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See detailCognition sociale
Dardenne, Benoît ULg

in van Zanten, Agnès (Ed.) Dictionnaire de l'éducation (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (17 ULg)
See detailCognition sociale et pragmatisme : une ancienne perspective et un nouveau regard
Dardenne, Benoît ULg

in Leyens, J. (Ed.) L'ère de la cognition. Vol. 3 (1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULg)
See detailCognition, émotion et troubles de la conscience
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg

Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
See detailCognition, motivation and emotion : Dynamics in the academic environment : Fedora Psyche Conference in Lisbon, 2002
Rott, Gerhart; Figueiredo Dias, Graça; Broonen, Jean-Paul ULg

Book published by Fedora (2005)

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See detailCognitive abilities underlying L2 vocabulary acquisition in an early L2-immersion education context: A longitudinal study
Nicolay, Anne-Catherine ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg

in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (2013), 115

First- (L1) and second-language (L2) lexical development has been found to be strongly associated to phonological processing abilities such as phonological short-term memory (STM), phonological awareness ... [more ▼]

First- (L1) and second-language (L2) lexical development has been found to be strongly associated to phonological processing abilities such as phonological short-term memory (STM), phonological awareness and speech perception. Lexical development seems also to be linked to attentional and executive skills such as auditory attention, flexibility and response inhibition. The aim of this four-wave longitudinal study was to determine to what extent L2 vocabulary acquired through the particular school context of early L2 immersion education is linked to the same cognitive abilities. Sixty-one French-speaking 5-year-old kindergartners who had just been enrolled in English immersion classes were administered a battery of tasks assessing these 3 phonological processing abilities and 3 attentional/executive skills. One, two and three school years later, their English vocabulary knowledge was measured. Multiple regression analyses showed that, among the assessed phonological processing abilities, phonological STM and speech perception, but not phonological awareness, appeared to underlie L2 vocabulary acquisition in this context of an early L2 immersion school program, at least during the first steps of acquisition. Similarly, among the assessed attentional/executive skills, auditory attention and flexibility, but not response inhibition, appeared to be involved during the first steps of L2 vocabulary acquisition in such an immersion school context. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive advantage in children enrolled in a second-language immersion elementary school program for 3 years
Nicolay, Anne-Catherine ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg

in Bilingualism : Language and Cognition (2013), 16(3), 597-607

Early bilingualism acquired from home or community is generally considered to positively influence cognitive development. The purpose of the present study was to determine to what extent bilingualism ... [more ▼]

Early bilingualism acquired from home or community is generally considered to positively influence cognitive development. The purpose of the present study was to determine to what extent bilingualism acquired through a second-language immersion education has a similar effect. Participants included a total of 106 French-speaking 8-year-old children drawn from two language groups: 53 children enrolled in English immersion classes since the age of 5 (the immersion group) and 53 children enrolled in monolingual French-speaking classes (the monolingual group). The two groups were matched for verbal and nonverbal intelligence and SES. They were administered a battery of tasks assessing attentional and executive skills. The immersion group’s reaction times were significantly faster than those of the monolingual group on tasks assessing alerting, auditory selective attention, divided attention and mental flexibility, but not interference inhibition. These results show that, after only 3 years, a second-language immersion school experience also produces some of the cognitive benefits associated with early bilingualism. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive and affective mechanisms involved in hallucination-proneness
Laroi, Frank ULg

Scientific conference (2006, March 22)

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See detailCognitive and affective mechanisms involved in hallucination-proneness
Laroi, Frank ULg

Conference (2009, April 09)

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See detailCognitive and affective mechanisms involved in hallucination-proneness
Laroi, Frank ULg

Conference (2008, November 08)

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See detailCognitive and emotional antecedents and consequences of achievement goals in 1st year university students
Broonen, Jean-Paul ULg

in Rott, G. (Ed.) Cognition, motivation and emotion : dynamics in the academic environment : Fedora Psyche Conference in Lisbon, 2002 (2005)

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See detailCognitive and Emotional Empathy in Alcohol-Dependent Patients (ADs): a Review of the Literature
Dethier, Marie ULg; Douws, Laetitia; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Revue Francophone de Clinique Comportementale et Cognitive (2011), 16(2), 56-69

The purpose of this article is to assert the current state of the scientific literature on the issues regarding empathy in alcohol-dependents patients (ADs). We will first explain what the term « empathy ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this article is to assert the current state of the scientific literature on the issues regarding empathy in alcohol-dependents patients (ADs). We will first explain what the term « empathy » covers and the distinction made between cognitive and emotional empathy. We will describe then the different studies that got interested in the capacities for empathy in ADs patients. These studies concern predominantly one precise aspect of cognitive empathy: the capacity to infer an emotional state on the basis of emotional facial expressions (EFEs). Up to now, the other domain of cognitive empathy –the decoding of affective prosody and of nonverbal mulimodal stimuli and the attribution of intentions and beliefs– and emotional empathy are under-investigated in alcohol-dependence. In this review of the literature, we will identify the consequences that empathy problems could have on interpersonal relationships as well as the domains that still have to be to investigate regarding empathy in ADs patients, and notably the remediation of these deficits. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive and emotional processes during dreaming: a neuroimaging view.
Desseilles, Martin ULg; Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg et al

in Consciousness & Cognition (2011), 20(4), 998-1008

Dream is a state of consciousness characterized by internally-generated sensory, cognitive and emotional experiences occurring during sleep. Dream reports tend to be particularly abundant, with complex ... [more ▼]

Dream is a state of consciousness characterized by internally-generated sensory, cognitive and emotional experiences occurring during sleep. Dream reports tend to be particularly abundant, with complex, emotional, and perceptually vivid experiences after awakenings from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This is why our current knowledge of the cerebral correlates of dreaming, mainly derives from studies of REM sleep. Neuroimaging results show that REM sleep is characterized by a specific pattern of regional brain activity. We demonstrate that this heterogeneous distribution of brain activity during sleep explains many typical features in dreams. Reciprocally, specific dream characteristics suggest the activation of selective brain regions during sleep. Such an integration of neuroimaging data of human sleep, mental imagery, and the content of dreams is critical for current models of dreaming; it also provides neurobiological support for an implication of sleep and dreaming in some important functions such as emotional regulation. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive and motor development in preschool and school-aged children after neonatal arterial switch operation
Hovels-Gurich, H. H.; SEGHAYE, Marie-Christine ULg; Dabritz, S. et al

in Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (The) (1997), 114(4), 578-85

OBJECTIVE: The developmental status of children beyond 3 years of age after the neonatal arterial switch operation has not yet been systematically evaluated and is the topic of the present work. METHODS ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The developmental status of children beyond 3 years of age after the neonatal arterial switch operation has not yet been systematically evaluated and is the topic of the present work. METHODS: Seventy-seven unselected children operated on as neonates with combined deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and low-flow cardiopulmonary bypass were examined at an age of 3.2 to 9.4 years (5.4 +/- 1.6 years, mean +/- standard deviation). Clinical neurologic status, standard scores of intelligence, acquired abilities and vocabulary, and standardized tests on gross motor and fine motor functions were carried out, and the results were related to preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative status and management. RESULTS: Neurologic impairment was more frequent (9.1%) than in the normal population. Intelligence was not different in these patients compared with normal children (p = 0.11), but motor function, vocabulary, and acquired abilities were poorer. Reduced intelligence was found in 9.1%, fine motor dysfunction in 22.1%, and gross motor dysfunction in 23.4% of the children. Intelligence was weakly but significantly inversely related to the duration of bypass (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.25, p = 0.03) and tended to be inversely related to the duration of circulatory arrest (-0.21, p = 0.07), but not to core cooling time on bypass or degree of hypothermia. Gross motor function, vocabulary, and acquired abilities were not significantly related to any of the perioperative parameters considered. No correlation was found between the test results and the variables perinatal asphyxia, perioperative and postoperative cardiocirculatory insufficiency, resuscitation events, and plexal or intraventricular cerebral hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: The neonatal arterial switch operation with combined circulatory arrest and low-flow bypass in our experience is associated with neurologic as well as fine and gross motor impairment but appears to be well tolerated concerning cognitive functions as based on formal intelligence testing. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive and neuroimaging evidence of impaired interaction between Self and memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 51

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect ... [more ▼]

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect (SRRE)). The current study examined this interaction at the behavioural level and its neural correlates in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Healthy older controls (HC) and AD patients performed trait-adjectives judgements either for self-relevance or for other-relevance (encoding phase). In a first experiment, the encoding and subsequent yes-no recognition phases were administrated in an MRI scanner. Brain activation as measured by fMRI was examined during self-relevance judgements and anatomical images were used to search for correlation between the memory advantage for self-related items and grey matter density (GMD). In a second experiment, participants described the retrieval experience that had driven their recognition decisions (familiarity vs. recollective experience). The behavioural results revealed that the SRE and SRRE were impaired in AD patients compared to HC participants. Furthermore, verbal reports revealed that the retrieval of self-related information was preferentially associated with the retrieval of contextual details, such as source memory in the HC participants, but less so in the AD patients. Our imaging findings revealed that both groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) at encoding during self-relevance judgments. However, the variable and limited memory advantage for self-related information was associated with GMD in the lateral prefrontal cortex in the AD patients, a region supporting high-order processes linking self and memory. These findings suggest that even if AD patients engage MPFC during self-referential judgments, the retrieval of self-related memories is qualitatively and quantitatively impaired in relation with altered high-order processes in the lateral PFC. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cognitive approach to familiar face processing in human subjects
Brédart, Serge ULg; Bruyer, R.

in Behavioural Processes (1994), 33(1-2), 213-232

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See detailA cognitive approach to hallucination-proneness in non-clinical subjects
Laroi, Frank ULg

Doctoral thesis (2003)

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See detailCognitive deficits in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome compared to those with major depressive disorder and healthy controls
Constant, Eric; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Gillain, Benoît et al

in Clinical Neurology & Neurosurgery (2011), 113(4), 295-302

Object: It is frequently reported that cognitive complaints accompany the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). However, studies on cognition in CFS have yielded conflicting results. The neuropsychological ... [more ▼]

Object: It is frequently reported that cognitive complaints accompany the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). However, studies on cognition in CFS have yielded conflicting results. The neuropsychological literature on this subject is plagued by methodological difficulties, including, for example, the existence of comorbid depression, which is also associated with cognitive impairments. Patients and Methods: Twenty-five patients with CFS, 25 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 25 healthy control subjects were given standardized tests of attention, working memory, and verbal and visual episodic memory, and were also tested for effects related to lack of effort/simulation, suggestibility, and fatigue. Results: Patients with CFS had slower phasic alertness, and also had impaired working, visual and verbal episodic memory compared to controls. They were, however, no more sensitive than the other groups to suggestibility or to fatigue induced during the cognitive session. Cognitive impairments in MDD patients were strongly associated with depression and subjective fatigue; in patients with CFS, there was a weaker correlation between cognition and depression (and no correlation with fatigue). Conclusions: This study confirms the presence of an objective impairment in attention and memory in patients with CFS but with good mobilization of effort and without exaggerated suggestibility. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cognitive effects of anxiety on sexual arousal
Kempeneers, Philippe ULg; Pallincourt, Romain; Blairy, Sylvie ULg

in Weingarten, S.P.; Penat, H.O (Eds.) Cognitive psychology research developments (2009)

Anxiety and sexual arousal have often been considered as incompatible. Since the end of the 20th Century, however, researches have impaired theories centred on the inhibitory effect of the stress and on ... [more ▼]

Anxiety and sexual arousal have often been considered as incompatible. Since the end of the 20th Century, however, researches have impaired theories centred on the inhibitory effect of the stress and on peripheral explanations; they rather focus attention on the complexity of the relations between the two states and on cognitive mechanisms. <br />Now sexual arousal tends to be regarded as a complex response that requires the convergent interpretation of internal and external stimuli. Anxiety may have different effects on this process, sometimes neutral, sometimes facilitating and sometimes inhibitory. <br />On the one hand, anxiety can trigger a vegetative emotional reaction that may be associated to a concomitant erotic stimulation. Thus, anxiety facilitates the sexual response: this can be called a priming effect. This effect is regularly observed in labs, mainly among women. It likely also works in certain compulsive sexual behaviours or, more commonly, in those numerous persons that report being sexually aroused when stressed. <br />On the other hand, anxiety can cause a massive irruption of non erotic cues in working memory. Therefore, cognitive function available for treating erotic stimuli is diminished and sexual response is impaired. This is an effect of cognitive interference. A trait called erotophobia could be regarded as a vulnerability factor to cognitive interference. Erotophobic subjects are characterized by a trend to focus upon danger-related information when they are in a sexual situation and by a higher risk of sexual dysfunction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 179 (9 ULg)