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See detailCharacterization of almond kernel oils of five almonds varieties cultivated in Eastern Morocco
Houmy, Nadia ULg; Mansouri, Farid; Ben Moumen, Abdessamad et al

Poster (2015, May 03)

This study focuses on characterization of almond kernel oils extracted mechanically from five sweet almond varieties Marcona, Fournat, Ferragnes, Ferraduel and Beldi), cultivated in eastern Morocco. Oil ... [more ▼]

This study focuses on characterization of almond kernel oils extracted mechanically from five sweet almond varieties Marcona, Fournat, Ferragnes, Ferraduel and Beldi), cultivated in eastern Morocco. Oil content, physicochemical parameters, triacylglycerol and fatty acid compositions were determined. Analyzed oils showed low acidity values that range between 0.77 – 0.88 %, peroxide values range between 6.43 – 16.39 meq/kg and Iodine values range between 98.42 – 103.90%. The principal fatty acid of almond kernel oils is oleic acid (C18:1); oils of Ferragnes-Ferraduel and Beldi varieties show higher values of C18:1 respectively of 72.87 and 71.62 %, however Fournat almond kernel oil shows the lowest content of C18:1 (63.54%). HPLC analysis of triglycerides was carried out, and results show that analyzed almond kernel oils are characterized by the dominance of trioleylglycerol (OOO) that contents range between a minimum of 31.48 % for Fournat’s oil and 43.82% for Ferragnes-Ferraduel’s oil. The oxidative stability of almond kernel oils was determined by rancimat tests as the induction period (IP, h recorded by a 743 Rancimat apparatus Metrohm, Switzerland). Results show that stability, of almond kernel oils is clearly influenced by the almond variety; Oxidative stability of tested almond kernel oils ranged between an IP = 20.28 h for Marcona oil and an IP =27.55 h for Ferragnes-Ferraduel. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of amylolysin, a novel lantibiotic from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens GA1
Arguelles Arias, Anthony ULg; Ongena, Marc ULg; Devreese, Bart et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(12),

Background: Lantibiotics are heat-stable peptides characterized by the presence of thioether amino acid lanthionine and methyllanthionine. They are capable to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria ... [more ▼]

Background: Lantibiotics are heat-stable peptides characterized by the presence of thioether amino acid lanthionine and methyllanthionine. They are capable to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus cereus, the causative agents of food-borne diseases or nosocomial infections. Lantibiotic biosynthetic machinery is encoded by gene cluster composed by a structural gene that codes for a pre-lantibiotic peptide and other genes involved in pre-lantibiotic modifications, regulation, export and immunity. Methodology/Findings: Bacillus amyloliquefaciens GA1 was found to produce an antimicrobial peptide, named amylolysin, active on an array of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin resistant S. aureus. Genome characterization led to the identification of a putative lantibiotic gene cluster that comprises a structural gene (amlA) and genes involved in modification (amlM), transport (amlT), regulation (amlKR) and immunity (amlFE). Disruption of amlA led to loss of biological activity, confirming thus that the identified gene cluster is related to amylolysin synthesis. MALDI-TOF and LC-MS analysis on purified amylolysin demonstrated that this latter corresponds to a novel lantibiotic not described to date. The ability of amylolysin to interact in vitro with the lipid II, the carrier of peptidoglycan monomers across the cytoplasmic membrane and the presence of a unique modification gene suggest that the identified peptide belongs to the group B lantibiotic. Amylolysin immunity seems to be driven by only two AmlF and AmlE proteins, which is uncommon within the Bacillus genus. Conclusion/Significance: Apart from mersacidin produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains Y2 and HIL Y-85,544728, reports on the synthesis of type B-lantibiotic in this species are scarce. This study reports on a genetic and structural characterization of another representative of the type B lantibiotic in B. amyloliquefaciens. Copyright: © 2013 Arguelles Arias et al. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an antibody panel for immunohistochemical analysis of canine muscle cells
Gofflot, Stéphanie ULg; Kischel, Philippe ULg; Thielen, Caroline ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2008), 125(3-4), 225-33

Immunohistochemistry is an indispensable tool in the assessment and characterization of lineage-specific differentiation of grafted cells in cell-based-therapy. This strategy is under investigation for ... [more ▼]

Immunohistochemistry is an indispensable tool in the assessment and characterization of lineage-specific differentiation of grafted cells in cell-based-therapy. This strategy is under investigation for the treatment of many muscle disorders and different animals such as dogs are used as models to study the tissue regeneration. The aim of the present study was to characterize an antibody panel for the analysis of canine muscle cells, useful in routinely processed formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Overall, 12 antibodies (8 mouse monoclonal and 4 goat polyclonal), validated for use on human tissues tested for cross-reactivity on canine smooth muscle (bladder, intestine, and uterus), skeletal muscle and heart. Specific staining was achieved with eight antibodies, of which six were cytoplasmic markers (desmin, HDAC8, MHC, SMA, Troponin I and Troponin T) and two were cardiac nuclear markers (GATA-4 and Nkx-2.5). This antibody panel may be useful not only for the evaluation of cell-based therapies in muscle disorders, but also for the evaluation of canine soft tissue neoplasms in veterinary pathology. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an Enterococcus Hirae Penicillin-Binding Protein 3 with Low Penicillin Affinity
Piras, Graziella; El Kharroubi, Aboubaker; van Beeumen, Jozef et al

in Journal of Bacteriology (1990), 172(12), 6856-6862

Enterococcus hirae S185, a clinical isolate from swine intestine, exhibits a relatively high resistance to penicillin and contains two 77-kDa penicillin-binding proteins 3 of high (PBP 3s) and low (PBP 3r ... [more ▼]

Enterococcus hirae S185, a clinical isolate from swine intestine, exhibits a relatively high resistance to penicillin and contains two 77-kDa penicillin-binding proteins 3 of high (PBP 3s) and low (PBP 3r) affinity to penicillin, respectively. A laboratory mutant S185r has been obtained which overproduces PBP 3r and has a highly increased resistance to penicillin. Peptide fragments specifically produced by trypsin and SV8 protease digestions of PBP 3r were isolated, and the amino acid sequences of their amino terminal regions were determined. On the basis of these sequences, oligonucleotides were synthesized and used as primers to generate, by polymerization chain reaction, a 233-bp DNA fragment the sequence of which translated into a 73-amino-acid peptide segment of PBP 3r. These structural data led to the conclusion that the E. hirae PBP 3r and the methicillin-resistant staphylococcal PBP 2' are members of the same class of high-Mr PBPs. As shown by immunological tests, PBP 3r is not related to PBP 3s but, in contrast, is related to the 71-kDa PBP 5 of low penicillin affinity which is responsible for penicillin resistance in E. hirae ATCC 9790 and R40. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an in vivo model of VZV latency in the nervous system
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S. et al

Conference (1994)

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See detailCharacterization of an Insulating Material with regards to ECCS. Recommendations for the Fire Safety of Steel Structures
Bruls, Aloïs; Cajot, Louis-Guy; Franssen, Jean-Marc ULg

in Journal of Constructional Steel Research (1988), 9(2), 111-135

How to characterize an insulating product by an apparent constant thermal conductivity

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See detailCharacterization of an internal type-II NADH dehydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondria
Remacle, Claire ULg

in 15th International Conference on the Cell & Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas (2012, June)

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See detailCharacterization of an original model of myocardial infarction provoked by coronary artery thrombosis induced by ferric chloride in pig
Dogné, Jean-Michel ULg; Rolin, Stéphanie; Petein, Michel et al

in Thrombosis Research (2005), 116(5), 431-442

Background: Great advances have been made in the prevention of thrombotic disorders by developments of new pharmacological and surgical treatments. Animal models of arterial thrombosis have largely ... [more ▼]

Background: Great advances have been made in the prevention of thrombotic disorders by developments of new pharmacological and surgical treatments. Animal models of arterial thrombosis have largely contributed to the discovery and to the validation of original treatments. The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate an original model of acute myocardial infarction provoked in pig by thrombosis of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery induced by topical application of ferric chloride solution. Methods and results: Myocardial infarction, resulting from an occlusive and adherent mixed thrombus formed in the LAD coronary artery, was examined at macroscopic level using dual staining technique (Evans blue dye; triphenyltetrazolium chloride) and at microscopic level using conventional histological analyses and immunohistochemical detection of desmin. Biochemical markers (troponin T and ATP), platelet reactivity and standard hemodynamic parameters (such as stroke volume, ejection fraction, stroke work and cardiac output) have also been evaluated. From these analyses, it was demonstrated that each pig developed a transmural area of irreversible damage mainly located in the anteroseptal region of the left ventricle. The more progressive development of coronary artery occlusion, as compared to an abrupt Ligation, was accompanied by a correspondingly progressive impairment in hemodynamics. Conclusion: We conclude that this original porcine model of myocardial infarction is quite close to clinical pathophysiological conditions, such as thrombus formation occurring after atherosclerotic plaque rupture. This certainly constitutes a further argument in favour of this model to assess pharmaceutical or mechanical support of an acutely ischemic heart. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an unusual thyroid response unit in the promoter of the human placental lactogen gene
Voz, Marianne ULg; Peers, Bernard ULg; Belayew, Alexandra et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1991), 266(20), 13397-404

The human placental lactogen B (hCS-B) promoter activity is strongly stimulated by thyroid hormones in the rat pituitary GC cell line. The minimal DNA sequence required for stimulation, as determined by ... [more ▼]

The human placental lactogen B (hCS-B) promoter activity is strongly stimulated by thyroid hormones in the rat pituitary GC cell line. The minimal DNA sequence required for stimulation, as determined by transfection with 5' and 3' deletion mutants, spans 67 base pairs, from coordinate -97 to -31. DNase I footprinting experiments show that this thyroid response unit includes two adjacent binding sites: one for the thyroid receptor (-67/-41), the other for the pituitary-specific factor GHF1 (-95/-68). Neither region alone is sufficient to confer thyroid responsiveness. The thyroid receptor binding element (TBE) does not contain any repeats or palindromes but is composed of two different domains, one of which is very similar to the half-palindromic motif described by Glass et al. (Glass, C.K., Holloway, J.M., Devary, O.L., and Rosenfeld, M.G. (1988) Cell 54, 313-323). The other is very rich in purine. The normal human growth hormone (hGH-N) promoter, which is 94% similar to the hCS-B promoter, differs from its hCS-B counterpart precisely in this TBE. This difference may explain the opposite 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) regulation of these two genes. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an up-stream promoter directing extrapituitary expression of the human prolactin gene
Berwaer, M.; Martial, Joseph ULg; Davis, J. R.

in Molecular Endocrinology (1994), 8(5), 635-42

The human PRL gene is expressed outside pituitary lactotrophs in decidualized endometrium and lymphoid cells, but here the mRNA contains a 5'-untranslated region from an additional noncoding exon 1a. We ... [more ▼]

The human PRL gene is expressed outside pituitary lactotrophs in decidualized endometrium and lymphoid cells, but here the mRNA contains a 5'-untranslated region from an additional noncoding exon 1a. We have isolated a genomic DNA clone containing human PRL exon 1a with 2800 basepairs (bp) of 5'-flanking sequences. Sequencing locates exon 1a -5840 bp up-stream of the pituitary start site. To study its suspected regulatory function, various lengths of the 5'-flanking region were linked to the luciferase (Luc) reporter gene. Their ability to direct gene expression has been analyzed in transfection studies. The proximal 1620 bp of promoter sequence directed Luc expression in the T-lymphoid Jurkat cell line, and this was unaffected by 5'-deletion to the proximal 453 bp. However, further 5'-deletion to the most proximal 67 bp drastically reduced this activity by 90%. The exon 1a promoter was inactive in pituitary GH3 cells and HeLa cells; in contrast, the exon 1b pituitary promoter, active in GH3 cells, was inactive in Jurkat cells. DNase-I footprinting studies and further 5'- and 3'-deletion analysis identified factor-binding sites within an enhancer element located at -375/-212 bp, which contributed approximately 50% of the promoter activity. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of anti-GBM antibody reactivity subsequent to renal transplantation in two Alport Syndrome patients
Dehan, Pierre ULg; Weber, M.; Reeders, S. et al

in Journal of the American Society of Nephrology [=JASN] (1993), 4

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See detailCharacterization of antiplatelet activity of ticlopidine and acetylsalicylic acid by PFA-100
Dogne, J. M.; De Leval, X.; Neven, P. et al

Poster (1999, November 20)

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See detailCharacterization of antiplatelet activity of ticlopidine and acetylsalicylic acid by PFA-100
Dogne, J.-M.; De Leval, X.; Neven, P. et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2000), 14

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See detailCharacterization of Arthrospira / Spirulina strains: Molecular Aspects
Baurain, Denis ULg; Scheldeman, Patsy; Renquin, Laurent et al

Report (1999)

We present the results of a phylogenetic study, based on ARDRA of the rDNA operon, of 38 Arthrospira (‘Spirulina’) cultivated clonal strains from four continents. In addition, duplicates from different ... [more ▼]

We present the results of a phylogenetic study, based on ARDRA of the rDNA operon, of 38 Arthrospira (‘Spirulina’) cultivated clonal strains from four continents. In addition, duplicates from different culture collections or markedly different morphotypes of particular strains established as clonal cultures were treated as separate entries, resulting in a total of 54 tested cultures. Three living samples from Earthrise Farms ponds (September 1997), four freeze-dried samples from EF ponds (August 1996, February and March 1997) and a powder of ‘Spirulina pacifica’ were also included in the study. The strain Spirulina laxissima SAG 256.80 was used as outgroup. The 16S rRNA genes appeared too conserved for discrimination of the strains by ARDRA, and thus the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) was selected as a molecular taxonomic marker. The ITS sequences situated between the 16S and the 23S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and yielded amplicons of about 540 bp. The amplicons were digested with four restriction enzymes (EcoR V, Hha I, Hinf I, Mse I) and the banding patterns obtained were analyzed. Cluster analysis showed the separation of all the strains into two main clusters (Clusters I and II), of which Cluster I was divided into Subclusters I.A and I.B. Four freeze-dried samples from EF cultivation ponds (Summer 1996 and Winter 1997), as well as a sample of powder sent as ‘Spirulina pacifica’ appeared to contain a mixture of genotypes from Clusters I and II. No clear relationships could be observed between this division into two clusters and the geographic origin of the strains, or their designation in the culture collections, or their morphology. Direct use of cells for PCR seemed to inhibit the amplification reaction. This was overcome by the design of a crude lysis protocol and addition of BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) in the PCR mix. In order to study in more depth the genotypic relationships of Arthrospira, we have obtained the ITS sequence of 19 cultures and 7 samples (living or freeze-dried samples from EF ponds, dried natural samples and one commercial pill). The data confirmed the existence of Clusters I and II, but also subdivided each of them into two Subclusters (A and B). In three cultures, simultaneous presence of types II.A and II.B was detected. It is likely that sequences of both types are contained in different copies of the ITS and that the three cultures represent cryptic duplicates of one unique genotype. The strains cultivated in the EF ponds belong to types I.A, II.A and II.B, while the winter ponds samples were a mixture of types I and II. Though there was surprisingly little sequence variability in the ITS sequences, we designed PCR primers which are specific for the two clusters (44 different positions) and for the four subclusters (2 to 4 different positions). [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization Of Astrocaryum Macrocalyx Kernel Fat.
Lognay, Georges ULg; Desmedt, A.; Mejia, K. et al

in Grasas Y Aceites (1995), 46(4-5), 308-310

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See detailCharacterization of bacteria in biopsies of colon and stools by high throughput sequencing of the V2 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene in human.
Momozawa, Yukihide; Deffontaine Deurbroeck, Valérie ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg et al

in PloS one (2011), 6(2), 16952

BACKGROUND: The characterization of the human intestinal microflora and their interactions with the host have been identified as key components in the study of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The characterization of the human intestinal microflora and their interactions with the host have been identified as key components in the study of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases. High-throughput sequencing has enabled culture-independent studies to deeply analyze bacteria in the gut. It is possible with this technology to systematically analyze links between microbes and the genetic constitution of the host, such as DNA polymorphisms and methylation, and gene expression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study the V2 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene using 454 pyrosequencing from seven anatomic regions of human colon and two types of stool specimens were analyzed. The study examined the number of reads needed to ascertain differences between samples, the effect of DNA extraction procedures and PCR reproducibility, and differences between biopsies and stools in order to design a large scale systematic analysis of gut microbes. It was shown (1) that sequence coverage lower than 1,000 reads influenced quantitative and qualitative differences between samples measured by UniFrac distances. Distances between samples became stable after 1,000 reads. (2) Difference of extracted bacteria was observed between the two DNA extraction methods. In particular, Firmicutes Bacilli were not extracted well by one method. (3) Quantitative and qualitative difference in bacteria from ileum to rectum colon were not observed, but there was a significant positive trend between distances within colon and quantitative differences. Between sample type, biopsies or stools, quantitative and qualitative differences were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Results of human colonic bacteria analyzed using high-throughput sequencing were highly dependent on the experimental design, especially the number of sequence reads, DNA extraction method, and sample type. [less ▲]

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