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See detailThe Composition of the Inflammatory Infiltrate in Three Cases of Polyneuritis Equi
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Cassart, Dominique ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2008), 40(2), 185-8

Polyneuritis equi (PNE) is a rare neurological disease in the horse. Because of the suspicion in PNE of a T-lymphocyte mediated immune response against the myelin, the objective of this study was to ... [more ▼]

Polyneuritis equi (PNE) is a rare neurological disease in the horse. Because of the suspicion in PNE of a T-lymphocyte mediated immune response against the myelin, the objective of this study was to determine the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate in the involved nerves of 3 horses with PNE, studied retrospectively. T-lymphocytes were demonstrated in the lesions, which suggests a T-lymphocyte mediated immune response against myelin. In addition, the presence of B-lymphocytes indicated a local production of antibodies. More research, involving a prospective study, is needed to determine whether the T-lymphocytes are cytotoxic or T-helper lymphocytes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe composition of the Venus clouds and implications for model atmospheres
Bottema, Murk; Plummer, William; Strong, John et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (1965), 70(17), 4401--4402

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See detailComposition of the walls of stem and leaves of vitrifying carnation
Kevers, Claire ULg; Goldberg, R.; Chu-Ba, J. et al

in Biologia Plantarum (1988), 30(3), 219-223

Vitrification of stem explants of carnation was brought about by culturing in liquid medium. Cellulose and lignin levels were decreased in vitrified stems and leaves. Isolated cell walls of vitrified ... [more ▼]

Vitrification of stem explants of carnation was brought about by culturing in liquid medium. Cellulose and lignin levels were decreased in vitrified stems and leaves. Isolated cell walls of vitrified tissues were also characterized by low calcium content, low Ca2+/uronic acids ratio, low ratio of uronic acids to neutral sugars due to higher amounts of the latters. All these characteristics may account for the high wall plastic potential previously measured in vitrifying internodes. © 1988 Academia. [less ▲]

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See detailComposition of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. rich essential oils from Cameroon and identification of a minor diterpene: ent-13-epi manoyl oxide.
Noudjou, Félicité; Kouninki, Habiba; Hance, Thierry et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2007), 11(3), 193-199

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See detailComposition saline du sang et des tissus des animaux marins
Fredericq, Léon ULg

in Annales de la Société de Médecine de Gand (1884)

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See detailCompositional and kinetic controls on liquid immiscibility in ferrobasalt-rhyolite volcanic and plutonic series
Charlier, Bernard ULg; Namur, O.; Grove, T. L.

in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2013), 113

We present major element compositions of basalts and their differentiation products for some major tholeiitic series. The dry, low-pressure liquid lines of descent are shown to approach or intersect the ... [more ▼]

We present major element compositions of basalts and their differentiation products for some major tholeiitic series. The dry, low-pressure liquid lines of descent are shown to approach or intersect the experimentally-defined compositional space of silicate liquid immiscibility. Ferrobasalt-rhyolite unmixing along tholeiitic trends in both volcanic and plutonic environments is supported by worldwide occurrence of immiscible globules in the mesostasis of erupted basalts, unmixed melt inclusions in cumulus phases of major layered intrusions such as Skaergaard and Sept Iles, and oxide-rich ferrogabbros closely associated with plagiogranites in the lower oceanic crust. Liquid immiscibility is promoted by low-pressure, anhydrous fractional crystallization that drives the low Al2O3, high FeO liquids into the two-liquid field. Kinetic controls can be important in the development of two-liquid separation. The undercooling that occurs at the slow cooling rates of plutonic environments promotes early development of liquid immiscibility at higher temperature. In contrast rapid cooling in erupted lavas leads to large undercoolings and liquid immiscibility develops at significantly lower temperatures. Unmixing leads to the development of a compositional gap characterized by the absence of intermediate compositions, a feature of many tholeiitic provinces. The compositions of experimental unmixed silica-rich melts coincide with those of natural rhyolites and plagiogranites with high FeOtot and low Al2O3, suggesting the potential role of large-scale separation of immiscible Si-rich liquid in the petrogenesis of late-stage residual melts. No trace of the paired ferrobasaltic melt is found in volcanic environments because of its uneruptable characteristics. Instead, Fe-Ti±P-rich gabbros are the cumulate products of immiscible Fe-rich melts in plutonic settings. The immiscibility process may be difficult to identify because both melts crystallize the same phases with the same compositions. The two liquids might form incompletely segregated emulsions so that both liquids continue to exchange as they crystallize and remain in equilibrium. Even if segregated, both melts evolve on the binodal surface and exsolve continuously with decreasing temperature. The two liquids do not differentiate independently and keep crystallizing the same phases with differentiation. Further evolution by fractional crystallization potentially drives the bulk liquid out of the two-liquid field so that very late-stage liquids could evolve into the single melt phase stability field. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailThe compositional evolution of C/2012 S1 (ISON) from ground-based high-resolution infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign
Dello Russo, N.; Vervack, R. J.; Kawakita, H. et al

in Icarus (2016), 266

Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ∼ 2.5 × 10[SUP]4[/SUP ... [more ▼]

Volatile production rates, relative abundances, rotational temperatures, and spatial distributions in the coma were measured in C/2012 S1 (ISON) using long-slit high-dispersion (λ/Δλ ∼ 2.5 × 10[SUP]4[/SUP]) infrared spectroscopy as part of a worldwide observing campaign. Spectra were obtained on UT 2013 October 26 and 28 with NIRSPEC at the W.M. Keck Observatory, and UT 2013 November 19 and 20 with CSHELL at the NASA IRTF. H[SUB]2[/SUB]O was detected on all dates, with production rates increasing markedly from (8.7 ± 1.5) × 10[SUP]27[/SUP] molecules s[SUP]-1[/SUP] on October 26 (R[SUB]h[/SUB] = 1.12 AU) to (3.7 ± 0.4) × 10[SUP]29[/SUP] molecules s[SUP]-1[/SUP] on November 20 (R[SUB]h[/SUB] = 0.43 AU). Short-term variability of H[SUB]2[/SUB]O production is also seen as observations on November 19 show an increase in H[SUB]2[/SUB]O production rate of nearly a factor of two over a period of about 6 h. C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]6[/SUB], CH[SUB]3[/SUB]OH and CH[SUB]4[/SUB] abundances in ISON are slightly depleted relative to H[SUB]2[/SUB]O when compared to mean values for comets measured at infrared wavelengths. On the November dates, C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]2[/SUB], HCN and OCS abundances relative to H[SUB]2[/SUB]O appear to be within the range of mean values, whereas H[SUB]2[/SUB]CO and NH[SUB]3[/SUB] were significantly enhanced. There is evidence that the abundances with respect to H[SUB]2[/SUB]O increased for some species but not others between October 28 (R[SUB]h[/SUB] = 1.07 AU) and November 19 (R[SUB]h[/SUB] = 0.46 AU). The high mixing ratios of H[SUB]2[/SUB]CO/CH[SUB]3[/SUB]OH and C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]2[/SUB]/C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]6[/SUB] on November 19, and changes in the mixing ratios of some species with respect to H[SUB]2[/SUB]O between October 28 to November 19, indicates compositional changes that may be the result of a transition from sampling radiation-processed outer layers in this dynamically new comet to sampling more pristine natal material as the outer processed layer was increasingly eroded and the thermal wave propagated into the nucleus as the comet approached perihelion for the first time. On November 19 and 20, the spatial distribution for dust appears asymmetric and enhanced in the antisolar direction, whereas spatial distributions for volatiles (excepting CN) appear symmetric with their peaks slightly offset in the sunward direction compared to the dust. Spatial distributions for H[SUB]2[/SUB]O, HCN, C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]6[/SUB], C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]2[/SUB], and H[SUB]2[/SUB]CO on November 19 show no definitive evidence for significant contributions from extended sources; however, broader spatial distributions for NH[SUB]3[/SUB] and OCS may be consistent with extended sources for these species. Abundances of HCN and C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]2[/SUB] on November 19 and 20 are insufficient to account for reported abundances of CN and C[SUB]2[/SUB] in ISON near this time. Differences in HCN and CN spatial distributions are also consistent with HCN as only a minor source of CN in ISON on November 19 as the spatial distribution of CN in the coma suggests a dominant distributed source that is correlated with dust and not volatile release. The spatial distributions for NH[SUB]3[/SUB] and NH[SUB]2[/SUB] are similar, suggesting that NH[SUB]3[/SUB] is the primary source of NH[SUB]2[/SUB] with no evidence of a significant dust source of NH[SUB]2[/SUB]; however, the higher production rates derived for NH[SUB]3[/SUB] compared to NH[SUB]2[/SUB] on November 19 and 20 remain unexplained. This suggests a more complete analysis that treats NH[SUB]2[/SUB] as a distributed source and accounts for its emission mechanism is needed for future work. [less ▲]

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See detailCompositional protein analysis of HDL by SELDI-TOF MS during experimental endotoxemia
Levels, Johannes HM; Marée, Raphaël ULg; Geurts, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2008)

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See detailCompositional Specification of ODP Binding Objects
Février, Arnaud; Najm, Elie; Leduc, Guy ULg et al

in Information Network and Data Communication (1996, June)

A building blocks approach for the formal specification of binding objects in the ODP Computational Model is presented. The formal notation that is used is based on LOTOS extended with two features - real ... [more ▼]

A building blocks approach for the formal specification of binding objects in the ODP Computational Model is presented. The formal notation that is used is based on LOTOS extended with two features - real time and gate passing. These features are among the extensions that are currently studied in the ISO standardisation Formal Description Techniques group. We apply our building blocks approach to the specification of a multicast, multimedia binding object. [less ▲]

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See detailCompositional, Physical, Antioxidant and Sensory Characteristics of Novel Syrup from Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)
Ben Thabet, I.; Besbes, S.; Masmoudi, M. et al

in Food Science & Technology International (2009), 15(6), 583-590

This study is a contribution to valorise date palm sap (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by elaboration of high quality syrup. Sap was concentrated by evaporation and the obtained product was characterized by its ... [more ▼]

This study is a contribution to valorise date palm sap (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by elaboration of high quality syrup. Sap was concentrated by evaporation and the obtained product was characterized by its physicochemical, rheological, thermal, sensory properties and by its antioxidant activity. Syrups from date palm sap have a good nutritional value marked by high amounts of sugars (58-75 g/100 g fresh matter basis), minerals (2.1-2.6 g/100 g fresh matter basis) and phenolics (147.61-224.55 mg of ferulic acid equivalents/kg fresh weight). Syrup also presents an antioxidant activity that appears related to total phenolic content. Rheological properties indicate that syrup preserves a Newtonian behavior from 10 degrees C to 55 degrees C well modeled by Arrhenius equation. Hedonic evaluation showed that consumers' appreciation of date palm syrup was not significantly different to the most known sap syrup: maple syrup. [less ▲]

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See detailCompositions for use against one or more pathogens
Pujos, Philippe; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Patent (2007)

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See detailCompost Pile Monitoring Using Different Approaches:GC-MS, E-nose and dynamic olfactometry
Gutierrez, M. C.; Chica, A. F.; Martin, M. A. et al

in Waste and Biomass Valorization (2014), 5(3), 469-479

The evaluation of odour emissions associated to the composting process is complex because these emissions depend on several factors such as the raw material to be composted, the different stages of the ... [more ▼]

The evaluation of odour emissions associated to the composting process is complex because these emissions depend on several factors such as the raw material to be composted, the different stages of the composting process, meteorological conditions, and others. For this reason, the aim of this paper is to compare complementary approaches to monitor odours. The odour source selected for this study is green waste compost at different maturity stages. The study site is a composting facility located in the south of Belgium. The compared approaches were: a portable e-nose developed by the Environmental Monitoring Research team (Arlon, Belgium) to monitor odorous emissions from the composting piles; chemical analyses performed in the laboratory using a GC–MS (manufactured by Thermo) to analyse volatile organic compounds which were collected by active sampling on Tenax TA sorbent simultaneously to the in situ e-nose measurements and olfactometric measurements to determine the odour concentration (ouE/m3) using the Odile olfactometer (Odotech). The portable e-nose was also used in the laboratory with compost odour samples collected in bags. The large numbers of data sets obtained were explored by statistical methods such as principal components analysis. The results obtained highlight the advantages of monitoring the composting process with these three approaches. Each approach gives different information about the composting process and the emissions generated. While the e-nose is capable of identifying some chemical family emissions and some activities such as turning steps, the GC–MS identifies each chemical compound emitted and dynamic olfactometry quantifies the odour concentration (ouE/m3) in relationship with these emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailCompost pile monitoring with GC-MS, e-nose and olfactometry : comparison of different approaches
Gutierrez, M.C.; Chica, A.F; Romain, Anne-Claude ULg

in Trémier, Anne; Dabert, Patrick; Druilhe, Céline (Eds.) et al Book of abstracts of the 8th international conference ORBIT2012 (2012)

This paper proposes a comparison of complementary approaches to monitor the odours : e-nose, olfactometry and GC-MS. The odour source selected for this study is a green waste compost at different maturity ... [more ▼]

This paper proposes a comparison of complementary approaches to monitor the odours : e-nose, olfactometry and GC-MS. The odour source selected for this study is a green waste compost at different maturity stages. The study site is a composting facility, located in the south of Belgium. [less ▲]

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See detailLe compostage, une pratique meconnue de gestion des dechets.
Culot, Marc ULg; Lebeau, S.

in Bulletin d'Information (Association Royale des Ingénieurs Issus de la Fusagx - Aigx) (1999), 5

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See detailCompound droplet manipulations on fiber arrays
Weyer, Floriane ULg; Lismont, Marjorie ULg; Dreesen, Laurent ULg et al

in Soft Matter (2015), 11

Recent works demonstrated that fiber arrays may constitute new means of designing open digital microfluidic systems. Various processes, such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, release, mixing and ... [more ▼]

Recent works demonstrated that fiber arrays may constitute new means of designing open digital microfluidic systems. Various processes, such as droplet motion, fragmentation, trapping, release, mixing and encapsulation, may be achieved on fiber arrays. However, handling a large number of tiny droplets resulting from the mixing of several liquid components is required for developing microreactors, smart sensors or microemulsifying drugs. Here, we show that the manipulation of tiny droplets onto fiber networks allows for creating compound droplets with a high complexity level. Moreover, this cost-effective and adjustable method may also be implemented with optical fibers in order to develop fluorescence-based biosensor. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (12 ULg)