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See detailClinical Activity and Benefit of Irinotecan (CPT-11) in Patients with Colorectal Cancer Truly Resistant to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)
Van Cutsem, Eric; Cunningham, D.; Ten Bokkel Huinink, W. W. et al

in European Journal of Cancer (1999), 35

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See detailClinical activity of afatinib (BIBW 2992) in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with mutations in the kinase domain of HER2/neu.
De Greve, J.; Teugels, E.; Geers, C. et al

in Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) (2012), 76(1), 123-7

Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2/neu kinase domain mutations are found in approximately 1-4% of lung adenocarcinomas with a similar phenotype to tumors with epidermal growth factor receptor ... [more ▼]

Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2/neu kinase domain mutations are found in approximately 1-4% of lung adenocarcinomas with a similar phenotype to tumors with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. Afatinib is a potent irreversible ErbB family blocker. We determined the tumor genomic status of the EGFR and HER2 genes in non- or light smokers with lung adenocarcinoma in patients who were entered into an exploratory Phase II study with afatinib. Five patients with a non-smoking history and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas bearing mutations in the kinase domain of HER2 gene were identified, three of which were evaluable for response. Objective response was observed in all three patients, even after failure of other EGFR- and/or HER2-targeted treatments; the case histories of these patients are described in this report. These findings suggest that afatinib is a potential novel treatment option for this subgroup of patients, even when other EGFR and HER2 targeting treatments have failed. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical added-value of 18FDG PET in neuroendocrine-merkel cell carcinoma
Belhocine, Tarik; Pierard, Gérald ULg; Frühling, Janos et al

in Oncology Reports (2006), 16(2), 347-352

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly malignant skin cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation. We studied the potential value of 18FDG PET in the management of MCC. Eleven patients with MCC ... [more ▼]

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly malignant skin cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation. We studied the potential value of 18FDG PET in the management of MCC. Eleven patients with MCC were examined by 18FDG PET and PET-CT for staging purpose (n=4) or for detection of recurrence (n=7). Qualitative and quantitative interpretation of PET studies was performed routinely. 18FDG PET observations were compared to clinical and radiological findings. In 6 patients, PET findings were also compared to histology. In 7 patients, the 18FDG tumor uptake was compared to the MCC proliferative activity expressed by the Ki-67 index. 18FDG PET was contributive in 10/11 MCC patients. In 7 patients, 18FDG PET detected focal lesions or a disseminated stage of the disease including dermal, nodal and visceral metastases. In 3 patients, a normal 18FDG PET confirmed complete remission of disease. Most MCC patients exhibited highly 18FDG-avid sites suggestive of increased glucose metabolism. This imaging pattern was related to a high proliferative activity (Ki-67 index >50%). In 1 patient with a weakly proliferative nodal MCC (Ki-67<10%), a false negative result was yielded by metabolic imaging. In 4/11 patients, 18FDG PET revealed an unsuspected second neoplasm in addition to MCC. It is concluded that whole-body 18FDG PET may be useful in the management of MCC patients. However, a normal 18FDG PET aspect cannot rule out MCC with low proliferative activity. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical and angiographic analysis with a Cobalt Alloy Coronary Stent (Driver) in stable and unstable angina pectoris
LEGRAND, Victor ULg; Kelbaek, H.; Hauptmann, K. E. et al

in American Journal of Cardiology (2006), 97(3), 349-352

The Clinical and Angiographic analysis with a Cobalt Alloy Coronary Stent (Driver) (CLASS) study was a prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter study designed to assess the safety and efficacy of a cobalt ... [more ▼]

The Clinical and Angiographic analysis with a Cobalt Alloy Coronary Stent (Driver) (CLASS) study was a prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter study designed to assess the safety and efficacy of a cobalt-chromium alloy-based stent in patients with stable or unstable angina pectoris. A total of 203 lesions were treated in 202 enrolled patients. The percentage of major adverse cardiac event-free patients was 87.6% (177 of 202) at 6 months (primary safety end point; major adverse cardiac events were defined as death, myocardial infarction, emergency bypass surgery, or target lesion revascularization [percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting]). The angiographic success rate (primary efficacy end point) was 100%, and the procedural success rate was 98%. The binary in-stent restenosis rate at 6 months was 12.6%. Our results have demonstrated that the Driver cobalt-chromium alloy stent can be used with a low 6-month incidence of major adverse cardiac events, a low 6-month binary restenosis rate, and high angiographic and procedural success rates. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical and angiographic outcome of elective stent implantation in small coronary vessels: an analysis of the BENESTENT trial.
Keane, D.; Azar, A. J.; de Jaegere, P. et al

in Seminars in interventional cardiology : SIIC (1996), 1(4), 255-62

We examined the influence of vessel size using an intention-to-treat approach in 259 patients who underwent stent implantation and in 257 patients who underwent balloon angioplasty alone in the BENESTENT ... [more ▼]

We examined the influence of vessel size using an intention-to-treat approach in 259 patients who underwent stent implantation and in 257 patients who underwent balloon angioplasty alone in the BENESTENT trial. In the stented population, smaller vessel size was associated with a higher stent:vessel ratio, a greater relative gain and a greater subsequent loss index, and a higher risk of adverse cardiac events. In the balloon angioplasty population small vessel size conveyed an increased requirement for revascularization but did not increase the risk of procedural failure or myocardial infarction during follow-up. Logistic regression indicated that decreasing vessel size (as a continous variable) was associated with an increasing risk of a cardiac event for both the stent and balloon angioplasty populations. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical and biological determinants of sclerostin plasma concentration in hemodialysis patients
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; KRZESINSKI, Jean-Marie ULg; Warling, Xavier et al

in Nephron. Clinical Practice (2014), 128

Background: Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of bone formation, but the meaning of its serum levels remains undetermined. We evaluated the association between sclerostin levels and clinical or biological ... [more ▼]

Background: Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of bone formation, but the meaning of its serum levels remains undetermined. We evaluated the association between sclerostin levels and clinical or biological data in hemodialyzed patients (HD), notably parathormone (PTH), biomarkers of bone turnover, vascular calcifications and mortality after 2 years. Methods: 164 HD patients were included in this observational study. The calcification score was assessed with the Kauppila method. Patients were followed for 2 years. Results: Median sclerostin levels were significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in HD versus healthy subjects (n = 94) (1,375 vs. 565 pg/ml, respectively). In univariate analysis a significant association (p < 0.05) was found between sclerostin and age, height, dialysis vintage, albumin, troponin, homocysteine, PTH, C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteoprotegerin, but not with the calcification score. In a multivariate model, the association remained with age, height, dialysis vintage, troponin, homocysteine, phosphate, PTH, but also with vascular calcifications. Association was positive for all variables, except PTH and vascular calcifications. The baseline sclerostin concentration was not different in survivors and non-survivors. Conclusions: We confirm a higher concentration of sclerostin in HD patients, a positive association with age and a negative association with PTH. A positive association with phosphate, homocysteine and troponin calls for additional research. The clinical interest of sclerostin to assess vascular calcifications in HD is limited and no association was found between sclerostin and mortality. [less ▲]

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of non-adherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2009, October), 60(number 10 (suppl.)), 328

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of non-adherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Health Policy (2010), 96

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate the clinical and economic burden of non-adherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients and the potential cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to estimate the clinical and economic burden of non-adherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients and the potential cost-effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions. METHODS: A validated Markov microsimulation model estimated costs and outcomes (i.e. the number of fractures and the quality-adjusted life-year (QALY)) for three adherence scenarios: no treatment, real-world adherence and full adherence over 3 years. The real-world adherence scenario employed data from a published observational study. The incremental cost per QALY gained was estimated and compared across the three adherence scenarios. RESULTS: The number of fractures prevented and the QALY gain obtained at real-world adherence levels represented only 38.2% and 40.7% of those expected with full adherence, respectively. The cost per QALY gained of real-world adherence compared with no treatment was estimated at euro10279, and full adherence was found to be cost-saving compared with real-world adherence. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that more than half of the potential clinical benefits from oral bisphosphonates in patients with osteoporosis are lost due to poor adherence with treatment. Depending on their cost, interventions with improved adherence to therapy have the potential to be an attractive use of resources. [less ▲]

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of nonadherence with oral bisphosphonates in osteoporotic patients
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2009, June), 68(S3), 667

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of nonadherence with osteoporosis medications
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Value in Health (2009, October), 12(7), 444

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of poor adherence and persistence with osteoporosis medications in Ireland.
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; McGowan, Bernie; Bennett, Kathleen et al

in Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (2012), 15(5), 604-12

OBJECTIVES: Medication nonadherence is common for osteoporosis, but its consequences have not been well described. This study aimed to quantify the clinical and economic impacts of poor adherence and to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Medication nonadherence is common for osteoporosis, but its consequences have not been well described. This study aimed to quantify the clinical and economic impacts of poor adherence and to evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of improving patient adherence by using hypothetical behavioral interventions. METHODS: A previously validated Markov microsimulation model was adapted to the Irish setting to estimate lifetime costs and outcomes (fractures and quality-adjusted life-year [QALY]) for three adherence scenarios: no treatment, real-world adherence, and full adherence over 3 years. The real-world scenario employed adherence and persistence data from the Irish Health Services Executive-Primary Care Reimbursement Services pharmacy claims database. We also investigated the cost-effectiveness of hypothetical behavioral interventions to improve medication adherence (according to their cost and effect on adherence). RESULTS: The number of fractures prevented and the QALY gain obtained at real-world adherence levels represented only 57% and 56% of those expected with full adherence, respectively. The costs per QALY gained of real-world adherence and of full adherence compared with no treatment were estimated at euro 11,834 and euro 6,341, respectively. An intervention to improve adherence by 25% would result in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of euro 11,511 per QALY and euro 54,182 per QALY, compared with real-world adherence, if the intervention cost an additional euro 50 and euro 100 per year, respectively. DISCUSSION: Poor adherence with osteoporosis medications results in around a 50% reduction in the potential benefits observed in clinical trials and a doubling of the cost per QALY gained from these medications. Depending on their costs and outcomes, programs to improve adherence have the potential to be an efficient use of resources. [less ▲]

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See detailThe clinical and economic burden of poor adherence with osteoporosis medications in Ireland
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; McGowan, Bernie; Bennett, Kathleen et al

in Value in Health (2011), 14

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See detailClinical and economic impact of diabetes mellitus on percutaneous and surgical treatment of multivessel coronary disease patients: insights from the Arterial Revascularization Therapy Study (ARTS) trial.
Abizaid, A.; Costa, M. A.; Centemero, M. et al

in Circulation (2001), 104(5), 533-8

BACKGROUND: Our aims were to compare coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and stenting for the treatment of diabetic patients with multivessel coronary disease enrolled in the Arterial Revascularization ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Our aims were to compare coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and stenting for the treatment of diabetic patients with multivessel coronary disease enrolled in the Arterial Revascularization Therapy Study (ARTS) trial and to determine the costs of these 2 treatment strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients (n=1205) were randomly assigned to stent implantation (n=600; diabetic, 112) or CABG (n=605; diabetic, 96). Costs per patient were calculated as the product of each patient's use of resources and the corresponding unit costs. Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. At 1 year, diabetic patients treated with stenting had the lowest event-free survival rate (63.4%) because of a higher incidence of repeat revascularization compared with both diabetic patients treated with CABG (84.4%, P<0.001) and nondiabetic patients treated with stents (76.2%, P=0.04). Conversely, diabetic and nondiabetic patients experienced similar 1-year event-free survival rates when treated with CABG (84.4% and 88.4%). The total 1-year costs for stenting and CABG in diabetic patients were $12 855 and $16 585 (P<0.001) and in the nondiabetic groups, $10 164 for stenting and $13 082 for surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Multivessel diabetic patients treated with stenting had a worse 1-year outcome than patients assigned to CABG or nondiabetics treated with stenting. The strategy of stenting was less costly than CABG, however, regardless of diabetic status. [less ▲]

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See detailThe clinical and economic implications of non-adherence with osteoporosis medications in Ireland
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; McGowan, Bernie; Bennett, Kathleen et al

Conference (2011, November)

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See detailCLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF NONAGENARIANS HOSPITALIZED IN A GERIATRIC UNIT: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY
Petermans, Jean ULg; Mathieu, Sandrine; ALLEPAERTS, Sophie ULg et al

in Journal of Aging Research and Clinical Practice (2013), 2(3), 303-309

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See detailClinical and functional investigation in an experimental model of chronic bronchitis in dogs
Bolognin, M.; Bourguignon, V.; Hofman, A. C. et al

in 18th ECVIM Meeting - Gent - Belgique - 2-5 septembre 2008 (2008, September 02)

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See detailClinical and functional responses to inhaled albuterol, ipratropium bromide and combination of both in ascaris suum-sensitized cats with allergen-induced bronchospasm
Leemans, Jérôme ULg; Kirschvink, N.; Cambier, Carole ULg et al

in Proceedings: 26th Annual Symposium of the Veterinary and Comparative Respiratory Society (2008)

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See detailClinical and functional responses to inhaled salmeterol in experimentally asthmatic cats with allergen-induced bronchospasm
Bernaerts, Frederique ULg; Leemans, Jérôme ULg; Kirschvink, N. et al

in Proceedings : 18th Congress European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine – companion animals (2008)

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