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See detailThe cell separation step of bacterial cell division
Kerff, Frédéric ULiege

Scientific conference (2013, November 26)

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See detailCell specific expression of Hsp70 in neurons and glia of the rat hippocampus after hyperthermia and kainic acid-induced seizure activity.
Krueger, A. M.; Armstrong, J. N.; Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULiege et al

in Molecular Brain Research (1999), 71(2), 265-78

In this study we investigated the time course, cell-type and stress-specific expression of hsp70 mRNA and Hsp70 protein in glial cells and neurons in the rat brain following heat shock treatment and ... [more ▼]

In this study we investigated the time course, cell-type and stress-specific expression of hsp70 mRNA and Hsp70 protein in glial cells and neurons in the rat brain following heat shock treatment and kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. Transcripts for hsp70 were detected in hippocampal homogenates from 1.5 to 6 h following hyperthermia and from 3 to 24 h following kainic acid-induced seizures. In situ hybridization revealed hsp70 mRNA to be region specific and time-dependent following hyperthermia and kainic acid-induced seizures. Western analysis indicated that Hsp70 reached maximal levels at 3 h after hyperthermia and 12 h after kainic acid-induced seizures. Immunohistochemistry revealed low level expression of Hsp70 protein in dentate granule cells at 1.5 and 3 h after hyperthermia. No Hsp70 protein was detected in neurons of the pyramidal cell layer or dentate hilus at any time following hyperthermia. Small Hsp70-immunoreactive cells were detected throughout the hippocampus following hyperthermia that, based on cell size, distribution, and double-labeling with vimentin, were considered to be glia. In contrast, high levels of Hsp70 protein were detected in neurons of the pyramidal cell layer and dentate hilus at 24 h after seizure-inducing kainic acid injection. These results suggest that expression of Hsp70 protein is cell-specific depending on the stressor. In addition, finding high levels of Hsp70 mRNA in the dentate granule cells after hyperthermia, but little or no Hsp70 protein, suggests that the synthesis of the protein is also regulated at the post-transcriptional level following hyperthermia. [less ▲]

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See detailCell surface binding of TIMP-2 and pro-MMP-2/TIMP-2 complex
Emmert-Buck, M. R.; Emonard, H. P.; Corcoran, M. L. et al

in FEBS Letters (1995), 364(1), 28-32

Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-2) is a low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor capable of inhibiting activated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). TIMP-2 is found both free and in a 1:1 ... [more ▼]

Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-2) is a low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor capable of inhibiting activated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). TIMP-2 is found both free and in a 1:1 stoichiometric complex with the pro-enzyme form of MMP-2 (pro-MMP-2/TIMP-2 complex). We have measured the binding of recombinant TIMP-2 to intact HT-1080 and MCF-7 cells. HT-1080 cells in suspension bound 125I-labeled rTIMP-2 with a Kd of 2.5 nM and 30,000 sites/cell. Monolayers of MCF-7 cells were similarly found to bind [125I]rTIMP-2 with a Kd of 1.6 nM and 25,000 sites/cell. Specific binding of MMP-2 alone to HT-1080 cells was not observed; however, pro-MMP-2/TIMP-2 complex was capable of binding to the surface of HT-1080 cells in a TIMP-2-dependent manner. Binding of rTIMP-2 was not competed by the presence of TIMP-1. These results suggest that rTIMP-2 alone binds directly to the cell surface of HT-1080 and MCF-7 cell lines, and TIMP-2 is capable of localizing MMP-2 to the surface of HT-1080 cells via interaction with a specific binding site. [less ▲]

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See detailCell surface immunophenotype and gelatinase activity of the human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7/6) with functionally defective E-cadherin.
Hlavcak, P.; Sedlakova, O.; Sedlak, J. et al

in Neoplasma (1999), 46(1), 12-6

Expression of differentiation and adhesion cell surface antigens (LewisX - CD15, CD44, syndecan 1 - CD138 and basigin/EMMPRIN - CD147) were determined on the cell surface of human breast carcinoma MCF7 ... [more ▼]

Expression of differentiation and adhesion cell surface antigens (LewisX - CD15, CD44, syndecan 1 - CD138 and basigin/EMMPRIN - CD147) were determined on the cell surface of human breast carcinoma MCF7 cells in vitro with the aid of flow cytometry and compared with that of MCF-7/6 cells, with functionally defective E-cadherin system and increased biological aggressiveness. The major cell surface alterations in MCF-7/6 cells compared with the parental MCF-7 cell line were a markedly increased CD15 (LewisX) and CD44 antigen cell surface expression on MCF-7/6 cells. There were no major differences between parental MCF-7 and MCF-7/6 cells in cell surface syndecan 1, basigin/EMMPRIN, E-cadherin and high affinity non-integrin laminin receptor expression. The constitutive cell surface gelatinase A and B activities were absent on MCF-7 and faint in MCF-7/6 cells. Both phorbol ester TPA and tumor necrosis factor TNF-alpha induced a marked up-regulation of gelatinase B only in MCF-7/6 cells. No marked differences in penetration of MCF-7 vs. MCF-7/6 cells into collagen/fibroblast matrix in vitro were observed. The increased expression of CD15 (LewisX), CD44 antigen and TNF-alpha-inducible gelatinase B on MCF-7/6 cells may represent auxiliary factors contributing to the increased biological aggressiveness of MCF-7/6 cells. [less ▲]

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See detailCell Surface Receptors in Lymphoid Cells: From Cytochemistry to Molecular Biology and from a Phenotype to a Function
Boniver, Jacques ULiege; Courtoy, R.; Schaaf-Lafontaine, Nicole ULiege et al

in Progress in Histochemistry and Cytochemistry (1992), 26(1-4), 169-81

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See detailCell survival and preservation of siRNA-mediated protein knock-down upon serum-free cryopreservation (-80 degrees C).
Lambert, Charles ULiege; Deroanne, Christophe ULiege; Servotte, Sandrine et al

in Gravitational and Space Biology Bulletin (2005), 18(2), 103-4

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See detailCell turnover in BLV-infected sheep
Debacq, Christophe; Peremans, T.; Kerkhofs, Pierre et al

in Aids Research and Human Retroviruses": 10th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Viruses, (2001, June)

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See detailCell turnover in BLV-infected sheep.
Debacq, C.; Peremans, T.; Kerkhofs, P. et al

in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses (2001), 17(1), 13

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See detailA Cell Type-Specific and Gap Junction-Independent Mechanism for the Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Thymidine Kinase Gene/Ganciclovir-Mediated Bystander Effect
Princen, Frederic; Robe, Pierre ULiege; Lechanteur, Chantal ULiege et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (1999), 5(11), 3639-44

Tumor cells expressing the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene are killed by nucleoside analogues such as ganciclovir (GCV). GCV affects not only the cells expressing HSV-tk but ... [more ▼]

Tumor cells expressing the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene are killed by nucleoside analogues such as ganciclovir (GCV). GCV affects not only the cells expressing HSV-tk but also neighboring cells that do not express the gene; this phenomenon commonly is called "bystander effect." GCV metabolites transfer via gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) accounts for the bystander effect in different cell lines, but other mechanisms have also been described. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms of the bystander effect in two cell lines exhibiting different capacities of communication (DHD/K12 and 9L). The 9L cells exhibited a very good bystander effect, which was completely blocked by a long-term inhibitor of GJIC, 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid. DHD/K12 cells exhibited a moderate bystander effect that was not abolished by 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid or 1-octanol, another strong inhibitor of GJIC. Interestingly, we also observed a bystander effect in cultures where HSV-tk-expressing DHD/K12 cells were physically separated from their untransfected counterparts but grown in the same medium. Moreover, the transfer of filtered conditioned medium from GCV-treated HSV-tk-expressing DHD/K12 cells to DHD/K12 parental cells induced a decrease of survival in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that the bystander effect in this cell line was mediated by a soluble factor. [less ▲]

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See detailCell Type-Specific Role for Reactive Oxygen Species in Nuclear Factor-Kappab Activation by Interleukin-1
Bonizzi, G.; Piette, Jacques ULiege; Merville, Marie-Paule ULiege et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2000), 59(1), 7-11

The role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) in nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation remains a matter of controversy. We have studied whether ROIs played any role in NF-kappaB induction by ... [more ▼]

The role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) in nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation remains a matter of controversy. We have studied whether ROIs played any role in NF-kappaB induction by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in different cell types. Our studies indicated three different pathways. IL-1beta stimulation of lymphoid cells generates ROIs, which are required for IkappaB-alpha degradation and NF-kappaB activation. The source of these ROIs is the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzyme. In monocytic cells, ROIs are also produced in response to IL-1beta and necessary for NF-kappaB induction, but their source appears to be the NADPH oxidase complex. Finally, epithelial cells do not generate ROIs after IL-1beta stimulation, but do rapidly activate NF-kappaB. Interestingly, transfection of epithelial cells with the 5-LOX and 5-LOX activating protein expression vectors restored ROI production and ROI-dependent NF-kappaB activation in response to IL-1beta. Our data thus indicate that ROIs are cell type-specific second messengers for NF-kappaB induction by IL-1beta. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Cell Wall Peptidoglycan of Bacillus megaterium KM. I. Studies on the Stereochemistry of α,α'-Diaminopimelic Acid
Bricas, E.; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULiege; Dezelee, P.

in Biochemistry (1967), 6(8), 2598-2607

α,α'-Diaminopimelic acid (DAP) occurs in the wall peptidoglycan of Bacillus megaterium KM predominantly in the form of its meso isomer (about 85% of the total residues) and, in minor amounts, in the form ... [more ▼]

α,α'-Diaminopimelic acid (DAP) occurs in the wall peptidoglycan of Bacillus megaterium KM predominantly in the form of its meso isomer (about 85% of the total residues) and, in minor amounts, in the form of its DD isomer. The amino groups on the L carbon of the meso-DAP residues are involved in peptide linkages to the glutamic acid residues. Most of the amino groups on the D carbon of the meso-DAP residues are free; some of them are substituted, thus probably serving to cross-link peptide subunits. These amino groups can be liberated by a Streptomyces endopeptidase. None of the DD-DAP residues have amino groups free. Moreover, these groups are not liberated by endopeptidase treatment. The peptidoglycan upon enzymatic degradation yields mainly two fractions. A major fraction is composed of disaccharide peptide monomer subunits containing only the meso isomer of DAP. A second minor fraction is composed of disaccharide peptide oligomers containing both meso and DD isomers of DAP. The meso-DAP residues isolated as monodinitrophenyl derivatives from both fractions have optical rotations and optical rotatory dispersions identical with that of synthetic monodinitrophenyl-meso-DAP obtained by dinitrophenylation of the amino group on the D carbon. The assignment of the DD configuration to the DAP residues which are not meso rests upon the optical rotatory properties of their bisdinitrophenyl derivatives. [less ▲]

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See detailCell wall phenylpropanoid-related gene expression in early maize recombinant inbred lines differing in parental alleles at a major lignin QTL position
Thomas, Justine; Guillaumie, Sabine; Verdu, Cindy ULiege et al

in Molecular Breeding (2010), 25

Fifteen quantitative trait loci (QTL) for cell wall digestibility and lignin content were shown in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) progeny descended from the cross between F288 and F271, two early dent ... [more ▼]

Fifteen quantitative trait loci (QTL) for cell wall digestibility and lignin content were shown in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) progeny descended from the cross between F288 and F271, two early dent lines of contrasted cell wall digestibility. Among these QTL, those located in bin 6.06, respectively explained 20 and 40% of the phenotypic variation for lignin content and cell wall digestibility. Expression of genes related to cell wall and lignin biosynthesis was investigated with the ‘‘MaizeWall’’ macro-array in two RIL having favorable alleles for low lignin content and high cell wall digestibility, except in bin 6.06 where RIL39 and RIL99 had unfavorable and favorable alleles, respectively. In the lignin pathway, three PAL, 4CL1, ZmCCR1, COMT, and ZmCAD2 genes were under-expressed in RIL99 in comparison to RIL39. In addition, two cytochrome P450, ZmCHS, and ZmCHI1 genes were simultaneously under-expressed while F5H2 and two OMT ZRP4-like genes were over-expressed. However, none of these genes were mapped in bin 6.06. Based on maize–rice synteny and on Maize Genome Sequencing Project data, several putative candidate genes related to lignin content and lignified tissue patterning were found in the support interval of bin 6.06 QTL. These genes included one C30H which is likely the missing constitutive gene of the maize lignin pathway. Three ZRP4-like OMT were also shown in the support interval of the QTL. However, their involvement in the lignin pathway has not yet been firmly established. Several regulation or transcription factors were also shown in the QTL support interval. Among them, MYB, zinc finger, bZIP, and COV1 genes belong to families with members involved in lignification regulation or in lignified tissue patterning. In addition, auxin response factors have been shown to be indirectly involved in plant lignification. Moreover, several genes encoding proteins of unknown function and genes annotated ‘‘retrotransposon-like’’ were also located in the QTL support interval. Current results are not conclusive on the candidate gene discovery, but strengthen the hypothesis that regulation genes are better candidates than genes involved in the monolignol pathway. Fine mapping, association genetics, and/or functional validation have to be considered for more definite conclusions. [less ▲]

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See detailCell wall polysaccharides hydrolysis of malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) : a review
Jamar, Catherine ULiege; du Jardin, Patrick ULiege; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULiege

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(2), 301-313

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See detailCell walls of Streptococcus pyogenes, type 14. C polysaccharide-peptidoglycan and G polysaccharide-peptidoglycan complexes
Munoz, E.; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULiege; Heymann, H.

in Biochemistry (1967), 6(12), 3659-2670

About 20% of the organic phosphorus present in cell walls of Streptococcus pyogenes occurs as N-acetylmuramic acid 6-phosphate residues (50 mµequiv/mg of walls). These groups link about 10% of the ... [more ▼]

About 20% of the organic phosphorus present in cell walls of Streptococcus pyogenes occurs as N-acetylmuramic acid 6-phosphate residues (50 mµequiv/mg of walls). These groups link about 10% of the peptidoglycan subunits to a hitherto unrecognized polysaccharide. This polymer was isolated after degradation of trypsin-treated walls with Streptornyces F1 endo-N-acetylmuramidase; it consists of disaccharide peptide monomer (50 mµmoles/mg of walls) linked through a phosphodiester bridge to a polymer containing, per peptide monomer, five to six D-glucose residues, one glucosamine residue, and four to five unidentified hexosamine compounds. This polymer is designated as G polysaccharide. About 70% of the organically bound phosphorus in the cell walls (150 mµequiv/mg of walls) is present in the form of phosphodiester groups in the interior of the rhamnose-containing C polysaccharide. The linkages of the C-polysaccharide chains to the peptidoglycan are visualized as bridges of trirhamnose groupings, each bearing one β-linked N-acetylgluco-samine residue, bound at the reducing end, either directly or through an as yet undetermined intervening molecule, to C-4 of an N-acetylmuramic acid residue. After degradation of walls by endo-N-acetylmurami-dase, the C-polysaccharide chains remain bound to one N-acetylmuramic acid residue. This N-acetylmur-amic acid residue is substituted by one tetrapeptide monomer which in turn is linked via a di-L-alanyl bridge to another disaccharide peptide monomer. A structure for the cell walls of Streptococcus pyogenes is proposed that takes into account all of the recognized covalent linkages among the constituent polymers. [less ▲]

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See detailCell-based description of ventricular contraction in a model of the human cardiovascular system
Kosta, Sarah ULiege; Negroni, Jorge; Lascano, Elena et al

in IFAC-PapersOnLine (2015, September)

A multiscale model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) is presented. Hemodynamics is described by a lumped parameter model, while heart contraction is described at the cellular scale. An ... [more ▼]

A multiscale model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) is presented. Hemodynamics is described by a lumped parameter model, while heart contraction is described at the cellular scale. An electrophysiological model and a mechanical model were coupled and adjusted so that the pressure and volume of both ventricles are linked to the force and length of a half-sarcomere. Particular attention was paid to the extremal values of the sarcomere length, which must keep physiological values. This model is able to reproduce healthy behavior, preload variations experiments, and ventricular failure. [less ▲]

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