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Peer Reviewed
See detailContraste et sensibilité lors de la scintigraphie thyroïdienne pratiquée avec les neuf caméras des trois principaux centres hospitaliers liégeois.
Seret, Alain ULg

in Médecine Nucléaire : Imagerie Fonctionnelle et Métabolique (2005), 29(11), 711

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See detailContrasted skin capacitance imaging of seborrheic keratoses and melanocytic nevi.
Xhauflaire, Emmanuelle ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Dermatology : International Journal for Clinical & Investigative Dermatology (2006), 212(4), 394-7

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See detailContrasted views on environmental migration: the case of Tuvaluan migration to New Zealand
Shen, Shawn; Gemenne, François ULg

in International Migration (2011), 49

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See detailContrastief prosodieonderzoek Nederlands-Frans. Een contrastief-typologische kijk op de accentuering
Rasier, Laurent ULg

in Verslagen en Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Academie voor Nederlandse Taal- en Letterkunde (2008), 118(1), 49-67

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See detailContrastief taalonderzoek geïntegreerd aanpakken: hoe en waarom?
Rasier, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Philippe; Baelen, Mélanie et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailContrastief woordenboek Nederlands - Duits
Theissen, Siegfried ULg; Klein, Caroline

Book published by C.I.P.L. (2008)

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See detailContrastieve (tussen)taalkunde: nuttig, nodig of overbodig?
Hiligsmann, Philippe ULg; Rasier, Laurent ULg

in Verslagen en Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Academie voor Nederlandse Taal- en Letterkunde (2007), 117(2), 147-161

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See detailHet contrastieve element in Nederlandse en Duitse spreekwoorden en uitdrukkingen
Van Hoof, Florence ULg

Master's dissertation (1996)

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See detailContrastieve onderzoeksmodellen onder de loep
Rasier, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Philippe

Conference (2009)

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See detailContrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin)
Bouillon, Steven; Yambélé, Athanase; Gillikin, David P. et al

in Scientific Reports (2014), 4

The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to ... [more ▼]

The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. d13C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between -28.1 per mil and -25.8 per mil, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin. [less ▲]

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See detailContrasting patterns of phytoplankton communities in two coastal ecosystems in relation to environmental factors (Corsica, NW Mediterranean Sea)
Garrido, Marie; Koeck, Barbara; Goffart, Anne ULg et al

in Diversity (2014), 6

Corsica Island is a sub-basin of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, with hydrological features typical of both oligotrophic systems and eutrophic coastal zones. Phytoplankton assemblages in two coastal ... [more ▼]

Corsica Island is a sub-basin of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, with hydrological features typical of both oligotrophic systems and eutrophic coastal zones. Phytoplankton assemblages in two coastal ecosystems of Corsica (the deep Bay of Calvi and the shallow littoral of Bastia) show contrasting patterns over a one-year cycle. In order to determine what drives these variations, seasonal changes in littoral phytoplankton are considered together with environmental parameters. Our methodology combined a survey of the physico-chemical structure of the subsurface water with a characterization of the phytoplankton community structure. Sampling provided a detailed record of the seasonal changes and successions that occur in these two areas. Results showed that the two sampled stations presented different phytoplankton abundance and distribution patterns, notably during the winter–spring bloom period. Successions in pico-, nano-, and microphytoplankton communities appeared mainly driven by differences in the ability to acquire nutrients, and in community-specific growth rates. Phytoplankton structure and dynamics are discussed in relation to available data on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. These results confirm that integrated monitoring of coastal areas is a requisite for gaining a proper understanding of marine ecosystems. [less ▲]

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See detailContrasting response of European forest and grassland energy exchange to heatwaves
Teuling, A. J.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Stöckli, R. et al

in Nature Geoscience (2010), 3(10), 722-727

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See detailContrasting responses of saproxylic insects to focal habitat resources: The example of longhorn beetles and hoverflies in Belgian deciduous forests
Fayt, P.; Dufrêne, Marc ULg; Branquart, E. et al

in Journal of Insect Conservation (2006), 10(2), 129-150

Although both saproxylic longhorn beetles and hoverflies benefit from the presence of woody substrates for reproduction, they differ in their requirements for floral resources and for microbiotopes of ... [more ▼]

Although both saproxylic longhorn beetles and hoverflies benefit from the presence of woody substrates for reproduction, they differ in their requirements for floral resources and for microbiotopes of overmature and senescent trees. This led us to expect contrasting responses between the two species groups in relation to these essential resources. We examined this prediction in 22 mature oak- and beech-dominated stands of southern Belgium by relating their species assemblages to local vegetation structure and composition, altitude and landscape composition. Stands were organised in pairs as a function of their overall dead wood supply. Free-hanging window traps, stump emergence traps and Malaise traps produced 30 longhorn beetle species (1637 individuals) and 106 hoverfly species (3020 individuals). Paired-comparisons controlling for annual variation in captures showed that, unlike saproxylic hoverflies, stands with dead wood hosted more species and individuals of longhorn beetles. Accordingly, the two species groups were found to be independent on ordination axes, responding to different sets of environmental conditions. While stands dominated by oaks with a high snag volume were highly favoured by longhorn beetles, saproxylic and threatened syrphids were limited to open-stands with large trees and a well-developed, species rich herb layer providing the floral resources required for their reproduction. Our results suggest that, when defining criteria to identify or restore important habitats for saproxylic insect conservation, variables related to different aspects of dead wood supply should not be the only criteria taken into account. © Springer 2006. [less ▲]

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See detailContrasting silicon uptakes by coniferous trees: a hydroponic experiment on young seedlings
Cornelis, Jean-Thomas ULg; Delvaux, Bruno; Titeux, Hugues

in Plant and Soil (2010), 336(1-2), 99-106

Abstract : Silicon uptake by terrestrial plants impacts the Si land-ocean fluxes, therefore inducing significant modifications for biogeochemical cycle of Si. Understanding the mechanisms that control Si ... [more ▼]

Abstract : Silicon uptake by terrestrial plants impacts the Si land-ocean fluxes, therefore inducing significant modifications for biogeochemical cycle of Si. Understanding the mechanisms that control Si uptakes by forest vegetation is of great interest for the study of the global Si cycle as the world's total forest area corresponds to about 30% of the land area. Our study compares Si uptake in controlled conditions by two coniferous species (Pseudotsuga menziensii and Pinus nigra) exhibiting contrasting Si uptake in the field. For this purpose, seedlings were grown for 11 weeks under controlled conditions in hydroponics with different Si concentrations (0.2 to 1.6 mM) in nutrient solutions. The Si concentrations were greater in Douglas fir leaves as compared with Black pine leaves and increased, depending on the Si concentration in the nutrient solution. According to mass balance, Si absorption seems to have been driven by passive Si transport at 0.2 mM Si (realistic concentration for forest soil solutions) and was rejective at higher Si concentrations in nutrient solution for both species. For this reason, we attributed the higher Si concentration in Douglas fir leaves to the greater cumulative transpiration of these seedlings. We suggest that contrasting transpiration rates may also play a key role in controlling Si accumulation in leaves at field scale. [less ▲]

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See detailContrasting the role of Ih and ICaT currents in post-inhibitory rebound mechanisms in reciprocal-inhibitory networks
Dethier, Julie ULg; Drion, Guillaume ULg; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

Poster (2014, November 16)

Models with reciprocal inhibition are ubiquitous in the literature. For instance, common rhythmic motor behaviors produced by central pattern generators (CPGs) involve half-center oscillators, which ... [more ▼]

Models with reciprocal inhibition are ubiquitous in the literature. For instance, common rhythmic motor behaviors produced by central pattern generators (CPGs) involve half-center oscillators, which consist of two inhibitory neurons that are not endogenous oscillators, but produce rhythmic outputs when reciprocally connected (Marder & Calabrese 1996). Models of thalamocortical spindle oscillations also suggest that the rhythm originates from the thalamic reticular nucleus, which consists in interacting inhibitory nonoscillatory neurons (Wang & Rinzel 1992). [less ▲]

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See detailContrasting Two Ways of Making Psychology: Brentano and Freud
Gyemant, Maria ULg

Conference (2012, November 01)

Brentano’s views on psychology influenced the way philosophy was made at the beginning of the 20th century. But did this influence spread as far as to give place to Freud’s revolutionary discovery of the ... [more ▼]

Brentano’s views on psychology influenced the way philosophy was made at the beginning of the 20th century. But did this influence spread as far as to give place to Freud’s revolutionary discovery of the psychoanalytical unconscious? We know that Sigmund Freud attended enthusiastically Brentano’s lectures between 1874 and 1876. Yet, since Brentano’s name is never mentioned in Freud’s later, properly psychoanalytical writings, there is a very convincing argument for stating that Brentano had no lasting influence on Freud. Furthermore, Freud’s theory of the unconscious doesn’t seem to continue, but rather to oppose Brentano’s psychological views. Yet, as it was shown lately by a number of philosophers there are reasons to believe that Brentano had a profound influence on Freud. An attentive analysis of Freud’s vocabulary as well as his arguments against “philosophical” objections supports this point rather convincingly. However, Freud was not a philosopher and Brentano’s historical influence does not suffice to transform the Freudian unconscious in a philosophical concept. It is the purpose of this paper to sketch a way to make a philosophical use of Freud’s unconscious by reconstructing the dialogue between Brentano and Freud on a conceptual level. First, I will explain the differences between Brentano and Freud’s psychology. While Brentano and even the most original of his students thought the mind is entirely conscious, and they only called “unconscious” certain intermittences of this consciousness, Freud’s metapsychology rests on the supposition that the mind is primarily unconscious and it is consciousness that appears locally as a quality of certain mental events. In the second part of my paper I will show that this opposition is not as radical as it seems. Freud’s metapsychological supposition of an unconscious mind is not merely stated but proven by clinical facts. And these facts allow Freud to substitute a dynamic approach of the mental to a descriptive psychology of Brentanian inspiration: a mental state is only conscious because it becomes thus by passing from an unconscious to a conscious state. It is this change in the point of view that allows Freud to see mental events as processes rather than mere states. Thus, the results of Brentano’s descriptive psychology are not denied but rather completed by Freud’s dynamic theory of the unconscious. The purpose of this paper is thus to clarify not only Freud’s historical relation to Brentano, but also the relation of his metapsychology to Brentano’s descriptive psychology and to all psychology that takes Freud’s discovery of the unconscious seriously. Despite the explicit critique of the unconscious that we find in the Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint, I think that Freud never truly opposed Brentano. He rather took Brentano’s descriptive psychology a step further: he introduced a dynamic component to the analysis of the psyche that could throw light on the blind spots in Brentano’s psychology. [less ▲]

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