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See detailLa cultura en México (1950-1972)
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULg

in L'ordinaire. Mexique Amérique Centrale (1992), 138

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
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See detailLa Cultura en México (1959-1972) (II)
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULg

in Artes. Educación/Investigación/Crítica (1989), 13

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
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See detailLa Cultura en México (1959-1972)
Vanden Berghe, Kristine ULg

in Artes. Educación/Investigación/Crítica (1989), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
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See detailCultura escrita en sociedades tradicionales
Goody, Jack; Vitale, Gloria; Willson, Patricia ULg

Book published by Editorial Gedisa (1996)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 ULg)
See detailCultura, pensamiento y escritura
Bottéro, Jean; Vandermeersch, Léon; Lapacherie, Jean-Gérard et al

Book published by Editorial Gedisa (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (9 ULg)
See detailthe Cultural Borders
Born, Michel ULg

in Isacchini, M. (Ed.) Frontiera (2000)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
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See detailCultural characteristics, pathogenicity and vegetative compatibility of Fusarium udum isolates from pigeonpea (Cajanus Cajan (L.) Millsp.) in Kenya
Kiprop, E. K.; Mwang'Ombe, A. W.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg et al

in European Journal of Plant Pathology (2002), 108(2), 147-154

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (2 ULg)
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See detailCultural diversity and Subsidiarity: more of the same or conflicting principles ? The case of cultural tourism in the European Union
Dumont, Elisabeth; Teller, Jacques ULg

in European Studies : A Journal of European Culture, History & Politics (2007), 24

This article takes the example of cultural tourism to highlight the specificities of European Cultural Policies. It argues, that, although it is often presented as a way of supporting a diversity of ... [more ▼]

This article takes the example of cultural tourism to highlight the specificities of European Cultural Policies. It argues, that, although it is often presented as a way of supporting a diversity of approaches, styles and objectives, the subsidiarity principle can sometimes endanger the cultural diversity it seeks to protect. Tourism for instance, has long been considered as a self-regulating activity and cultural tourism is often considered as “sustainable by nature”. Experience however shows that local authorities often lack an understanding of all the intricacies and consequences of cultural tourism development. Without proper tools for assessing and preventing negative impacts, local actors may lose control over its development, miss on benefit and endanger the diversity of cultures currently existing and co-existing in the European Union. [less ▲]

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See detailCultural Marxism in the Anglo-Saxon radical right literature
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

in Jackson, Paul (Ed.) The Postwar Anglo-American Far Right: A Special Relationship of Hate (in press)

This chapter will analyze the place of the threat alleged of Cultural Marxism in the discourse of the radical and extreme right, in the United States as well as in continental Europe and the United ... [more ▼]

This chapter will analyze the place of the threat alleged of Cultural Marxism in the discourse of the radical and extreme right, in the United States as well as in continental Europe and the United Kingdom. The underlying aim of this chapter is to examine the determinant role that this ‘threat’ plays in the Anglo Saxon extreme right, in particular at the intellectual, ideological and doctrinal levels, in comparison to other countries. Certainly if the Netherlands, France or other countries have parties or political groups which borrow the rhetoric of ‘fighting’ against Cultural Marxism, or its more nebulous variant, ‘political correctness’, it certainly finds its origins in the United States, and more broadly the Anglo-Saxon world. To achieve this, the chapter will begin by unpicking the meanings behind the notion of Cultural Marxism, from its origins to its use in Anders Breivik’s manifesto released shortly before the Oslo and UtØya massacres. It will show that the term emerged from the literature of American ultraconservatives following the fall of the Berlin Wall as a consequence of the disappearance of the ‘red menace’ of Communism. Secondly, it will focus on two important moments in the development of the term. It will describe the phrase’s usage from the beginning of the 2000s within the discourse of Pat Buchanan, a political commentator and multiple U.S. presidential candidate. Then it will illustrate the re-emergence of the term some 10 years later, in the manifesto of Anders Breivik and in the subsequent justification of his acts throughout his trial. In both cases, we will see that Buchanan and Breivik emphasize the same basic theme, Cultural Marxism, in their denouncement of what they see as two different threats. Finally, from these explorations of the usage of the term, the discussion will examine other current uses of the notion of ‘Cultural Marxism’ in the British and American radical right. To conclude, it will show how the ‘Cultural Marxism’ threats are used by a variety of activists to argue for the defence of their political standpoints, setting this in a language of preserving freedom and democracy, but ultimately only within a framework designed to defend Judeo-Christian values. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULg)
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See detailCultural Marxism in the Anglo-Saxon radical right literature
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
See detailCultural Policies and minorities artistic expressions: comparing Liège and Naples
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Scientific conference (2014, March 14)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
See detail“The cultural politics of migrant labour rights in South China: from narrating the “dagong” to online boundary-spanning”
Florence, Eric ULg

Scientific conference (2012, September 05)

For the last two decades, in a context of combined flexible capitalism and “decentralized legal authoritarianism” (Lee Ching-Kwan, Against the Law), factories of the Pearl River Delta have been witnessing ... [more ▼]

For the last two decades, in a context of combined flexible capitalism and “decentralized legal authoritarianism” (Lee Ching-Kwan, Against the Law), factories of the Pearl River Delta have been witnessing a growing spate of collective actions by rural migrant workers. In this paper the narrative categories and “frames of contention” mobilized by migrant workers in claim-making will be investigated. The focus is put chiefly on two differently mediated genres of narratives, i.e. migrant workers’ narratives in magazines on the one hand, and more recent online written practices centred on the politics of rights and identity on the other hand. Such cultural politics of migrant labour has been insufficiently taken into account when considering the greater right awareness and surge in collective mobilization in China for the last decade. The paper develops the argument that workers’ written practices within magazines help constituting a space for struggle and negotiation around major values, state polities and legislation linked to workers’ rights. Secondly, drawing on the notion of “disorderly media” (Latham), it is argued that some of the online written practices by migrant workers may provide platforms for more radical articulations of the politics of rights and collective mobilization. What are the points of discursive rupture and contention around which processes of reversal, reapropriation, affirmation or euphemization occur? What kinds of material, socioeconomic and political relations do these identification and legitimization processes reveal? These are the questions that will be investigated. A vast body of data are used for this paper, including songs and poems by rural workers, participant observation, in-depth interviews, published and unpublished letters to the editor of several migrants’ magazines, etc. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
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See detailCultural tourism in European Cities: Towards a strategic planning approach
Teller, Jacques ULg; Dumont, E.; Ruelle, Christine ULg

in Proc. of the conference Life in the Urban Landscape (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (8 ULg)
See detailCulturalisation des différences, différenciation des cultures dans la politique belge
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Book published by Les Cahiers du CERI (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
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See detailLa culturalisation du politique
Jacquemain, Marc ULg

Article for general public (2012)

Les valeurs que nous croyons enracinées dans une partie du champ idéologique deviennent de plus en plus nomade. On examine brièvement pourquoi la laïcité, valeur historiquement portée par la gauche, est ... [more ▼]

Les valeurs que nous croyons enracinées dans une partie du champ idéologique deviennent de plus en plus nomade. On examine brièvement pourquoi la laïcité, valeur historiquement portée par la gauche, est aujourd'hui intégréee au dispositif idéologique de la droite la plus radicale. On examine brièvement le cas de la laïcité. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 264 (13 ULg)
See detailCulture alimentaire et développement durable
Duquesne, Brigitte ULg

Conference (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
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See detailCulture and Gender do not Dissolve into how Scientists “read” Nature: Thelma Rowell’s Heterodoxy
Despret, Vinciane ULg

in Oren Harman (Ed.) Rebels, Mavericks, and Heretics in Biology (2009)

From her very first descriptions of the baboons (in the sixties), Thelma Rowell’s observations contrasted sharply with those of her colleagues (mostly males) working with similar animals. Numerous ... [more ▼]

From her very first descriptions of the baboons (in the sixties), Thelma Rowell’s observations contrasted sharply with those of her colleagues (mostly males) working with similar animals. Numerous observers among primatologists and science studies scholars have suggested that women observed differently. For some, womens’ patience makes them ideal observers. Rowell insisted that her challenging ideas about dominance relationships in primates were a result of her having been trained always to question authority. Roswell’s distinction lay in doing the same sorts of things others scientists were doing but for far longer, which enabled her to see more and different results. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 ULg)