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See detailChanges in the moss layer after liming in a Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stand of Eastern Belgium
Dulière, J.-F.; De Bruyn, R.; Malaisse, François ULg

in Forest Ecology & Management (2000), 136(1-3), 97-105

The impact of dolomite lime (5 t ha -1) on the moss layer was investigated in a Belgian Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) forest. Bryophytes reacted rapidly, showing a decrease in frequency, cover ... [more ▼]

The impact of dolomite lime (5 t ha -1) on the moss layer was investigated in a Belgian Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) forest. Bryophytes reacted rapidly, showing a decrease in frequency, cover and biomass of acidophilous dominant Dicranaceae species. Some neutrophilous competitive or stress tolerant species were spreading out and some ruderals appeared. The reaction of the dominant species coverage to different liming rates was also considered. Results showed that the negative effect was more pronounced than higher dolomite doses were. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in the PhD Education Policy in Spain: an Institutional Approach
Aliaga Isla, Rocio ULg; Rojas de Franciso, Laura; Lopez, Jordi et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailChanges in the renal and maternal utero-placental arteries in pregnancies complicated by hypertension
Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Hustin, J.; Lambotte, R. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1983), 38(12), 519-36

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See detailChanges in the room-temperature emission spectrum of chlorophyll during fast and slow phases of the Kautsky effect in intact leaves
Franck, Fabrice ULg; Dewez, D.; Popovic, R.

in Photochemistry & Photobiology (2005), 81(2, Mar-Apr), 431-436

Changes in the room-temperature emission spectrum of chlorophyll (Chl) were analyzed using fast diode-array recordings during the Kautsky effect in mature and in greening barley leaves. In mature leaves ... [more ▼]

Changes in the room-temperature emission spectrum of chlorophyll (Chl) were analyzed using fast diode-array recordings during the Kautsky effect in mature and in greening barley leaves. In mature leaves, the comparison of F-O (basal level of fluorescence yield at transient O) and F-M (maximum level of fluorescence yield at transient M) spectra showed that the relative amplitude of total variable fluorescence was maximal for the 684 nm Photosystem II (PSII) band and minimal for the 725 nm Photosystem I band. During the increase from F-O to F-M, a progressive redshift of the spectrum of variable fluorescence occurred. This shift reflected the different fluorescence rise kinetics of different layers of chloroplasts inside the leaf. This was verified by simulating the effect of screening on the emission spectrum of isolated chloroplasts and by experiments on greening leaves with low Chl content. In addition, experiments performed at different greening stages showed that the presence of uncoupled Chl at early-greening stages and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) at later stages have detectable but minor effects on the shape of room-temperature emission spectra. When strong actinic light was applied to mature green leaves, the slow fluorescence yield, which declined from F-M to FT (steady-state level of fluorescence yield at transient T), was accompanied by a slight redshift of the 684 nm PSII band because of nonphotochemical quenching of short-wavelength-emitting Chl ascribed to LHCII. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in the structure and the composition of microtubules within supporting cells of the organ of hearing during development.
Renauld, Justine ULg; Freeman, Stephen ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2016)

The auditory organ is a highly specialized structure composed by specific cellular types. The sensory cells are characterized by stereocilia at their apex and are necessary for the sound perception. These ... [more ▼]

The auditory organ is a highly specialized structure composed by specific cellular types. The sensory cells are characterized by stereocilia at their apex and are necessary for the sound perception. These cells are supported by supporting cells which contain up to 3000 microtubules and are formed by 15protofilaments (15pf) instead of the canonical 13, a unique fact among vertebrates. It was shown that a β-tubulin isoform can specify the microtubule architecture, such as the expression of the Moth β2 in the Drosophila testes imposed the 16pf structure on the corresponding subset of Drosophila microtubules, which normally contain 13pf. To determine the role of these tubulins in the auditory organ and their possible involvement in the formation of the unusual 15pf microtubules of supporting cells, we studied the spatiotemporal localization of five -tubulin isotypes (β1 to 5) as well as acetyl-α-tubulin within the hearing organ during development in rodents. By using confocal microscopy, we showed that with the exception of the β3-tubulin isoform that was specific to nerve fibres, all the different β-tubulin isoforms and acetyl-α-tubulin were mainly present in the supporting cells. Contrary to β1-4-tubulins, we also found that the β5-tubulin isoform appeared only at a key stage of the postnatal development. By using transmission electron microscopy, we examined the fine structure of microtubules at an early and a late postnatal stage. Our TEM study indicated that these cells are composed by 13pf microtubules at P2, but by 15pf microtubules at P25. We revealed further that this developmental stage coincide with the formation of two separate bundles of microtubules from a unique one in these supporting cells. In conclusion, the architecture and composition of microtubules present in the supporting cells change during development of the organ of Corti. Further experiments are now required to determine if these changes are related to the appearance of β5-tubulin. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in the structure and the symptoms of the osteoarthritis knee and prediction of future knee replacement over an 8-year follow-up period
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Pavelka, Karel et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013, April), 24(Suppl.1), 209

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See detailChanges in the transcriptional profile in response to overexpression of the osteopontin-c splice isoform in ovarian (OvCar-3) and prostate (PC-3) cancer cell lines.
Tilli, Tatiana M.; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

in BMC cancer (2014), 14

BACKGROUND: Especially in human tumor cells, the osteopontin (OPN) primary transcript is subject to alternative splicing, generating three isoforms termed OPNa, OPNb and OPNc. We previously demonstrated ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Especially in human tumor cells, the osteopontin (OPN) primary transcript is subject to alternative splicing, generating three isoforms termed OPNa, OPNb and OPNc. We previously demonstrated that the OPNc splice variant activates several aspects of the progression of ovarian and prostate cancers. The goal of the present study was to develop cell line models to determine the impact of OPNc overexpression on main cancer signaling pathways and thus obtain insights into the mechanisms of OPNc pro-tumorigenic roles. METHODS: Human ovarian and prostate cancer cell lines, OvCar-3 and PC-3 cells, respectively, were stably transfected to overexpress OPNc. Transcriptomic profiling was performed on these cells and compared to controls, to identify OPNc overexpression-dependent changes in gene expression levels and pathways by qRT-PCR analyses. RESULTS: Among 84 genes tested by using a multiplex real-time PCR Cancer Pathway Array approach, 34 and 16, respectively, were differentially expressed between OvCar-3 and PC-3 OPNc-overexpressing cells in relation to control clones. Differentially expressed genes are included in all main hallmarks of cancer, and several interacting proteins have been identified using an interactome network analysis. Based on marked up-regulation of Vegfa transcript in response to OPNc overexpression, we partially validated the array data by demonstrating that conditioned medium (CM) secreted from OvCar-3 and PC-3 OPNc-overexpressing cells significantly induced endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation and migration, compared to CM secreted from control cells. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the present study elucidated transcriptional changes of OvCar-3 and PC-3 cancer cell lines in response to OPNc overexpression, which provides an assessment for predicting the molecular mechanisms by which this splice variant promotes tumor progression features. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in the Western Boundary Undercurrent outflow since the Last Glacial Maximum, from smectite/illite ratios in deep Labrador Sea sediments
Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Hillaire-Marcel; Robert, Christian

in Paleoceanography (1997), 12(1), 79-96

High-resolution mineralogical studies were performed on late glacial and deglacial sediments from two deep piston cores from the Labrador Sea, located at the inlet (SW Greenland Rise) and outlet (Labrador ... [more ▼]

High-resolution mineralogical studies were performed on late glacial and deglacial sediments from two deep piston cores from the Labrador Sea, located at the inlet (SW Greenland Rise) and outlet (Labrador Rise) of the Western Boundary Undercurrent (WBUC) gyre. At the two sites, smectites transported from the eastern Iceland and Irminger basins by the WBUC are observed. Clay mineral changes are used as proxies for the paleointensity reconstruction of the WBUC. On the Greenland Rise, a clay mineral index (smectite/illite (S/I) ratio) is defined. A S/I ratio of similar to 1 characterized the Last Glacial Maximum. It increased after similar to 17 ka, and reached a maximum value of 4 during the early Holocene, The mineralogical changes are gradual and do not show any reversal during the Younger Dryas, This pattern, which is confirmed by first-order estimations of smectite and illite fluxes, suggests gradually increasing sedimentary fluxes and WBUC intensity since the Last Glacial Maximum, A peak in the velocity of the WBUC at similar to 9 ka, as recorded by clay assemblages, is consistent with other regional studies based on pollen, foraminifera, or grain-size measurements, A massive dilution of smectites by illite and chlorite (S/I approximate to 3) occurs at similar to 8.5 ka. It corresponds to a period of rapid sediment accumulation and reflects an intensified illite-rich detrital supply by meltwaters from the southern Greenland Ice Margin. On the Labrador Rise, the smectite content varies between 20 and 60% with no obvious trend through time. The mineralogical composition is strongly influenced by ice-rafted deposition and by the abundance of fast deposit units (cf, Heinrich layers in the North Atlantic) which contain abundant detrital carbonates spilled-over from the North-West Atlantic Mid-Ocean Channel. In such layers, smectites are present but are diluted by the addition of illites, chlorites, and kaolinites. This provides evidence for a discrete and continuous WBUC supply of fine particles from the Irminger and Iceland Basins as far as the southeastern part of the Labrador Basin, Early deglacial smectite-rich layers (up to 60%) are also observed at this site, They indicate an increase in the outflow of the WBUC at similar to 13.5 ka, (Bolling-Allerod), as previously reported from grain size or foraminiferal assemblage studies. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in trace elements during lactation in a marine top predator, the grey seal
Habran, Sarah ULg; Pomeroy, P; Debier, C et al

in Aquatic Toxicology (2013), 126

Lactation in pinnipeds represents the most significant cost to mothers during the reproductive cycle. Dynamics of trace elements and their mobilization associated with energy reserves during such an ... [more ▼]

Lactation in pinnipeds represents the most significant cost to mothers during the reproductive cycle. Dynamics of trace elements and their mobilization associated with energy reserves during such an intense physiological process remains poorly understood in marine mammals. The changes in tissue concentrations of 11 elements (Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, V, and Zn) were investigated in a longitudinal study during the lactation period and during the post-weaning fast period. Blood, milk, blubber, and hair samples were collected sequentially from 21 mother-pup pairs of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the Isle of May in Scotland. Maternal transfer through the milk was observed for all trace elements, except for Cd. As an indicator of the placental transfer, levels in pup lanugo (natal coat) revealed also the existence of maternal transfer and accumulation of all assayed trace elements during the foetal development. The placental and mammary barriers against non-essential metal transfer to offspring appear to be absent or weak in grey seals. Examining the contamination levels showed that this grey seal population seems more highly exposed to Pb than other phocid populations (2.2 mg/kg dw of grey seal hair). In contrast, blood and hair levels reflected a lower Hg exposure in grey seals from the Isle of May than in harbour seals from the southeastern North Sea. This study also showed that trace element concentrations in blood and blubber could change rapidly over the lactation period. Such physiological processes must be considered carefully during biomonitoring of trace elements, and potential impacts that rapid fluctuations in concentrations can exert on seal health should be further investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in Travel Behavior in Response to Weather Conditions: Do Type of Weather and Trip Purpose Matter
Cools, Mario ULg; Moons, Elke; Creemers, Lieve et al

in Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board (2010), 2157

Weather can influence travel demand, traffic flow, and traffic safety. A hypothesis—the type of weather determined the likelihood of a change in travel behavior, and changes in travel behavior because of ... [more ▼]

Weather can influence travel demand, traffic flow, and traffic safety. A hypothesis—the type of weather determined the likelihood of a change in travel behavior, and changes in travel behavior because of weather conditions depended on trip purpose—was assayed. A stated adaptation study was conducted in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium). A survey, completed by 586 respondents, was administered both on the Internet and as a traditional paper-and-pencil questionnaire. To ensure optimal correspondence between the survey sample composition and the Flemish population, observations in the sample were weighted. To test the main hypotheses, Pearson chi-square independence tests were performed. Results from both the descriptive analysis and the independence tests confirm that the type of weather matters and that changes in travel behavior in response to these weather conditions are highly dependent on trip purpose. This dependence of behavioral adjustments on trip purpose provides policy makers with a deeper understanding of how weather conditions affect traffic. Further generalizations of the findings are possible by shifting the scope toward revealed travel behavior. Triangulation of both stated and revealed travel behavior on the one hand and traffic intensities on the other hand is a key challenge for further research. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in Travel Behavior in Response to Weather Conditions: Do Type of Weather and Trip Purpose Matter
Cools, Mario ULg; Moons, Elke; Creemers, Lieve et al

in Proceedings of the 89th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (DVD-ROM) (2010)

Weather events can affect traffic in various ways; it can influence travel demand, traffic flows and traffic safety. This paper focuses on the impact of weather conditions on travel demand. The main ... [more ▼]

Weather events can affect traffic in various ways; it can influence travel demand, traffic flows and traffic safety. This paper focuses on the impact of weather conditions on travel demand. The main objectives of this paper are to test the hypothesis that the type of weather determines the likelihood of a change in travel behavior and to assay whether the changes in travel behavior due to weather conditions are dependent on the trip purpose. To this end, a stated adaptation study was conducted in Flanders (Dutch speaking region of Belgium). In total 586 respondents completed the survey, which was administered both on the Internet and via a traditional paper and-pencil questionnaire. To ensure an optimal correspondence between the survey sample composition and the Flemish population, the observations in the sample are weighted. To test the main hypotheses Pearson chi-square independence tests will be performed. Both the results from the descriptive analysis and the independence tests confirm that the type of weather matters, and that the changes in travel behavior in response to these weather conditions are highly dependent on the trip purpose. This dependence of behavioral adjustments on trip purposes provides policy makers with a deeper understanding of how weather conditions affect traffic. Further generalizations of the findings are possible by shifting the scope towards revealed travel behavior. Triangulation of both stated and revealed travel behavior on the one hand, and traffic intensities on the other hand, is certainly a key challenge for further research. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in visual-evoked potential habituation induced by hyperventilation in migraine.
Coppola, G.; Curra, A.; Sava, Simona ULg et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2010)

Hyperventilation is often associated with stress, an established trigger factor for migraine. Between attacks, migraine is associated with a deficit in habituation to visual-evoked potentials (VEP) that ... [more ▼]

Hyperventilation is often associated with stress, an established trigger factor for migraine. Between attacks, migraine is associated with a deficit in habituation to visual-evoked potentials (VEP) that worsens just before the attack. Hyperventilation slows electroencephalographic (EEG) activity and decreases the functional response in the occipital cortex during visual stimulation. The neural mechanisms underlying deficient-evoked potential habituation in migraineurs remain unclear. To find out whether hyperventilation alters VEP habituation, we recorded VEPs before and after experimentally induced hyperventilation lasting 3 min in 18 healthy subjects and 18 migraine patients between attacks. We measured VEP P100 amplitudes in six sequential blocks of 100 sweeps and habituation as the change in amplitude over the six blocks. In healthy subjects, hyperventilation decreased VEP amplitude in block 1 and abolished the normal VEP habituation. In migraine patients, hyperventilation further decreased the already low block 1 amplitude and worsened the interictal habituation deficit. Hyperventilation worsens the habituation deficit in migraineurs possibly by increasing dysrhythmia in the brainstem-thalamo-cortical network. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges of chlorophyll(ide) fluorescence yield induced by a short light pulse as a probe to monitor the early steps of etioplast phototransformation in dark-grown leaves
Eullaffroy, P.; Popovic, R.; Franck, Fabrice ULg

in Photochemistry & Photobiology (1998), 67(6), 676-682

The fluorescence yield of chlorophyll(ide) (ChI[ide]) excited by weak modulated light was recorded at room temperature during a 2 h period after a short actinic light pulse that transformed all ... [more ▼]

The fluorescence yield of chlorophyll(ide) (ChI[ide]) excited by weak modulated light was recorded at room temperature during a 2 h period after a short actinic light pulse that transformed all photoactive protochlorophyllide in dark-grown barley leaves. A typical pattern of fluorescence yield variations was found whatever the age of the leaf but with age-dependent changes in rates. Its successive phases were related to the Chl(ide) spectral shifts observed in low-temperature emission spectra. The fluorescence yield started at a high level and strongly declined during the formation of Chlide(695) from Chlide(688) within a few seconds. It increased to a transient maximum during the Shibata shift (15-25 min) that resulted in ChI(ide)(682). A final, slow decrease to a steady state occurred during the final red shift to ChI(685). Pretreatments with delta-aminolevulinic acid, chloramphenicol or 1,10-phenanthroline resulted in correlated modifications of Chl(ide) fluorescence yield transients and shifts of the low-temperature Chl(ide) emission band. The complex response of the final decrease phase of the fluorescence yield to these compounds suggests that it results both from the assembly of photosynthetic Chi proteins and from the reorganization of the etioplast membrane system. From these results it is concluded that continuous recordings of CN(ide) fluorescence yield after a short light pulse represent a useful tool to monitor the kinetics of pigment-protein organization and primary thylakoid assembly triggered by Pchlide photoreduction. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges of macrofauna stable isotope compositions in a very inconstant seagrass detritic habitat: actual diet modification or baseline shift?
Remy, François ULg; Mascart, Thibaud ULg; Dauby, Patrick ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 20)

Decayed leaves of the Neptune grass Posidonia oceanica, detached and then exported during storms, constitute an important compartment in terms of organic matter transfer from the seagrass bed to the other ... [more ▼]

Decayed leaves of the Neptune grass Posidonia oceanica, detached and then exported during storms, constitute an important compartment in terms of organic matter transfer from the seagrass bed to the other habitats, particularly coastal habitats. These exported litter accumulations (ELA) support a diverse (more than 130 species) and abundant (up to 4900 id.m-2) vagile macrofauna (invertebrates > 500µm) assemblage which may play a key role in the degradation, enrichment and carbon transfer from P. oceanica dead material to coastal food chains. Indeed, preliminary results of vagile invertebrates gut content observations show that even if only a few of these species ingest a large proportion of P.oceanica dead leaves fragments, most of the others ingest a small but non-negligible part, suggesting a potential role of the whole community in the mechanical fragmentation of the dead leaves. ELA are very dynamic habitats with highly variable food availability, quality, and composition. Such an inconstant habitat may result in drastic modifications of the invertebrate community but also of its trophic structure and ecology. To test this hypothesis of influence of pulsed availability, quality and composition of food sources on the vagile macrofauna diet, we took seasonal samples in Calvi Bay (Corsica, 8°45’E; 42°35’N), at two sites between August 2011 and May 2012. Stable isotopes analysis (C&N) were conducted at an individual level on dominant macrofauna species and mixing and isotopic niche model packages in R were used. Bayesian inference “SIBER” package highlighted significant seasonal and spatial differences of diet at the community, specific and even intraspecific level. Data confirm the potential transfer of seagrass material to animal tissues but in various proportions depending of the species and the season. But one question remained: are these variations reflection a true diet change, or only a spatiotemporal baseline variation of the food sources isotopic composition? “SIAR” Bayesian mixing model showed that it depends on the species and that the two responses co-occur. We emphasized the need to work at the specific level but also with an adequate temporal resolution for sampling to encompass diet and baseline variability. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges of soil structure and earthworm community under different agricultural management
Lemtiri, Aboulkacem ULg; Alabi, Taofic; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

Conference (2013, April 11)

The living soil is represented by soil biota that interacts with aboveground biota and with the abiotic constructs of soil, represented as soil structure, organic matter, and nutrients. Maintenance of ... [more ▼]

The living soil is represented by soil biota that interacts with aboveground biota and with the abiotic constructs of soil, represented as soil structure, organic matter, and nutrients. Maintenance of soil organic matter through integrated soil fertility management is necessary for soil quality and agricultural productivity. Earthworms are key actors in soil structure formation through the formation of casts and the incorporation of soil organic matter in the soil. Little is known about the interactive effects of various tillage and crop residue management practices on earthworm populations and physical properties of soil. <br />To investigate the impacts of two tillage management systems and two cropping systems on earthworms populations and soil stucture dynamics, we carried out a three years study of the earthworm communities in experimental site having for experimental treatments : two tillage management systems and two cropping systems. In consequence, the aims of this experimentation were to determine the effects of the tillage systems on the abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms and examine temporal variation of soil structure and dynamics of nutrient elements. <br />The first results reveal that tillage management had a significant affect on earthworm abundance and biomass. However, crop residue management did not affect abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms. The analyze of nutrient element dynamics showed that some nutrient elements (phosphore,…) decrease with tillage practice. This study has shown that soil structure was variable within the fields and between them, although the successive cultivation operations and the equipement used for wheat cropping were identical in the study site. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges of sub-fossil chironomid assemblages associated with volcanic sediment deposition in an Andean lake (38 degrees S), Chile
Araneda, Alberto; Cruces, Fabiola; Torres, Laura et al

in Revista Chilena de Historia Natural (2007), 80(2), 141-156

Chironomid assemblages and sedimentological parameters (grain size, organic content, mineralogy) of a short sediment core from Lake Galletue (38 degrees 41' S, 71 degrees 17' W) were analysed. The ... [more ▼]

Chironomid assemblages and sedimentological parameters (grain size, organic content, mineralogy) of a short sediment core from Lake Galletue (38 degrees 41' S, 71 degrees 17' W) were analysed. The sedimentary record includes one volcanic ash (tephra) layer, which has a completely different composition than the host sediment in terms of organic content, grain size, and mineralogy. According to the geochronology (Pb-210 and Cs-137), this ash layer corresponds to the eruption of Llaima Volcano in 1956-1957. The tephra deposition had an impact on chironomid assemblages producing, among other changes, an increase in Parakiefferiella and a decrease in Ablabesmyia, although no noticeable change was detected in the diversity index. When compared with other studies, our results also show an impact in terms of the presence of chironomid head capsules within the tephra. The presence of these head capsules could result from the effects of percolation, since the coarse grain size of the tephra particles provides large interstitial spaces. The recovery in the abundances of some taxa after the tephra input, suggests the lake is probably restoring the conditions prevailing before the tephra fall. [less ▲]

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See detailChanging Architecture's materiality and meaning through digital culture
Delvaux, Frederic ULg; Bianchi, Romuald ULg; Defawes, Georges ULg et al

in Proceedings of the international conference Changing cities : spatial, morphological, formal and socio-economic dimensions (2013)

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See detailChanging Belgian Mental Healthcare Delivery - Enacting Policy Learning
Thunus, Sophie ULg; Schoenaers, Frédéric ULg

Conference (2015, July)

Based on sociological analyses of Belgian mental healthcare reforms, this paper demonstrates how policy learning occurs in that field –through the process of devising policy change – and how it impacts on ... [more ▼]

Based on sociological analyses of Belgian mental healthcare reforms, this paper demonstrates how policy learning occurs in that field –through the process of devising policy change – and how it impacts on policy change, such as mediated through collective action and social interactions taking place in relation to policy change. It first defines coalitions of actors, institutional power struggles and conflicts of paradigms representing barriers and opportunities for policy change. Then, by using the phenomenology of Embodied, Inscribed and Enacted Knowledge in Policy (Freeman & Sturdy, 2014), it identifies policy learning resulting from the process of preparing and devising the ongoing “Reform 107”. By providing means to attend to the transformation of policy-relevant knowledge through social interactions, the phenomenology enabled us to identify three ways of learning (by assembling, meeting and anticipating), which are associated to three types of changes in mental health policies (negotiated change, innovation and strategic change). [less ▲]

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See detailChanging concepts in plant hormone action
Gaspar, Thomas ULg; Kevers, Claire ULg; Faivre-Rampant, Odile et al

in In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology-Plant (2003), 39(2, MAR-APR), 85-106

A plant hormone is not, in the classic animal sense, a chemical synthesized in one organ, transported to a second organ to exert a chemical action to control a physiological event. Any phytohormone can be ... [more ▼]

A plant hormone is not, in the classic animal sense, a chemical synthesized in one organ, transported to a second organ to exert a chemical action to control a physiological event. Any phytohormone can be synthesized everywhere and can influence different growth and development processes at different places. The concept of physiological activity under hormonal control cannot be dissociated from changes in concentrations at the site of action, from spatial differences and changes in the tissue's sensitivity to the compound, from its transport and its metabolism, from balances and interactions with the other phytohormones, or in their metabolic relationships, and in their signaling pathways as well. Secondary messengers are also involved. Hormonal involvement in physiological processes can appear through several distinct manifestations (as environmental sensors, homeostatic regulators and spatio-temporal synchronizers, resource allocators, biotime adjusters, etc.), dependent on or integrated with the primary biochemical pathways. The time has also passed for the hypothesized 'specific' developmental hormones, rhizocaline, caulocaline, and florigen: root, stem, and flower formation result from a sequential control of specific events at the right places through a coordinated control by electrical signals, the known phytohormones and nonspecific molecules of primary and secondary metabolism, and involve both cytoplasmic and apoplastic compartments. These contemporary views are examined in this review. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (4 ULg)