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See detailCell-based description of ventricular contraction in a model of the human cardiovascular system
Kosta, Sarah ULg; Negroni, Jorge; Lascano, Elena et al

Poster (2015, August 31)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (13 ULg)
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See detailCell-Cell and Cell-Matrix Interactions During Breast Cancer Progression
Noël, Agnès ULg; Kebers, F.; Maquoi, Erik ULg et al

in Current Topics in Pathology. Ergebnisse der Pathologie (1999)

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See detailCell-free synthesis of acetylcholine receptor polypeptides
Mendez, B.; Valenzuela, P.; Martial, Joseph ULg et al

in Science (1980), 209(4457), 695-7

Messenger RNA coding for acetylcholine receptor peptides has been identified. This polyadenylate [poly(A)+]RNA from Torpedo californica directs, in a cell-free system, the synthesis of peptides 60,000, 51 ... [more ▼]

Messenger RNA coding for acetylcholine receptor peptides has been identified. This polyadenylate [poly(A)+]RNA from Torpedo californica directs, in a cell-free system, the synthesis of peptides 60,000, 51,000, 49,000 41,000, and 35,000 daltons which account for approximately 2 percent of the total synthesized proteins. The results suggest that several different messenger RNA's code for the receptor subunits. These proteins react specifically to antiserum to native acteylcholine receptor, suggesting that the primary translational product has conformational features similar to the native receptor. Further, the results support the idea that there is post-translational modification of receptor subunits as the molecular weights of the cell-free synthesized proteins differ from those of purified receptor subunits. [less ▲]

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See detailCell-line specific radiosensitizing effect of zalcitabine (DDC)
Coucke, Philippe ULg; Li, Ye-Xiong; Copaceanu, Marie-Laure et al

in Acta Oncologica (1997)

The potential of zalcitabine (ddC) to act as an ionizing radiation response modifier was tested on exponentially growing human cancer cells in vitro. Two human cell lines, WiDr (colon) and MCF-7 (breast ... [more ▼]

The potential of zalcitabine (ddC) to act as an ionizing radiation response modifier was tested on exponentially growing human cancer cells in vitro. Two human cell lines, WiDr (colon) and MCF-7 (breast) were exposed to ddC at 10 p M concentration for various lengths of tide (18, 24, 48 and 72 h). On the WiDr cell line the dual effect of concentration and duration of exposure prior to irradiation was investigated. Experimental endpoints were clonogenicity and viability, as measured by colony formation assay (CFA) and MTT assay respectively. The impact on cell-cycle distribution prior to irradiation was assessed by flow cytometry using a double labeling technique (propidium iodide and bromodeoxyuridine pulse label). A significant reduction in surviving fraction and viability was observed for WiDr-cells irradiated after pre-exposure to 10 pM for 18, 48 and 72 h as compared to corresponding irradiated controls. At lower concentrations (1 and 5 pM), the radiosensitizing effect was only significant after a 72-h exposure (assessed by CFA). For MCF-7, ddC induced a significant modification of the dose response only with 24 and 48 h preincubation. However, the overall effect was less pronounced as compared to WiDr. Cell-cycle analysis showed accumulation in S-phase, 48 and 72 h after treatment with 10 pM ddC in the WiDr cells, with a progressive shift to late S-phase as shown by the biparametric analysis. The degree of radiosensitization is cell-line dependent with the most important sensitization observed on the most <<radioresistant cell line>>, ix., the cell line with the lowest alpha value and highest SF 2 (WiDr). For WiDr, radiosensitization by ddC depends on the duration of exposure and the concentration of the drug. Received 29 February 1996 Accepted 10 December 1996 [less ▲]

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See detailCell-Mediated Immune Response in Calves to Single-Dose, Trickle, and Challenge Infections with Fasciola Hepatica
Bossaert, K.; Jacquinet, E.; Saunders, J. et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2000), 88(1-2), 17-34

A peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation assay was used to study the cell-mediated immune response in eight calves experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica. Hypersensitivity-related ... [more ▼]

A peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation assay was used to study the cell-mediated immune response in eight calves experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica. Hypersensitivity-related eosinophil and mast-cell responses were also assessed. The primary infection of 500 metacercariae was administered either as a single-dose or as a trickle infection over a 4-week period. Calves were challenge-infected 4 months later with 100 metacercariae and slaughtered 24 weeks postprimary infection. Skin eosinophil counts (SEC) were determined prior to infection on the basis of the intradermal reaction (IDR) to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). These counts correlated negatively with the mean fluke length but not with the fluke burden found at necropsy. At the end of the experiment, non-specific (PHA) and specific (excretory-secretory parasite, products, FhESAg, and whole-worm extract, FhSomAg) immediate type hypersensitivity IDR were elicited in contrast to delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. The SEC correlated with blood eosinophilia but not with parasite parameters. These findings suggest that the eosinophil response does not correlate clearly with the development of resistance to F. hepatica infection in cattle. A specific mononuclear cell response to FhSomAg was detectable as early as 7 days after infection in both infected groups, being significantly higher during the very early migratory phase of the juveniles in the single-dose infected calves than in the trickle infected calves. This response remained significantly higher in infected groups than in the control group throughout the experiment. Challenge elicited a significant proliferative response, less pronounced than after primary infection. No production of gamma-interferon (INF-gamma) was recorded 3 weeks after challenge. At necropsy, the mean number of flukes recovered was similar in both infected groups, suggesting that the rate at which the infection is administrated has no effect on protective immunity. Hepatic lesions, similar in both infected groups, were characterised by marked eosinophil and mast-cell infiltration. Liver biopsies were performed and their diagnostic value is discussed. All results suggest that F. hepatica infection predominantly induces a Type-2 response in cattle, and that this response has little protective effect. [less ▲]

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See detailCell-specific interaction of retinoic acid receptors with target genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells.
Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Moutier, Emmanuel; Altobelli, Gioia et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2010), 30(1), 231-44

All-trans retinoic acid (RA) induces transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-dependent autocrine growth of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation to map 354 RA ... [more ▼]

All-trans retinoic acid (RA) induces transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-dependent autocrine growth of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation to map 354 RA receptor (RAR) binding loci in MEFs, most of which were similarly occupied by the RAR alpha and RAR gamma receptors. Only a subset of the genes associated with these loci are regulated by RA, among which are several critical components of the TGF-beta pathway. We also show RAR binding to a novel series of target genes involved in cell cycle regulation, transformation, and metastasis, suggesting new pathways by which RA may regulate proliferation and cancer. Few of the RAR binding loci contained consensus direct-repeat (DR)-type elements. The majority comprised either degenerate DRs or no identifiable DRs but anomalously spaced half sites. Furthermore, we identify 462 RAR target loci in embryonic stem (ES) cells and show that their occupancy is cell type specific. Our results also show that differences in the chromatin landscape regulate the accessibility of a subset of more than 700 identified loci to RARs, thus modulating the repertoire of target genes that can be regulated and the biological effects of RA. [less ▲]

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See detailCell-surface MMP-9 regulates the invasive capacity of leukemia blast cells with monocytic features.
Paupert, Jenny ULg; Mansat-De Mas, Veronique; Demur, Cecile et al

in Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) (2008), 7(8), 1047-53

The metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9), a known mediator of tumour invasion, is secreted as a 92 kDa pro-form but a non-secreted variant of 85 Kda has been described. The importance of this variant pro-form in ... [more ▼]

The metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9), a known mediator of tumour invasion, is secreted as a 92 kDa pro-form but a non-secreted variant of 85 Kda has been described. The importance of this variant pro-form in tumor progression remains poorly defined. We previously showed that the DNA repair protein Ku interacts at the cell surface of leukaemia cell lines with the 85 Kda pro-form of MMP-9 and these Ku/MMP-9 complexes regulates cell invasion, highlighting their importance in haematological malignancies. We demonstrate here that all samples of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts purified from bone marrow of 16 affected patients express the 85 Kda form of MMP-9. However, only AML that display monocytic lineage markers (AML4/5) express this form at the cell surface with co-expression of the membrane associated form of Ku. Blocking antibodies directed against Ku or MMP-9 specifically inhibited cell invasion of those expressing Ku/MMP-9 on the cell surface. The membrane form of Ku might represent an important factor in the exposition to the cell surface of this specific MMP-9 pro-form in AML with monocytic features. These results might have important functional significance in the occurrence of extra-medullar infiltrates of leukaemia cells that occurs frequently during the onset of monocyte-related AML sub-types. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Cellobiose Sensor CebR is the Gatekeeper of Streptomyces scabies Pathogenicity
Francis, Isolde; Jourdan, Samuel ULg; Fanara, Steven ULg et al

in MBio (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (33 ULg)
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See detailThe cellobiose-sensor CebR is the gatekeeper of Streptomyces scabies pathogenicity
Jourdan, Samuel ULg; Francis, Isolde; Loria, Rosemary et al

Poster (2014, October)

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See detailCellular and molecular aspects of the neuroendocrine-immune dialogue in T-cell differentiation
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Robert, Françoise; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Müller, Eugenio E.; MacLeod, Robert (Eds.) Neuroendocrine Perspectives, Volume 8 (1990)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
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See detailCellular and molecular aspects of thymic T-cell education to neuroendocrine self principles: implications in autoimmunity
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Kecha, Ouafae et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (1998), 840

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See detailCellular and molecular aspects of thymic T-cell education to neurohypophysial peptides
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Martens, Henri ULg; Vandersmissen, Eric et al

in Excerpta Medica (1995), 1098

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
See detailCellular and molecular aspects of thymic T-cell education to neurohypophysial peptides
Geenen, Vincent ULg; Vandersmissen, Eric; Martens, Henri ULg et al

in Yoshida, Sho; Saito, Toshikazu; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi (Eds.) Neurohypophysis - Recent Progress of Vasopressin and Oxytocin Research (1995)

Our studies have shown that oxytocin (OT) is the dominant peptide of the neurohypophysial (NHP) family that is expressed by thymic epithelial/nurse cells (TEC/TNC). Both in specific RIA and ICC analyses ... [more ▼]

Our studies have shown that oxytocin (OT) is the dominant peptide of the neurohypophysial (NHP) family that is expressed by thymic epithelial/nurse cells (TEC/TNC). Both in specific RIA and ICC analyses, vasopressin (VP) immunoreactivity is considerably lower in TEC. OT is not secreted by TEC/TNC, but it is presented as the self antigen of the NHP family to developing pre-T cells. The process of T-cell education in recognizing the NHP family involves an active cooperation between this neuroendocrine gene/protein family and the immunoglobulin family. This cooperation is illustrated by the identification in plasma membranes of human TEC of a 55-kDa protein bearing a neurophysin (10 kDa), as well as a MHC class I heavy chain-related domain (45 kDa). Since both OT and VP genes are transcribed in the thymus, the site of this cooperation should be located at posttranscriptional level. From these data, it appears that thymic T-cell education to the NHP family involves specific pathways which are not strictly superimposible to those dlineated using peripheral dedicated APC. Although MHC class I pathways are needed, it appears that thymic T-cell education to NHP self is not restricted in an allelic fashion. This offers significant advantages for the selection of the human T-cell repertoire. Furthermore, the absence of a tight MHC allelic restriction in the process of T-cell education to neuroendocrine self opens novel perpectives for the prevention of autoimmune endocrine disorders such as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 ULg)