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See detailCentral exclusive production of dijets at hadronic colliders
Cudell, Jean-René ULg; Dechambre, Alice ULg; Hernandez, O. F. et al

in European Physical Journal C -- Particles & Fields (2009), 61(3), 369

In view of the recent diffractive dijet data from CDF run II, we critically re-evaluate the standard approach to the calculation of central production of dijets in quasi-elastic hadronic collisions. We ... [more ▼]

In view of the recent diffractive dijet data from CDF run II, we critically re-evaluate the standard approach to the calculation of central production of dijets in quasi-elastic hadronic collisions. We find that the process is dominated by the non-perturbative region, and that even perturbative ingredients, such as the Sudakov form factor, are not under theoretical control. Comparison with data allows us to fix some of the uncertainties. Although we focus on dijets, our arguments apply to other high-mass central systems, such as the Higgs boson. [less ▲]

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See detailCentral exclusive production: Vector mesons, dijets, Higgs boson
Cudell, Jean-René ULg

(2010)

I review the situation of theoretical predictions of central exclusive production, and show that the CDF dijet data can be used to constrain the prediction of central exclusive Higgs boson production. I ... [more ▼]

I review the situation of theoretical predictions of central exclusive production, and show that the CDF dijet data can be used to constrain the prediction of central exclusive Higgs boson production. I also show that central exclusive production might be used as a discovery tool for the odderon. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (6 ULg)
See detailCentral mechanisms in tension-type headache: assessment by neurophysiological methods. In particular, exteroceptive suppression of temporalis muscle activity
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Olesen, J.; Schoenen, Jean (Eds.) Tension-Type Headache: classification, mechanisms and treatment (Frontiers in Headache Research) (1993)

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See detailCentral nervous system involvement by multiple myeloma: A multi-institutional retrospective study of 172 patients in daily clinical practice.
Jurczyszyn, Artur; Grzasko, Norbert; Gozzetti, Alessandro et al

in American journal of hematology (2016), 91(6), 575-80

The multicenter retrospective study conducted in 38 centers from 20 countries including 172 adult patients with CNS MM aimed to describe the clinical and pathological characteristics and outcomes of ... [more ▼]

The multicenter retrospective study conducted in 38 centers from 20 countries including 172 adult patients with CNS MM aimed to describe the clinical and pathological characteristics and outcomes of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) involving the central nervous system (CNS). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify prognostic factors for survival. The median time from MM diagnosis to CNS MM diagnosis was 3 years. Thirty-eight patients (22%) were diagnosed with CNS involvement at the time of initial MM diagnosis and 134 (78%) at relapse/progression. Upon diagnosis of CNS MM, 97% patients received initial therapy for CNS disease, of which 76% received systemic therapy, 36% radiotherapy and 32% intrathecal therapy. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, the median overall survival (OS) from the onset of CNS involvement for the entire group was 7 months. Untreated and treated patients had median OS of 2 and 8 months, respectively (P < 0.001). At least one previous line of therapy for MM before the diagnosis of CNS disease and >1 cytogenetic abnormality detected by FISH were independently associated with worse OS. The median OS for patients with 0, 1 and 2 of these risk factors were 25 months, 5.5 months and 2 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Neurological manifestations, not considered chemotherapy-related, observed at any time after initial diagnosis of MM should raise a suspicion of CNS involvement. Although prognosis is generally poor, the survival of previously untreated patients and patients with favorable cytogenetic profile might be prolonged due to systemic treatment and/or radiotherapy. Am. J. Hematol. 91:575-580, 2016. (c) 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailCentral nervous system: a conductor orchestrating metabolic regulations harmed by both hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia.
Scheen, André ULg

in Diabètes & Métabolism (2010), 36S3

Recent evidence suggests that the brain has a key role in the control of energy metabolism, body fat content and glucose metabolism. Neuronal systems, which regulate energy intake, energy expenditure, and ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence suggests that the brain has a key role in the control of energy metabolism, body fat content and glucose metabolism. Neuronal systems, which regulate energy intake, energy expenditure, and endogenous glucose production, sense and respond to input from hormonal and nutrient-related signals that convey information regarding both body energy stores and current energy availability. In response to this input, adaptive changes occur that promote energy homeostasis and the maintenance of blood glucose levels in the normal range. Defects in this control system are implicated in the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The central nervous system may be considered the conductor of an orchestra involving many peripheral organs involved in these homeostatic processes. However, the brain is mainly a glucose-dependent organ, which can be damaged by both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia. Hypoglycaemia unawareness is a major problem in clinical practice and is associated with an increased risk of coma. Stroke is another acute complication associated with diabetes mellitus, especially in elderly people, and the control of glucose level in this emergency situation remains challenging. The prognosis of stroke is worse in diabetic patients and both its prevention and management in at-risk patients should be improved. Finally, chronic diabetic encephalopathies, which may lead to cognitive dysfunction and even dementia, are also recognized. They may result from recurrent hypoglycaemia and/or from chronic hyperglycaemia leading to cerebral vascular damage. Functional imaging is of interest for exploring diabetes-associated cerebral abnormalities. Thus, the intimate relationship between the brain and diabetes is increasingly acknowledged in both research and clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailCentral neuroblastoma in a 14 year-old girl
Hoyoux, Cl; Dresse, Marie-Françoise ULg; Misson, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in 4th International Symposium on Neuroblastoma Screening (1995)

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See detailCentral neuromodulation in cluster headache patients treated with occipital nerve stimulators: A PET study
Magis, Delphine ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Fumal, Arnaud ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2010), 110(Suppl 1), 17

OBJECTIVES: Use functional brain imaging to explore activity changes in centres involved in trigeminal pain processing and control before and after occipital neurostimulation in drug-resistant chronic ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Use functional brain imaging to explore activity changes in centres involved in trigeminal pain processing and control before and after occipital neurostimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache patients. BACKGROUND: Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) provides relief to about 60% of patients suffering from drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH). Its mode of action, however, remains elusive, but the long latency to meaningful effect suggests that ONS induces slow neuromodulation. METHODS: Ten drCCH patients underwent an 18FDG-PET scan after ONS durations varying between 0 and 30 months. All were scanned with ongoing ONS (ON) and with the stimulator switched OFF. RESULTS: After 6-30 months of ONS, 3 patients were pain free and 4 had a ≥ 90% reduction of attack frequency (responders). In patients overall compared to controls, several areas of the pain matrix were hypermetabolic: ipsilateral hypothalamus, midbrain and ipsilateral lower pons. All normalized after ONS, except the hypothalamus. Switching ON or OFF the stimulator had little influence on brain glucose metabolism. The perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC) was hyperactive in ONS responders compared to non-responders. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic normalization in the pain neuromatrix and lack of short-term changes induced by the stimulation support the hypothesis that ONS acts in drCCH through slow neuromodulatory processes. Selective activation in responders of PACC, a pivotal structure in the endogenous opioid system, suggests that ONS may restore balance within dysfunctioning pain control centres. That ONS is nothing but a symptomatic treatment might be illustrated by the persistent hypothalamic hypermetabolism which could explain why autonomic attacks may persist despite pain relief and why cluster attacks recur shortly after stimulator arrest. [less ▲]

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See detailCentral Pelvic spaces: Limits, content & landmarks
Bonnet, Pierre ULg

Scientific conference (2014, April 14)

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See detailCentral Pelvic spaces: Limits, content & landmarks
Bonnet, Pierre ULg

Scientific conference (2015, April 20)

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See detailCentral pontine myelinolysis associated with acquired folate depletion
RAMAEKERS, Vincent ULg; Reul, J.; Kusenbach, G. et al

in Neuropediatrics (1997), 28(2), 126-30

After long-standing malnutrition a 15-month-old boy with signs of kwashiorkor was admitted in a moribund state with serious hyponatraemic dehydration, hypothermia, somnolence, and signs of a pontine ... [more ▼]

After long-standing malnutrition a 15-month-old boy with signs of kwashiorkor was admitted in a moribund state with serious hyponatraemic dehydration, hypothermia, somnolence, and signs of a pontine disconnection syndrome. Folic acid levels were below the detection level in the presence of normal cobalamin levels. MRI of the brain showed global volume loss and signal abnormalities on the T2-weighted images suggestive for central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Brainstem acoustic evoked responses have remained normal. The serious metabolic and nutritional derangements required substitution of folic acid, vitamins and trace elements as well as slow correction of hyponatraemic dehydration with return of the sodium level over a period of four days. This therapeutic regimen resulted in complete neurological recovery. Follow-up MRI documented normalisation of the initial pathologic findings. The hypothesis was put forward linking the pathogenesis of CPM with the combination of folate depletion and superimposed hyponatraemic dehydration. The previously acquired folate depletion could affect normal appositional function of myelin basic protein molecules due to insufficient methylation of arginine in position 107. The subsequent development of intramyelinic edema and CPM will then be triggered by the superimposed hyponatraemic dehydration. The verification of this hypothesis requires further investigations. [less ▲]

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See detailThe central region of quasars seen with gravitational microlensing
Sluse, Dominique ULg

Scientific conference (2012, March 29)

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See detailThe Central Role of FORS1/2 Spectropolarimetric Observations for the Progress of Stellar Magnetism Studies
Schöller, M.; Hubrig, S.; Ilyin, I. et al

in The Messenger (2016), 163

The spectropolarimetric mode of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrographs (FORS), which was first implemented in FORS1, and then moved to FORS2 seven years ago, has made it possible to probe the ... [more ▼]

The spectropolarimetric mode of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrographs (FORS), which was first implemented in FORS1, and then moved to FORS2 seven years ago, has made it possible to probe the presence of magnetic fields in stars of different spectral classes at almost all stages of stellar evolution. While in the early days of FORS1, many of the observations were related to magnetic Ap/Bp stars and their progenitor Herbig Ae/Be stars, recent spectropolarimetric studies with FORS2 have involved more challenging targets, such as massive O- and B-type stars in clusters and in the field, very fast rotating massive stars with magnetospheres, Wolf-Rayet stars and central stars of planetary nebulae. The role of FORS observations for stellar magnetic field measurements is summarised and improvements in the measurement technique are described. [less ▲]

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See detailThe central role of the thymus in the development of self-tolerance and autoimmunity in the neuroendocrine system
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Brilot, Fabienne; Hansenne, Isabelle et al

in Geenen, Vincent; Chrousos, Geroge P. (Eds.) Immunoendocrinology in Health and Disease (2004)

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See detailThe central role of the thymus in the education of T cells to neuroendocrine self principles
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Cormann-Goffin, Nadine et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1993), 101

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See detailThe central role of the thymus in the programming of immunological tolerance to neuroendocrine self: Implications for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

Geenen, Vincent ULg

Conference (2015, June)

Our studies have demonstrated that the thymus programs central self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions through transcription of neuroendocrine-related genes in thymic epithelial cells (TECs). However ... [more ▼]

Our studies have demonstrated that the thymus programs central self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions through transcription of neuroendocrine-related genes in thymic epithelial cells (TECs). However, thymic neuroendocrine precursors are not secreted but processed as the source of neuroendocrine self-antigens that are presented by thymic proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This process, highly specific of the thymus, has allowed an integrated and harmonious coevolution of the neuroendocrine and immune systems when recombination-activating genes and the subsequent adaptive immune response have emerged in cartilaginous fishes some 450-500 millions years ago. All the members of the insulin gene family are expressed in murine TECs under the control of AutoImmune Regulator (AIRE) according a precise hierarchy: Igf2 >Igf1>Ins2>Ins1. Igf2 transcription is defective in TECs of autoimmune diabetes-prone BB rats, and tolerance to insulin is severely impaired in Igf2-/- mice as well as in Igf2-loxP/Foxn1-cre mice with Igf2 deletion targeted in TECs. In addition, the diabetogenic coxsackievirus B4 (CV-B4) is able to persistently infect human and murine TECs and to inhibit Igf2 transcription and IGF-2 synthesis in a murine medullary TEC line (coolaboration with D. Hober, Laboratory of Virology, CHRU and University of Lille 2, France). These studies show that: 1° IGF-2 is the dominant tolerogenic precursor of the family and mediates cross-tolerance to insulin; 2° a thymus dysfunction plays a crucial role in the development of the diabetogenic autoimmune response; and 3° a thymic infection by CV-B4 is implicated in type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Most probably due to its very low level of expression in the thymus, the protein insulin is highly immunogenic and is the primary autoantigen tackled in T1D. On the basis of the tolerogenic properties of IGF-2, we are currently working on the development of a negative/tolerogenic self-vaccine against T1D. [less ▲]

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See detailCentral self-tolerance by thymic presentation of self-antigens and autoimmunity
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Hansenne, Isabelle et al

in Current Medicinal Chemistry - Immunology, Endocrine & Metabolic Agents (2001), 1

Before reacting against non-self infectious agents, the immune system is educated to tolerate the host molecular structure (self). The induction of self-tolerance is a multistep process that begins in the ... [more ▼]

Before reacting against non-self infectious agents, the immune system is educated to tolerate the host molecular structure (self). The induction of self-tolerance is a multistep process that begins in the thymus during fetal ontogeny (central tolerance) and also involves inactivating mechanisms outside the thymus (peripheral tolerance). The thymus is the primary lymphoid organ implicated in the development of competent and self-tolerant T cells. During ontogeny, T cell progenitors originating from hemopoietic tissues (yolk sac, fetal liver, and then bone marrow) enter the thymus and undergo a program of proliferation, T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement, maturation and selection. Close interactions between thymocytes (pre-T cells) and the thymic cellular environment are crucial both for T cell development and induction of central self-tolerance. Thymic epithelial and stromal cells synthesize polypeptides belonging to various neuroendocrine families. The thymic repertoire of neuroendocrine-related precursors transposes at the molecular level the dual role of the thymus in T cell negative and positive selection. Thymic precursors not only constitute a source of growth peptides for cryptocrine signaling between thymic stromal cells and pre-T cells, but are also processed in a way that leads to the presentation of self-antigens by thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Thymic neuroendocrine self-antigens often correspond to peptide sequences highly conserved during the evolution of their corresponding family. The thymic presentation of some neuroendocrine self-antigens is not restricted by MHC alleles. Following the presentation of neuroendocrine self-antigens by thymic MHC proteins, the T cell system might be educated to tolerate main hormone families. Recent experiments argue that a defect in the thymic essential tolerogenic function is implicated as an important factor in the pathophysiology of many autoimmune diseases. [less ▲]

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