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See detailA comparison of physical activation of carbon xerogels with carbon dioxide with chemical activation using hydroxides
Contreras, María S; Páez, Carlos A; Zubizarreta, Leire et al

in Carbon (2010), 48(11), 3157-3168

Carbon xerogels synthesized with a fixed resorcinol/sodium carbonate molar ratio (R/C) were physically activated using CO2. The effect of activation temperature and activation time on the final properties ... [more ▼]

Carbon xerogels synthesized with a fixed resorcinol/sodium carbonate molar ratio (R/C) were physically activated using CO2. The effect of activation temperature and activation time on the final properties of the activated carbon xerogels was evaluated. The specific surface area increases from ~600 m2 g-1 to 2000 m2 g-1 and more by increasing the temperature and duration of the activation step. A comparison between physical activation with CO2 and chemical activation with hydroxides was also performed: it was found that both processes produce an increase of the micropore volume and specific surface area without altering the meso-macroporosity developed during the synthesis. However, chemical activation can lead to the development of the narrow microporosity mainly whereas, in physical activation, the widening of the narrow micropores takes place whatever the process conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of physical education teaching events' perception by beginning and experienced teachers
Cloes, Marc ULg; Vandersmissen, Axel; Piéron, Maurice

in Carreiro da Costa, F.; Diniz, J.; Carvalho, L. (Eds.) et al Proceedings of the AIESEP International Seminar "Research on Teaching. Research on Teacher Education" (2000)

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See detailCOMPARISON OF PIEZOELECTRIC AND CRUSHER MEASUREMENTS OF CHAMBER PRESSURE WITH FINITE ELEMENT MODELING RESULTS
Coghe, Frédéric; Elkarous, Lamine ULg

in International Symposium on Ballistics (2013, April 23)

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See detailA comparison of piston, screw and scroll expanders for small scale Rankine cycle systems
Lemort, Vincent ULg; Guillaume, Ludovic ULg; Legros, Arnaud ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Microgeneration and Related Technologies (2013, April)

This paper aims at helping the designer of micro-scale Rankine Cycle heat engines to best select the expander among piston, screw and scroll machines. The first part of the paper presents a state of the ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at helping the designer of micro-scale Rankine Cycle heat engines to best select the expander among piston, screw and scroll machines. The first part of the paper presents a state of the art of these three technologies of positive displacement machines. The technical constraints inherent to each machine (rotational speed, pressure ratios, maximum temperatures, volumetric expansion ratios, etc.) are listed and the performance mentioned in the open technical and scientific literature is presented. The second part of the paper deals with the modeling of such expanders. Different simulation models are proposed: black-box, grey-box and white-box models. These three categories of modeling are specifically adapted to different purposes: design of the expander, design of the micro-CHP system, and dynamic simulation/control of the CHP unit. The last part of the paper presents a graphical methodology of selection of expansion machines and working fluids based on operating maps. It is stressed that the selections of both the expansion machine and working fluid should be conducted simultaneously. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of plant defense elicitor properties of amphiphilic compounds from plant-associated bacteria
Mariutto, M.; Fernandez, O.; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Bulletin OILB/SROP = IOBC/WPRS Bulletin (2013), 89

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See detailComparison of plasma cardiac troponins T and I in chronically hemodialyzed patients in relation to cardiac status and age
Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg; Dubois, Bernard ULg; Bovy, Christophe ULg et al

in Clinical Chemistry & Laboratory Medicine (2002), 40(3), 240-245

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See detailComparison of plyometric training combined with electrical stimulation versus plyometric training alone on vertical jump and sprint performance
Lehance, Cédric ULg; Vanderthommen, Marc ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Abstract Book of the 4th International Conference on Strength Training (Serres, Greece) (2004, November)

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See detailA Comparison of Po2, Pco2, Ph and Bicarbonate in Blood from the Carotid and Coccygeal Arteries of Calves
Gustin, Pascal ULg; de Groote, A.; Dhem, A. R. et al

in Veterinary Research Communications (1988), 12(4-5), 343-346

A technique is described for the subcutaneous deviation of the carotid artery into the jugular groove of calves weighing between 90 and 200 kg. This makes sampling arterial blood or chronic cannulation ... [more ▼]

A technique is described for the subcutaneous deviation of the carotid artery into the jugular groove of calves weighing between 90 and 200 kg. This makes sampling arterial blood or chronic cannulation for further experimentation very easy. Values of oxygen tension, carbon dioxide tension, pH and bicarbonate concentration in blood sampled from the ventral coccygeal artery were compared with the values obtained in blood from carotid artery puncture. The high correlations observed indicate that blood samples from the ventral coccygeal artery can be used for measurement of blood gases and pH in calves. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of positron emission tomography and computed tomography in the mediastinal and extrathoracic staging of non-small cell lung cancer
PAULUS, Patrick; BURY, Thierry ULg; HUSTINX, Roland ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (1996), 37

Comparison of positron emission tomography and computed tomography in the mediastinal and extrathoracic staging of non-small cell lung cancer

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See detailComparison of Proteins of Simian Herpesvirus Aotus Type 2 and Bovine Herpesvirus Type 4
Dubuisson, J.; Danyi, Sophie ULg; Bublot, M. et al

in Journal of General Virology (1991), 72((Pt 5)), 1145-50

Genomes of herpesvirus aotus type 2 (HVA-2) and bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) have previously been shown to be closely similar. Moreover, preliminary serological data indicated that HVA-2 is ... [more ▼]

Genomes of herpesvirus aotus type 2 (HVA-2) and bovine herpesvirus type 4 (BHV-4) have previously been shown to be closely similar. Moreover, preliminary serological data indicated that HVA-2 is antigenically related to BHV-4. To extend this study, structural components of four BHV-4 strains and HVA-2 were compared by SDS-PAGE, radioimmunoprecipitation and Western blotting. The overall pattern of structural proteins was the same for HVA-2 and BHV-4 but variations were observed in electrophoretic profiles of glycoproteins, mainly of the two major ones (gp6/gp10/gp17 and gp11/VP24). Variations between HVA-2 and BHV-4 glycoproteins were greater than those observed among BHV-4 strains. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of quantitative ultrasound at the heel with a clinical risk factor score for the assessment of postmenopausal osteoporosis
Goemaere, S.; Zmierczak, H.; Lauwerier, D. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002), 13(S1), 73-74

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See detailComparison of quantitative ultrasound at the heel with a clinical risk factor score for the assessment of postmenopausal osteoporosis
Goemare, S.; Zmierczak, H.; Lauwerier, D. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002, November), 13(Suppl.3), 36

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See detailComparison of radiography , magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings in dogs with elbow dysplasia
Snaps, Frédéric ULg; Balligand, Marc ULg; Saunders, J. et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (1997), 58(12), 1367-1370

Objective-To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of medial coronoid process and humeral condyle lesions in dysplastic cubital joints and to compare survey radiography and MRI for ... [more ▼]

Objective-To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of medial coronoid process and humeral condyle lesions in dysplastic cubital joints and to compare survey radiography and MRI for evaluation of fragmented medial coronoid process (FMCP) and lesions of the medial aspect of the humeral condyle (MAHC). Animals-18 dogs with elbow dysplasia. Procedure-Radiography of 22 cubital joints was performed. The 22 joints then underwent MRI. The scans were evaluated with regard to the shape and signal of the coronoid process; articular cartilage change, subchondral bone disruption of the MAHC. Surgical findings were used as the standard to calculate accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive-and negative-predictive values for specific diagnosis of FMCP (free fragment) and lesions of the MAHC. Results-At surgery, 31.8% of the joints had FMCP (free), 36.4% had nondisplaced unmineralized coronoid process, and 27.2% had nondisplaced mineralized coronoid process, Eleven joints had lesions of the MAHC, and wear lesions were observed in 41% of the joints. On radiography, FMCP (free) was visualized in 9% of the joints and lesions of the MAHC were observed in 23%. MRI had the highest accuracy (95.5%), sensitivity (100%), and negative-predictive value (100%) for detection of FMCP (free), and had accuracy (91%), sensitivity (87.5%), specificity (92.5%), and positive (87.5%)- and negative (92.5%)- predictive values for detection of nondisplaced unmineralized coronoid process. Conclusions and Clinical relevance-Compared with radiography, MRI was useful for detection of nondisplaced unmineralized coronoid process; images consistently correlated with surgical findings. The technique is accurate and especially useful when radiographic findings are inconclusive. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of raloxifene and alendronate on markers of cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Adachi, J. R.; Qu, Y. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2003, November), 14(Suppl. 7), 42

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See detailComparison of Rational-Based and Rule-Based Optimum Design of Ship Structures
Karr, Dale; Rigo, Philippe ULg; Na, SS et al

in SNAME Transactions (2002)

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See detailComparison of Rational-Based and Rule-Based Optimum Design of Ship Structures
Karr, D.; Rigo, Philippe ULg; N a S S et al

in Annual Meeting of SNAME, Paper 19 (2002, September)

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See detailComparison of Real-Time Aspergillus PCR with Platelia™AspergillusEIA in broncho-alveolar lavage fluids for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients
RUZICKA, NADIA; BOREUX, Raphaël ULg; LEVAUX, Laetitia ULg et al

Poster (2013, April 27)

Objectives. Because of low sensitivity of fungal cultures and lack of standardization of Aspergillus PCR, laboratory diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis still relies on galactomannan (GM) detection in ... [more ▼]

Objectives. Because of low sensitivity of fungal cultures and lack of standardization of Aspergillus PCR, laboratory diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis still relies on galactomannan (GM) detection in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluids and serum. The aim of this study was double: first, to assess the place of a 18S rRNA Aspergillus real-time PCR test performed in BAL fluid for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in neutro- and non-neutropenic patients in comparison with GM detection; secondly, to evaluate the use of three different GM cut-off values. Materials and methods. A total of 111 neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients hospitalized at the University hospital of Liège from March to October 2012 with suspicion of IA were included in the study. A total of 138 broncho-alveolar lavage fluids were evaluated by three laboratory diagnostic methods: 1/ culture on Sabouraud agar slants with antibiotics (bioMérieux, France) incubated at 28°C for 28 days; 2/ GM detection (Platelia ™Aspergillus EIA, Biorad) using GM index cut-off values at 0.5, 0.8 and 1, performed three times a week; 3/ a real-time Aspergillus PCR assay performed daily and targeting the 18S rRNA genes by using an in-house method. Clinical, radiological and microbiological data were reviewed for classification of patients. Results. Nine patients developed probable or possible IA. The sensitivity/specificity/positive (VPP) and negative (NPV) predictive values (%) for culture, PCR, and GM using 0,5 as cut-off value were respectively 41/100/100/94, 58/97/70/96, and 91/83/34/99. The use of 0,8 and 1 as GM index cut-off values increased the specificity to 89 and 92% respectively, and the VPP to 44 and 54%. PCR had a better turn-around time and allowed the detection of Aspergillus colonisation. Conclusion: GM detection in BAL fluids using a cut-off value of 1 was the most efficient laboratory test for the diagnosis of IA in neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients. Despite a lower sensitivity, PCR had a better VPP, and allowed the detection of culture-negative Aspergillus colonisations. A shorter turnaround time (TAT) due to daily practice of PCR tests may reduce the time-to-treatment up to 24 hours. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of rectal and infrared ear temperatures in older hospital inpatients.
Smitz, Simon ULg; Giagoultsis, T; Dewé, Walthère ULg et al

in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2000), 48(1), 63-6

OBJECTIVES: To assess the agreement between infrared emission detection (IRED) ear and rectal temperatures and to determine the validity of IRED ear thermometry in detecting rectal fever. DESIGN ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To assess the agreement between infrared emission detection (IRED) ear and rectal temperatures and to determine the validity of IRED ear thermometry in detecting rectal fever. DESIGN: Prospective, convenience sample, unblinded study. SETTING: An acute geriatric unit (teaching hospital) and a multidisciplinary intensive care unit. PARTICIPANTS: The study included 45 inpatients (26 women and 19 men), aged 78.3+/-6.9 years, admitted over a 4-month period. Twelve of the patients were definitely infected. MEASUREMENTS: Sequential rectal (RT) and ear temperature (ET) measurements were performed using mercury-in-glass and IRED ear thermometers, respectively. IRED ear temperatures were measured at both ears (unadjusted mode), with the highest of six ear temperatures considered the true value. RESULTS: Mean RT (37.39 degrees C +/- 0.52 degrees C) was significantly (P<.001) higher than mean ET (36.89 degrees C +/-0.59 degrees C). A highly significant positive correlation was found between RT and ET (slope = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.86; P<.001; r = 0.78). The mean bias (mean of the differences) between RT and ET was 0.50 degrees C +/-0.37 degrees C (95% CI, 0.41 degrees C-0.59 degrees C), and the 95% limits of agreement -0.22 degrees C and 1.23 degrees C (95% CI, -0.38 degrees C to 1.39 degrees C). According to the standard criterion (RT > or =37.6 degrees C), 14 patients were febrile. Using an optimum IRED ear fever threshold (37.2 degrees C), the sensitivity and specificity of IRED ear thermometry for predicting rectal fever were 86% and 89%, respectively (positive predictive value, 80%; negative predictive value, 93%). CONCLUSIONS: The degree of agreement between rectal temperature and the highest of six IRED ear temperatures was acceptable. Using an optimal IRED ear fever threshold of 37.2 degrees C (99 degrees F), IRED ear thermometry had acceptable sensitivity and specificity for predicting rectal fever. [less ▲]

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