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Peer Reviewed
See detailChromosome 22 Mosaic Monosomy (46,Xy/45,Xy,-22)
Verloes, Alain ULg; Herens, Christian ULg; Lambotte, C. et al

in Annales de Génétique (1987), 30(3), 178-9

A slightly dysmorphic and mentally defective child with mosaic monosomy 22 is reported. Chromosome 22 is absent in 10.5% of lymphocytes and 8.3% of fibroblasts. This is the second case report of that kind.

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Peer Reviewed
See detailChromosome aberrations and equine fertility.
Durkin, Keith ULg; Raudsepp, T; Chowdhary, B.P.

in Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Texas Genetics Society (2005, April)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailChromosome Integration Domain for Bovine Leukemia Provirus in Tumors
Kettmann, Richard ULg; Deschamps, J.; Couez, D. et al

in Journal of Virology (1983), 47(1), 146-150

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See detailChromosome localization changes in the Trypanosoma cruzi nucleus.
Elias, M Carolina Q B; Faria, Marcella; Mortara, Renato A et al

in Eukaryotic Cell (2002), 1(6), 944-53

Chromosome localization in the interphase nuclei of eukaryotes depends on gene replication and transcription. Little is known about chromosome localization in protozoan parasites such as trypanosomes ... [more ▼]

Chromosome localization in the interphase nuclei of eukaryotes depends on gene replication and transcription. Little is known about chromosome localization in protozoan parasites such as trypanosomes, which have unique mechanisms for the control of gene expression, with most genes being posttranscriptionally regulated. In the present study, we examined where the chromosomes are replicated in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease. The replication sites, identified by the incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine, are located at the nuclear periphery in proliferating epimastigote forms in the early S phase of the cell cycle. When the S phase ends and cells progress through the cell cycle, 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling is observed in the nuclear interior, suggesting that chromosomes move. We next monitored chromosome locations in different stages of the cell cycle by using a satellite DNA sequence as a probe in a fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. We found two distinct labeling patterns according to the cell cycle stage. The first one is seen in the G(1) phase, in hydroxyurea-arrested epimastigotes or in trypomastigotes, which are differentiated nondividing forms. In all of these forms the satellite DNA is found in dots randomly dispersed in the nucleus. The other pattern is found in cells from the S phase to the G(2) phase. In these cells, the satellite DNA is found preferentially at the nuclear periphery. The labeling at the nuclear periphery disappears only after mitosis. Also, DNA detected with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is found distributed throughout the nuclear space in the G(1) phase but concentrated at the nuclear periphery in the S phase to the G(2) phase. These results strongly suggest that T. cruzi chromosomes move and, after entering the S phase, become constrained at the nuclear periphery, where replication occurs. [less ▲]

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See detailChromosome-encoded beta-lactamases of Citrobacter diversus. Interaction with beta-iodopenicillanate and labelling of the active site.
Amicosante, G; Oratore, A; Joris, Bernard ULg et al

in Biochemical Journal (1988), 254(3), 891-3

Both forms of the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of Citrobacter diversus react with beta-iodopenicillanate at a rate characteristic of class A beta-lactamases. The active site of form I was labelled ... [more ▼]

Both forms of the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of Citrobacter diversus react with beta-iodopenicillanate at a rate characteristic of class A beta-lactamases. The active site of form I was labelled with the same reagent. The sequence of the peptide obtained after trypsin hydrolysis is identical with that of a peptide obtained in a similar manner from the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of Klebsiella pneumoniae. [less ▲]

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See detailChromosome-encoded CTX-M-3 from Kluyvera ascorbata: a possible origin of plasmid-borne CTX-M-1-derived cefotaximases
Rodriguez, M. M.; Power, Pablo ULg; Radice, M. et al

in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2004), 48(12), 4895-4897

A gene identical to plasmid-borne bla(CTX-M-3) is present in the chromosome of one Kluyvera ascorbata strain. It is associated with a structure including an inverted repeat right and an open reading frame ... [more ▼]

A gene identical to plasmid-borne bla(CTX-M-3) is present in the chromosome of one Kluyvera ascorbata strain. It is associated with a structure including an inverted repeat right and an open reading frame 477-like gene probably involved in the mobilization of bla(CTX-M-3). Two other K. ascorbata strains rendered the previously described bla(KLUA-9) gene. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic annular lesions of the cheeks
LOTHER, Anne Sophia; ARRESE ESTRADA, Jorge ULg; NIKKELS, Arjen ULg

in International Journal of Dermatology (2013), (52), 649-650

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See detailChronic annular lesions of the cheeks
LOTHER, Anne-Sophia; ARRESE ESTRADA, Jorge ULg; NIKKELS, Arjen ULg

in International Journal of Dermatology (2012)

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See detailChronic bronchopulmonary diseases in dogs
Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Proceedings of the 24th Program - Topical Symposium on diseases of small animals - Portoroz - Slovenia (2011, April)

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See detailChronic bronchopulmonary diseases in dogs : an overview
Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Proceedings of the 55th Annual Conference of the German Small Animal Veterinary Association (2009, November)

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See detailChronic cough in cats
Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Proceedings of the Fecava Congress, Lille, France, Nov 27th-30th, 2009 (2009, November)

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See detailChronic cough in horses : environmental management and aerosol therapy
Art, Tatiana ULg

in Tierarztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere (2004), 32 (G)

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See detailChronic Cutaneous Hyalophomycosis by Paecilomyces
BOUFFLETTE, Nicolas ULg; Arrese Estrada, Jorge ULg; LEONARD, Philippe ULg et al

in Open Dermatology Journal (2014), 8

Paecilomyces lilacinus is a ubiquitous saprophytic fungus that rarely causes infections in humans, frequently affecting the eyes and the skin. Cutaneous and subcutaneous infections mainly occur in ... [more ▼]

Paecilomyces lilacinus is a ubiquitous saprophytic fungus that rarely causes infections in humans, frequently affecting the eyes and the skin. Cutaneous and subcutaneous infections mainly occur in immunocompromised hosts but have occasionally been reported in immunocompetent patients. The clinical spectrum is highly heterogeneous and diagnosis is often delayed. A 60-year-old woman with idiopathic chronic necrotizing vasculitis treated since 10 years with a series of immunosuppressive therapies presented since three years various clinical presentations of chronic hyalohyphomycosis caused by P. lilacinus. Diagnosis was only obtained three years after the first clinical signs, following the histologic analysis of the surgical excision of a cutaneous abscess. Treatment with oral voriconazole was successful. This case report illustrates the highly heterogeneous clinical aspects of hyalohyphomycosis by P. lilacinus leading to a delay in diagnosis and treatment, particularly in the immunosuppressed patient. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic disorders of consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; BODART, Olivier ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Canavero, Sergio (Ed.) Surgical Principles of Therapeutic Cortical Stimulation (2015)

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See detailChronic ethanol exposure during adolescence alters the behavioral responsiveness to ethanol in adult mice
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2012), 229

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present ... [more ▼]

Alcohol exposure during early adolescence is believed to durably alter the behavioral properties of ethanol, increasing the likelihood of later alcohol-related disorders. The aim of the present experiments was to characterize changes in the behavioral effects of ethanol in adult female Swiss mice after a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence, extending from postnatal day 28 to postnatal day 42. After a chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence (daily injections of 0, 2.5 or 4 g/kg ethanol for 14 consecutive days), adult mice were tested at postnatal day 63. The locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol, together with ethanol sensitization were tested in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the sedative effects of ethanol were assessed with the loss of righting reflex procedure. Finally, in experiment 3, the anxiolytic effects of ethanol were tested with the light/dark box test. Adult mice chronically exposed to ethanol during adolescence showed a lower basal locomotor activity, but higher locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol than non-exposed mice. Additionally, these adult mice developed higher rates of ethanol sensitization after chronic re-exposure to ethanol in adulthood. Adult mice exposed to ethanol during adolescence also had a stronger tolerance to the sedative effects of high ethanol doses, although they showed no evidence of changes in the anxiolytic effects of ethanol. These results are in agreement with the thesis that chronic alcohol consumption during adolescence, especially in high amounts, increases the risk of later alcohol-related disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic exercise differentially impacts perceptual or motor inhibition as a function of age: a cross-sectional study
Albinet, Cédric; Boucard, Geoffrey; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailChronic Exposure of Pigs to Airborne Dust and Endotoxins in an Environmental Chamber: Technical Note
Urbain, B.; Prouvost, J. F.; Beerens, Dominique ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (1996), 27(6), 569-578

A new experimental setup was developed to expose pigs to dust and airborne endotoxins in an environmental chamber, at levels liable to be encountered in pig farm buildings. The following parameters were ... [more ▼]

A new experimental setup was developed to expose pigs to dust and airborne endotoxins in an environmental chamber, at levels liable to be encountered in pig farm buildings. The following parameters were evaluated in a chamber containing two pigs of 10 kg body-weight: inhalable and respirable dust gravimetric concentrations were measured using area samplers and expressed as mg/m3. The respirable dust concentration was also measured using a "TM digital microP respirable dust-measuring instrument', which has been shown to give similar results to the gravimetric method. The endotoxin concentration was evaluated using the Limulus-assay and expressed as ng/m3 of air containing the inhalable or respirable dust or as ng/mg of inhalable and respirable dust. Feed flour dust was introduced into the chamber to obtain different concentrations of inhalable and respirable dust ranging from 3.62 to 76.66 mg/m3 and from 0.24 to 1.40 mg/m3, respectively. The endotoxin concentration was modulated by mixing the feed flour with Escherichia coli endotoxins before blowing it into the chamber. The endotoxin concentrations in the air containing inhalable or respirable dust ranged from 28.9 to 270.0 ng/m3 and from 2.22 to 36.38 ng/m3, respectively, depending on the amount of endotoxins added to the dust. Data were also obtained in a piggery. The experimental setup detailed in this paper could be used to study the significance of air contaminants in the development of pig respiratory diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic exposure to ozone causes tolerance to airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs: lack of SOD role.
Vargas, M. H.; Romero, L.; Sommer, B. et al

in Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) (1998), 84(5), 1749-1755

Tolerance to respiratory effects of O3 has been demonstrated for anatomic and functional changes, but information about tolerance to O3-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is scarce. In guinea pigs ... [more ▼]

Tolerance to respiratory effects of O3 has been demonstrated for anatomic and functional changes, but information about tolerance to O3-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is scarce. In guinea pigs exposed to air or O3 (0.3 parts/million, 4 h/day, for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 days, studied 16-18 h later), pulmonary insufflation pressure changes induced by intravenous substance P (SP, 0.032-3.2 micro ug/kg) were measured, then the animals were subjected to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Bronchial rings with or without phosphoramidon were also evaluated 3 h after air or a single O3 exposure. O3 caused in vivo AHR (increased sensitivity) to SP after 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 days of exposure compared with control. However, after 48 days of exposure, O3 no longer caused AHR. Total cell, macrophage, neutrophil, and eosinophil counts in BAL were increased in most O3-exposed groups. When data from all animals were pooled, we found a highly significant correlation between degree of airway responsiveness and total cells (r = 0.55), macrophages (r = 0.54), neutrophils (r = 0.47), and eosinophils (r = 0.53), suggesting that airway inflammation is involved in development of AHR to SP. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in BAL fluids were increased (P < 0.05) after 1, 3, 6, and 12 days of O3 exposure and returned to basal levels after 24 and 48 days of exposure. O3 failed to induce hyperresponsiveness to SP in bronchial rings, and phosphoramidon increased responses to SP in air- and O3-exposed groups, suggesting that neutral endopeptidase inactivation was not involved in O3-induced AHR to SP in vivo. We conclude that chronic exposure to 0. 3 ppm O3, a concentration found in highly polluted cities, resulted in tolerance to AHR to SP in guinea pigs by an SOD-independent mechanism. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Systematic Review
Maquet, Didier ULg; Demoulin, Christophe ULg; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg

in Annales de Réadaptation et de Médecine Physique (2006), 49(6), 418-427

OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of the literature about chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). METHODS: A search of the Medline database (via Ovid and PubMed) with the key words chronic fatigue syndrome ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of the literature about chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). METHODS: A search of the Medline database (via Ovid and PubMed) with the key words chronic fatigue syndrome, diagnosis, classification, epidemiology, etiology, physiopathology, metabolism, microbiology, immunology, virology, psychology, drug therapy, rehabilitation, and therapy. The reference lists of each article were examined for additional related articles. RESULTS: CFS was defined in 1988 by the US Centes for Disease Control and Prevention. The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome has ranged from 0.2% to 0.7% in the general population. In 1994, the definition of CFS was revised by Fukuda et al. Despite various research in several topics (e.g. infection, immune systems, neuroendocrinology, autonomic activity, neuromuscular involvement), the pathophysiology remains unknown. CONCLUSION: CFS, with its various major clinical and functional impacts, should be associated with a "biopsychosocial model". Progressive muscular rehabilitation, combined with behavioral and cognitive treatment, is an essential part of therapy. [less ▲]

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