification (WGA) and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) for microcystin toxins (MCs) was tested ... [more ▼]

To bypass the constraint of cyanobacterial strain isolation and cultivation, a combination of whole genome amplification (WGA) and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) for microcystin toxins (MCs) was tested on individual colonies of Microcystis and Woronichinia, taken directly from aquatic environments. Genomic DNA of boiled cells was amplified by multiple strand displacement amplification (MDA), followed by several specific PCR reactions to characterize the genotype of each colony. Sequences of 3 different housekeeping genes (ftsZ, gltX, and recA), of 3 MC biosynthesis genes (mcyA, mcyB, and mcyE), and the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) were analyzed for 11 colonies of Microcystis. MCs were detected and quantified by ELISA in 7 of the 11 Microcystis colonies tested, in agreement with the detection of mcy genes. Sequence types (ST) based on the concatenated sequences of housekeeping genes from cyanobacterial colonies from Belgian water bodies appeared to be endemic when compared to those of strains described in the literature. One colony appeared to belong to a yet undiscovered lineage. A similar protocol was used for 6 colonies of the genus Woronichinia, a taxon that is very difficult to cultivate in the laboratory. The 16S rRNA sequences of 2 colonies were obtained and were quasi identical to that of W. naegeliana 0LE35S01. For one Woronichinia colony, the mcyE PCR gave a non-specific PCR product. The corresponding amino acid sequence was 50% identical to a Microcystis ketoacyl carrier protein transferase. This approach for the simultaneous detection and quantification of MCs with mcy genotyping, at single colony level, offers potential for the ecotoxicological characterization of environmental populations of cyanobacteria without the need for strain isolation and culture. [less ▲]

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See detailCultiver d’autres expertises sur les sciences et les technologies
Thoreau, François ULg

in Revue Nouvelle (2012), 10

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See detailCultiver un avantage technologique dans les réseaux, le cas de la Compagnie Générale des Eaux
Froehlicher, Thomas ULg; Baroncelli, Allessandro; Assens, Christophe

in Annales des Mines. Gérer et Comprendre (2002), 68

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (3 ULg)
See detailLa cultura en México (1950-1972)
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULg

in L'ordinaire. Mexique Amérique Centrale (1992), 138

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
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See detailLa Cultura en México (1959-1972) (II)
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULg

in Artes. Educación/Investigación/Crítica (1989), 13

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See detailLa Cultura en México (1959-1972)
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULg

in Artes. Educación/Investigación/Crítica (1989), 12

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See detailCultura escrita en sociedades tradicionales
Goody, Jack; Vitale, Gloria; Willson, Patricia ULg

Book published by Editorial Gedisa (1996)

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See detailCultura, pensamiento y escritura
Bottéro, Jean; Vandermeersch, Léon; Lapacherie, Jean-Gérard et al

Book published by Editorial Gedisa (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (9 ULg)
See detailthe Cultural Borders
Born, Michel ULg

in Isacchini, M. (Ed.) Frontiera (2000)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
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See detailCultural characteristics, pathogenicity and vegetative compatibility of Fusarium udum isolates from pigeonpea (Cajanus Cajan (L.) Millsp.) in Kenya
Kiprop, E. K.; Mwang'Ombe, A. W.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg et al

in European Journal of Plant Pathology (2002), 108(2), 147-154

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See detailCultural diversity and Subsidiarity: more of the same or conflicting principles ? The case of cultural tourism in the European Union
Dumont, Elisabeth; Teller, Jacques ULg

in European Studies : A Journal of European Culture, History & Politics (2007), 24

This article takes the example of cultural tourism to highlight the specificities of European Cultural Policies. It argues, that, although it is often presented as a way of supporting a diversity of ... [more ▼]

This article takes the example of cultural tourism to highlight the specificities of European Cultural Policies. It argues, that, although it is often presented as a way of supporting a diversity of approaches, styles and objectives, the subsidiarity principle can sometimes endanger the cultural diversity it seeks to protect. Tourism for instance, has long been considered as a self-regulating activity and cultural tourism is often considered as “sustainable by nature”. Experience however shows that local authorities often lack an understanding of all the intricacies and consequences of cultural tourism development. Without proper tools for assessing and preventing negative impacts, local actors may lose control over its development, miss on benefit and endanger the diversity of cultures currently existing and co-existing in the European Union. [less ▲]

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See detailCultural Marxism in the Anglo-Saxon radical right literature
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

in Jackson, Paul (Ed.) The Postwar Anglo-American Far Right: A Special Relationship of Hate (in press)

This chapter will analyze the place of the threat alleged of Cultural Marxism in the discourse of the radical and extreme right, in the United States as well as in continental Europe and the United ... [more ▼]

This chapter will analyze the place of the threat alleged of Cultural Marxism in the discourse of the radical and extreme right, in the United States as well as in continental Europe and the United Kingdom. The underlying aim of this chapter is to examine the determinant role that this ‘threat’ plays in the Anglo Saxon extreme right, in particular at the intellectual, ideological and doctrinal levels, in comparison to other countries. Certainly if the Netherlands, France or other countries have parties or political groups which borrow the rhetoric of ‘fighting’ against Cultural Marxism, or its more nebulous variant, ‘political correctness’, it certainly finds its origins in the United States, and more broadly the Anglo-Saxon world. To achieve this, the chapter will begin by unpicking the meanings behind the notion of Cultural Marxism, from its origins to its use in Anders Breivik’s manifesto released shortly before the Oslo and UtØya massacres. It will show that the term emerged from the literature of American ultraconservatives following the fall of the Berlin Wall as a consequence of the disappearance of the ‘red menace’ of Communism. Secondly, it will focus on two important moments in the development of the term. It will describe the phrase’s usage from the beginning of the 2000s within the discourse of Pat Buchanan, a political commentator and multiple U.S. presidential candidate. Then it will illustrate the re-emergence of the term some 10 years later, in the manifesto of Anders Breivik and in the subsequent justification of his acts throughout his trial. In both cases, we will see that Buchanan and Breivik emphasize the same basic theme, Cultural Marxism, in their denouncement of what they see as two different threats. Finally, from these explorations of the usage of the term, the discussion will examine other current uses of the notion of ‘Cultural Marxism’ in the British and American radical right. To conclude, it will show how the ‘Cultural Marxism’ threats are used by a variety of activists to argue for the defence of their political standpoints, setting this in a language of preserving freedom and democracy, but ultimately only within a framework designed to defend Judeo-Christian values. [less ▲]

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See detailCultural Marxism in the Anglo-Saxon radical right literature
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

Conference (2012)

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See detailCultural Policies and minorities artistic expressions: comparing Liège and Naples
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Scientific conference (2014, March 14)

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See detail“The cultural politics of migrant labour rights in South China: from narrating the “dagong” to online boundary-spanning”
Florence, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2012, September 05)

For the last two decades, in a context of combined flexible capitalism and “decentralized legal authoritarianism” (Lee Ching-Kwan, Against the Law), factories of the Pearl River Delta have been witnessing ... [more ▼]

For the last two decades, in a context of combined flexible capitalism and “decentralized legal authoritarianism” (Lee Ching-Kwan, Against the Law), factories of the Pearl River Delta have been witnessing a growing spate of collective actions by rural migrant workers. In this paper the narrative categories and “frames of contention” mobilized by migrant workers in claim-making will be investigated. The focus is put chiefly on two differently mediated genres of narratives, i.e. migrant workers’ narratives in magazines on the one hand, and more recent online written practices centred on the politics of rights and identity on the other hand. Such cultural politics of migrant labour has been insufficiently taken into account when considering the greater right awareness and surge in collective mobilization in China for the last decade. The paper develops the argument that workers’ written practices within magazines help constituting a space for struggle and negotiation around major values, state polities and legislation linked to workers’ rights. Secondly, drawing on the notion of “disorderly media” (Latham), it is argued that some of the online written practices by migrant workers may provide platforms for more radical articulations of the politics of rights and collective mobilization. What are the points of discursive rupture and contention around which processes of reversal, reapropriation, affirmation or euphemization occur? What kinds of material, socioeconomic and political relations do these identification and legitimization processes reveal? These are the questions that will be investigated. A vast body of data are used for this paper, including songs and poems by rural workers, participant observation, in-depth interviews, published and unpublished letters to the editor of several migrants’ magazines, etc. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)