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See detailCerebral metabolic correlates of four dementia scales in Alzheimer's disease
Salmon, Eric ULg; Lespagnard, Solange ULg; Marique, Patricia et al

in Journal of Neurology (2005), 252(3), 283-290

Different scales can be used to evaluate dementia severity in Alzheimers disease (AD). They do assess different cognitive or functional abilities, but their global scores are frequently in mutual ... [more ▼]

Different scales can be used to evaluate dementia severity in Alzheimers disease (AD). They do assess different cognitive or functional abilities, but their global scores are frequently in mutual correlation. Functional imaging provides an objective method for the staging of dementia severity. Positron emission tomography was used to assess the relationship between brain metabolism and four dementia scales that reflect a patients global cognitive abilities (mini mental state), caregivers evaluation of cognitive impairment (newly designed scale), daily living functioning (instrumental activities of daily living) and global dementia (clinical dementia rating). We wondered whether different clinical dementia scales would be related to severity of metabolic impairment in the same brain regions, and might reflect impairment of common cognitive processes. 225 patients with probable AD were recruited in a prospective multicentre European study. All clinical scales were related to brain metabolism in associative temporal, parietal or frontal areas. A factorial analysis demonstrated that all scales could be classified in a single factor. That factor was highly correlated to decrease of cerebral activity in bilateral parietal and temporal cortices, precuneus, and left middle frontal gyrus. This finding suggests that global scores for all scales provided similar information on the neural substrate of dementia severity. Capitalizing on the neuroimaging literature, dementia severity reflected by reduced metabolism in posterior and frontal associative areas in AD might be related to a decrease of controlled processes. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral metabolism before and after external trigeminal nerve stimulation in episodic migraine
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2016)

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See detailCerebral metabolism during vegetative state and after recovery to consciousness
Laureys, Steven ULg; Lemaire, Christian ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (1999), 67(1), 121-122

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See detailCerebral Monitoring Devices: What We Pay For
BONHOMME, Vincent ULg; Hans, Pol ULg

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2006), 57(4), 419-28

view paper, the authors analyse advantages, pitfalls and economical considerations related to depth of anaesthesia monitoring. They first describe the most widely distributed monitors in Europe, and the ... [more ▼]

view paper, the authors analyse advantages, pitfalls and economical considerations related to depth of anaesthesia monitoring. They first describe the most widely distributed monitors in Europe, and the physiological basis of each index. The optimal use of those monitors and their demonstrated clinical benefits are detailed, as well as the circumstances that can lead to erroneous information or interpretation. Knowledge of patients and practitioners, as well as beliefs and expectations regarding depth of anaesthesia monitoring are discussed. Finally, the authors give their own opinion regarding the use of depth of anaesthesia monitoring, according to clinical benefit and economical considerations. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral processing in the minimally conscious state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Perrin, Fabien; Faymonville, Marie ULg et al

in Neurology (2004), 63(5), 916-918

We studied a patient in a minimally conscious state using PET and cognitive evoked potentials. Cerebral metabolism was below half of normal values. Auditory stimuli with emotional valence ( infant cries ... [more ▼]

We studied a patient in a minimally conscious state using PET and cognitive evoked potentials. Cerebral metabolism was below half of normal values. Auditory stimuli with emotional valence ( infant cries and the patient's own name) induced a much more widespread activation than did meaningless noise; the activation pattern was comparable with that previously obtained in controls. Cognitive potentials showed preserved P300 responses to the patient's own name. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cerebral protective effect of anaesthetics
HANS, Pol; BONHOMME, Vincent ULg

in Current Anaesthesia and Critical Care (2000), 11

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See detailCerebral response to patient's own name in the vegetative and minimally conscious states
Di, H. B.; Yu, S. M.; Weng, X. C. et al

in Neurology (2007), 68(12), 895-899

Background: A challenge in the management of severely brain- damaged patients with altered states of consciousness is the differential diagnosis between the vegetative state ( VS) and the minimally ... [more ▼]

Background: A challenge in the management of severely brain- damaged patients with altered states of consciousness is the differential diagnosis between the vegetative state ( VS) and the minimally conscious state ( MCS), especially for the gray zone separating these clinical entities. Objective: To evaluate the differences in brain activation in response to presentation of the patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice ( SON- FV) in patients with VS and MCS. Methods: By using fMRI, we prospectively studied residual cerebral activation to SON- FV in seven patients with VS and four with MCS. Behavioral evaluation was performed by means of standardized testing up to 3 months post- fMRI. Results: Two patients with VS failed to show any significant cerebral activation. Three patients with VS showed SON- FV induced activation within the primary auditory cortex. Finally, two patients with VS and all four patients with MCS not only showed activation in primary auditory cortex but also in hierarchically higher order associative temporal areas. These two patients with VS showing the most widespread activation subsequently showed clinical improvement to MCS observed 3 months after their fMRI scan. Conclusion: The cerebral responses to patient's own name spoken by a familiar voice as measured by fMRI might be a useful tool to preclinically distinguish minimally conscious state - like cognitive processing in some patients behaviorally classified as vegetative. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral responses and role of the prefrontal cortex in conditioned pain modulation: an fMRI study in healthy subjects
Bogdanov, Volodymyr; Vigano, Alessandro; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2015)

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See detailCerebral resting state fluctuations predict somatosensory perception
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2007, May), 254(Suppl. 3), 42

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See detailCerebral subarachnoid blood migration consecutive to a lumbar haematoma after spinal anaesthesia
Hans, Grégory ULg; Senard, Marc ULg; Ledoux, Didier ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (2008), 52

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See detailCerebral subarachnoid blood migration consecutive to a lumbar haematoma after spinal anaesthesia
Goujon-Dubois, Julie; Hans, Grégory ULg; Senard, Marc ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2008), 59(3), 223

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See detailCerebrospinal fluid level of protein S100 beta in healthy horse : a preliminary study
Lopez, D; De Moffarts, Brieuc; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

in Tierärztliche Praxis Kleintiere (2004)

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See detailCerebrospinal Fluid Collection Tubes: a critical issue for Alzheimer Disease diagnosis
Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Pelpel, Mathieu; Tholance, Yannick et al

in Clinical Chemistry (2012), 58

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See detailCerebrospinal fluid IgG and IgM indexes as indicators of active neurosyphilis
Hische, EAH; Tutuarima, JA; Wolters, EC et al

in Clinical Chemistry (1988), 34

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See detailCerebrospinal fluid neurophysins in affective illness and schizophrenia
Linkowski, Paul; Geenen, Vincent ULg; Kerkhofs, Myriam et al

in European Archives of Psychiatry and Neurological Sciences (1984), 234

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See detailCerebrospinal fluid pterins and folates in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome: A new phenotype
Blau, N.; Bonafé, L.; Krägeloh-Mann, I. et al

in Neurology (2003), 61(5), 642-647

Objective: To describe three unrelated children with a distinctive variant of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) characterized by microcephaly, severe mental and motor retardation, dyskinesia or spasticity ... [more ▼]

Objective: To describe three unrelated children with a distinctive variant of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) characterized by microcephaly, severe mental and motor retardation, dyskinesia or spasticity, and occasional seizures. Results: Neuroimaging showed bilateral calcification of basal ganglia and white matter. CSF glucose, protein, cell count, and interferon alpha were normal. Abnormal CSF findings included extremely high neopterin (293 to 814 nmol/L; normal 12 to 30 nmol/L) and biopterin (226 to 416 nmol/L; normal 15 to 40 nmol/L) combined with lowered 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (23 to 48 nmol/L; normal 64 to 182 nmol/L) concentrations in two patients. The absence of pleocytosis and normal CSF interferon alpha was a characteristic finding compared to the classic AGS syndrome. Genetic and enzymatic tests excluded disorders of tetrahydrobiopterin metabolism, including mutation analysis of GTP cyclohydrolase feed-back regulatory protein. CSF investigations in three patients with classic AGS also showed increased pterins and partially lowered folate levels. Conclusions: Intrathecal overproduction of pterins is the first biochemical abnormality identified in patients with AGS variants. Long-term substitution with folinic acid (2-4 mg/kg/day) resulted in substantial clinical recovery with normalization of CSF folates and pterins in one patient and clinical improvement in another. The underlying defect remains unknown. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, a rare, severe, but treatable metabolic disorder
Delstanche, S.; Deflandre, T.; Otto, B. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2013), 68(4), 171-6

Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare and treatable autosomal recessive disease. The diagnosis should be suspected in the presence of a suggestive clinical triad characterized by early-onset ... [more ▼]

Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare and treatable autosomal recessive disease. The diagnosis should be suspected in the presence of a suggestive clinical triad characterized by early-onset cataract, tendinous xanthomata and neurological symptoms and signs, notably cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation and pyramidal syndrome.The diagnosis is confirmed by demonstrating an increased blood level of cholestanol, or/and by molecular genetic analysis.In typical cases, brain MRI shows bilateral hyperintensity of the cerebellar nucleus dentatus together with cerebral atrophy and leukoencephalopathy. The treatment is based on the administration of chenodeoxycholic acid. The aim is to restore the negative feedback on the enzymatic cascade altered by mutation in the gene CYP27 which induces a 27-hydroxylase deficiency [less ▲]

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