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See detailCerebellar macroneurons in microexplant cell culture. Postsynaptic amino acid pharmacology.
Macdonald, R. L.; Moonen, Gustave ULg; Neale, E. A. et al

in Brain Research (1982), 281(1), 75-88

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See detailCerebellar macroneurons in microexplant cell culture: ultrastructural morphology.
NEALE, E. A.; Moonen, Gustave ULg; MACDONALD, R. L. et al

in Neuroscience (1982), 7(8), 1789-90

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
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See detailCerebellar macroneurons in serum-free cultures: evidence for instrinsic neuronotrophic and neuronotoxic activities
Grau-Wagemans, M. P.; SELAK, Ivan ULg; LEFEBVRE, Philippe ULg et al

in Brain Research (1984), 317(1), 11-19

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
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See detailCerebellar macroneurons in serum-free cultures: evidence for intrinsic neuronotrophic and neuronotoxic activities.
Grau-Wagemans, Marie-Paule; SELAK, Ivan ULg; LEFEBVRE, Philippe ULg et al

in Developmental Brain Research (1984)

Cerebellar macroneurones survive and differentiate for at least 10 days in Eagle's minimum essential medium with insulin as the only supplement when cultured either as microexplants or in high-density ... [more ▼]

Cerebellar macroneurones survive and differentiate for at least 10 days in Eagle's minimum essential medium with insulin as the only supplement when cultured either as microexplants or in high-density dissociated cultures, while they do not survive if cultured in low density. The survival is related to the extracellular release of neuronotrophic factor(s). Using a quantitative bioassay of the neuronotrophic effect, it is possible to demonstrate that the effect is concentration dependent. The analysis of the dose-response curves suggests that the neuronotrophic activity is associated with a neuronotoxic activity. The two activities can be segregated using a simple physical method, allowing direct demonstration of the neuronotoxic activity. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebellar metabolite alterations detected in vivo by proton MR spectroscopy
Macri, M. A.; Garreffa, G.; Giove, F. et al

in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2003), 21(10), 1201-1206

The aim of our work was to evaluate the feasibility of in vivo single-voxel quantitative proton MR spectroscopy in order to identify possible alterations in the main metabolite concentrations due to some ... [more ▼]

The aim of our work was to evaluate the feasibility of in vivo single-voxel quantitative proton MR spectroscopy in order to identify possible alterations in the main metabolite concentrations due to some metabolic dysfunctions in the cerebellum of patients suffering from a particular form of migraine called "with aura." Measurements of metabolite levels in the cerebellum disclosed reduced choline values (normalized both to N-acetyl-aspartate and creatine) in the patient group with respect to the age-matched control group. Our interest in this pathology is motivated by the fact that there are no available specific biochemical markers for migraine characterization, and the current diagnostic only takes advantage of the medical history and the clinical examination. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral Activity Associated with Transient Sleep-Facilitated Reduction in Motor Memory Vulnerability to Interference
Albouy, Geneviève; King, Bradley; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6

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See detailCerebral and extracerebral hemodynamics in healthy and sick human neonates
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Armengol, A.; Withofs, L. et al

in Circulation et Métabolisme du Cerveau (1992), 9

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See detailCerebral aspergillosis in immunocompromised patient successfully treated with voriconazole
HUWART, Aline ULg; RADERMACHER, Jean; HENROTEAUX, Adrienne ULg et al

Poster (2012, November 08)

Cerebral aspergillosis is a severe invasive mycosis occurring in immunocompromised patients. This pathology is associated with a high rate of mortality and is a current complication of pulmonary invasive ... [more ▼]

Cerebral aspergillosis is a severe invasive mycosis occurring in immunocompromised patients. This pathology is associated with a high rate of mortality and is a current complication of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis. We report the case of a 44-year-old immunocompromised male with a recent history of oropharyngeal carcinoma. At his admission the patient presented with fever and confusion. Imaging revealed the presence of a cerebral abscess combined with lung infiltrates. During hospitalization and despite a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen his condition worsened. A thin needle aspiration of the abscess was performed for diagnosis purpose. Histological examination of the tissue showed septate and branched hyphae with 45° angles suggestive of Aspergillus. A real-time PCR specific for the detection of Aspergillus sp. was carried out and confirmed the fungal etiology of the abscess. Rare colonies of A. fumigatus were isolated a few days later. The diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis complicated by a cerebral dissemination was confirmed. Antifungal treatment based on voriconazole 4 mg/kg q12h was introduced and the dosage was successfully increased up to 5 mg/kg q12h by drug monitoring. This case highlights the usefulness of the Aspergillus PCR for the rapid identification of hyphae in tissue biopsies (or in the event of negative culture), and the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring in treatment by voriconazole. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral asymmetries in sleep-dependent processes of memory consolidation
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Schmitz, Remy; Willems, Sylvie ULg

in Learning & Memory (2007), 14(6), 400-406

Preference for previously seen, unfamiliar objects reflects a memory bias on affective judgment, known as the "mere exposure effect" (MEE). Here, we investigated the effect of time, post-exposure sleep ... [more ▼]

Preference for previously seen, unfamiliar objects reflects a memory bias on affective judgment, known as the "mere exposure effect" (MEE). Here, we investigated the effect of time, post-exposure sleep, and the brain hemisphere solicited on preference generalization toward objects viewed in different perspectives. When presented in the right visual field (RVF), which promotes preferential processing in the left hemisphere, same and mirrored exemplars were preferred immediately after exposure. MEE generalized to much dissimilar views after three nights of sleep. Conversely, object presentation in the left visual field (LVF), promoting right hemisphere processing, elicited a MEE for same views immediately after exposure, then for mirror views after sleep. Most importantly, sleep deprivation during the first post-exposure night, although followed by two recovery nights, extinguished MEE for all views in the LVF but not in the RVF. Besides demonstrating that post-exposure time and sleep facilitate the generalization process by which we integrate various representations of an object, our results suggest that mostly in the right hemisphere, sleep may be mandatory to consolidate the memory bias underlying affective preference. These interhemispheric differences tentatively call for a reappraisal of the role of cerebral asymmetries in wake- and sleep-dependent processes of memory consolidation. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral blood flow velocities during natural bovine surfactant therapy in very preterm babies
Battisti, Oreste ULg; Detry, J.; Louis, J. et al

in Circulation et Métabolisme du Cerveau (1994), 11

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (8 ULg)
See detailCerebral blood flow velocities in the newborn respiratory disease and surgery
Battisti, Oreste ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1990)

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See detailcerebral blood flow velocities measurements on anterior cerebral artery during general anesthesia and minor surgery
Battisti, Oreste ULg; DE BOE, Xavier ULg; Hubert, P et al

in Circulation et Métabolisme du Cerveau (1994), 11

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See detailCerebral correlates of delta waves during human sleep-wake cycle
Dang-Vu, T.T.; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailCerebral correlates of delta waves during non-REM sleep revisited.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Desseilles, Martin ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 28(1), 14-21

We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of delta activity during Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in non-sleep-deprived normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a positron ... [more ▼]

We aimed at characterizing the neural correlates of delta activity during Non Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in non-sleep-deprived normal young adults, based on the statistical analysis of a positron emission tomography (PET) sleep data set. One hundred fifteen PET scans were obtained using H(2)(15)O under continuous polygraphic monitoring during stages 2-4 of NREM sleep. Correlations between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and delta power (1.5-4 Hz) spectral density were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). Delta power values obtained at central scalp locations negatively correlated during NREM sleep with rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the basal forebrain, the striatum, the anterior insula, and the precuneus. These regions embrace the set of brain areas in which rCBF decreases during slow wave sleep (SWS) as compared to Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep and wakefulness (Maquet, P., Degueldre, C., Delfiore, G., Aerts, J., Peters, J.M., Luxen, A., Franck, G., 1997. Functional neuroanatomy of human slow wave sleep. J. Neurosci. 17, 2807-S2812), supporting the notion that delta activity is a valuable prominent feature of NREM sleep. A strong association was observed between rCBF in the ventromedial prefrontal regions and delta power, in agreement with electrophysiological studies. In contrast to the results of a previous PET study investigating the brain correlates of delta activity (Hofle, N., Paus, T., Reutens, D., Fiset, P., Gotman, J., Evans, A.C., Jones, B.E., 1997. Regional cerebral blood flow changes as a function of delta and spindle activity during slow wave sleep in humans. J. Neurosci. 17, 4800-4808), in which waking scans were mixed with NREM sleep scans, no correlation was found with thalamus activity. This latter result stresses the importance of an extra-thalamic delta rhythm among the synchronous NREM sleep oscillations. Consequently, this rCBF distribution might preferentially reflect a particular modulation of the cellular processes involved in the generation of cortical delta waves during NREM sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral correlates of False Memories after Sleep and Sleep Deprivation
Darsaud, A.; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg et al

Poster (2008, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (3 ULg)
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See detailCerebral correlates of false memories after sleep and sleep deprivation
Darsaud, Annabelle; Dehon, Hedwige; Sterpenich, Virginie ULg et al

Poster (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (1 ULg)
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See detailCerebral correlates of false memories and illusory recollection after sleep and sleep deprivation.
Darsaud, A.; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; et al.

Poster (2008, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
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See detailCerebral correlates of vigilance during night time: Impact of sleep pressure level and inter-individual vulnerability
Maire, Micheline; Reichert, Carolin; Gabel, Virginie et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailCerebral FDG uptake changes with supraorbital transcutaneous electrical stimulation for episodic migraine prevention
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

Conference (2015, May)

Background: A recent multicentre RCT has shown that supraorbital transcutaneous stimulation (STS) targeting branches of the ophtalmic nerve with the Cefaly® device is effective as a preventive therapy for ... [more ▼]

Background: A recent multicentre RCT has shown that supraorbital transcutaneous stimulation (STS) targeting branches of the ophtalmic nerve with the Cefaly® device is effective as a preventive therapy for migraine (Schoenen et al., Neurology 2013). However, the mechanisms of action in the central nervous system remain unknown. Here, we conducted voxel-based analyses of [18]FDG-PET to evaluate metabolic changes immediately after the first STS session and after 3 months of treatment in patients with migraine. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects participated in the experiment: 14 patients with episodic migraine (ICHD3 beta criteria) and 14 age-matched controls. Healthy volunteers underwent only one [18]FDG-PET scan whereas patients were scanned at baseline, directly after a first session of STS and after 3 months of daily treatment. Results: Compliant patients showed a significant decrease in the number of attacks (p = 0.03). When compared to controls, patients (n = 14) at baseline were hypometabolic in the fronto-temporal regions (p < 0.001), especially in the orbitofrontal (OFC) and perigenual anterior cingulate cortex. OFC hypometabolism was not correlated with medication intake. In compliant patients, daily STS for 3 months was followed by a normalization of the fronto-temporal hypometabolism (p< 0.001; OFC: pFWE<0.01). Conclusion: Our study suggests that the OFC is hypoactive in episodic migraine. STS with the Cefaly° device is able to normalize this hypoactivity. This indicates that STS exerts its beneficial effect via slow neuromodulatory mechanisms, as also previously shown for percutaneous occipital nerve stimulation in refractory cluster headache (Magis et al., BMC Neurology 2011). [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral folate deficiency
Ramaekers, Vincent ULg; Blau, Nenad

in Developmental medicine and child neurology (2004), 46(12), 843-51

Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) can be defined as any neurological syndrome associated with low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5MTHF), the active folate metabolite, in the presence ... [more ▼]

Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) can be defined as any neurological syndrome associated with low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5MTHF), the active folate metabolite, in the presence of normal folate metabolism outside the nervous system. CFD could result from either disturbed folate transport or from increased folate turnover within the central nervous system (CNS). We report on a novel neurometabolic syndrome in 20 children, which we term 'idiopathic CFD'. Typical features became manifest from the age of 4 months, starting with marked unrest, irritability, and sleep disturbances followed by psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, spastic paraplegia, and dyskinesia; epilepsy developed in about one third of the children. Most children showed deceleration ofhead growth from the age of 4 to 6 months. Visual disturbances began to develop around the age of 3 years and progressive sensorineural hearing loss started from the age of 6 years. Neuroimaging showed atrophy of frontotemporal regions and periventricular demyelination in seven children, slowly progressive supra- and infratentorial atrophy in three children, and normal findings in the remainder. Because active folate transport to the CNS occurs through receptor-mediated folate receptor protein 1 (FR1) endocytosis, DNA sequencing of the FR1 gene was performed and found to be normal. However, CSF protein analysis revealed a non-functional FR1 protein, suspected to result from either post-translational defects of FR1 protein N-glycosylation, the presence of folate antagonists with irreversible binding, or autoantibodies blocking the folate binding site of FR1. Oral treatment with 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (folinic acid) should be started in low doses at 0.5-1mg/kg/day, but in some patients higher daily doses of folinic acid at 2-3 mg/kg/day are required to normalize CSF 5MTHF values. This proposed treatment protocol resulted in a favourable clinical response in patients identified before the age of six years while partial recovery with poorer outcome was found beyond the age of 6 years. Careful clinical and EEG monitoring should be performed 1, 3, and 6 months after the beginning of treatment. After four to six months of folinic acid treatment, CSF analysis should be repeated in order to prevent over- or under-dosage of folinic acid. Secondary forms of CFD have been recognized during chronic use of antifolate and anticonvulsant drugs and in various known conditions such as Rett syndrome, Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency, dihydropteridine reductase deficiency, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome. The pathogenic link between these underlying specific disease entities and the observed secondary CFD has not been resolved. [less ▲]

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