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See detailCharacterization of dried banana porous structure by X-ray microtomography coupled with image analysis
Léonard, Angélique ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg; Devahastin, Sakamon

in Chen, Guohua (Ed.) The proceedings of the 5th Asia-Pacific Drying Conference, Hong Kong, 13 – 15 August 2007, Vol. 1 (2007)

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See detailCharacterization of dry and wet sawdust porous beds
Parmentier, Nicolas; Plougonven, Erwan ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg et al

in Powder Technology (2014), 264

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See detailCharacterization of Duplex steel Uranus 76N during deformation and heat treatment
Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline ULg; Moureaux, P.; Carton, Marc ULg et al

in Physica Status Solidi A. Applications and Materials Science (2006), 203(15), 3651-3664

Duplex Uranus 76N is characterized by metallography, thermal and mechanical analysis. The investigation shows that the microstructure of such a Duplex strongly depends on the cooling conditions ... [more ▼]

Duplex Uranus 76N is characterized by metallography, thermal and mechanical analysis. The investigation shows that the microstructure of such a Duplex strongly depends on the cooling conditions determining the quantity of austenite formed in the ferrite matrix. Numerical simulations of 76N behavior during the rolling process and service life require the knowledge of the recrystallization state during rolling steps at high temperature, thermal parameters such as dilatation, density, specific heat, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and mechanical constitutive laws. These material parameters are determined and presented in this study. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of embryos derived from calf oocytes: kinetics of cleavage, cell allocation to inner cell mass, and trophectoderm and lipid metabolism.
Majerus, V.; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie ULg; Ferguson, E. M. et al

in Molecular Reproduction and Development (2000), 57(4), 346-52

Embryos derived from calf oocytes were compared with adult cow oocyte-derived embryos (1) by studying the kinetics of embryo development using time-lapse cinematography (2) by evaluating the ratio between ... [more ▼]

Embryos derived from calf oocytes were compared with adult cow oocyte-derived embryos (1) by studying the kinetics of embryo development using time-lapse cinematography (2) by evaluating the ratio between inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) cells in blastocysts (3) by measuring the triglyceride content of the blastocysts. The rate of calf oocyte-derived embryos reaching the blastocyst stage was reduced (26 vs. 46% for adult derived embryos). Calf oocyte-derived embryos preferably arrested their development before the 9-cell stage. Those that developed into blastocysts had cleaved earlier to reach the 2-cell or 3-cell stages than embryos that arrested before the 9-cell stage. The 9-cell stage tended to appear later in calf oocyte-derived embryo that reached the blastocyst stage than in adult-derived embryos. This difference became significant at the morula stage. Accordingly, the fourth cell cycle duration was longer for calf oocyte-derived embryos. Day 8 blastocysts from both sources had similar total cell numbers (calf: 89 +/- 20; cow: 100 +/- 30) and cell distribution between TE and ICM. The triglyceride content of day 7 blastocysts was similar for both sources (64 +/- 15 vs. 65 +/- 6 ng/embryo, respectively). In conclusion, calf oocyte-derived embryos are characterized by a higher rate of developmental arrest before the 9-cell stage and by a longer lag phase preceding the major onset of embryonic genome expression. These changes might be related to insufficient "capacitation" of the calf oocyte during follicular growth. Despite these differences, modifications in the quality of the resulting blastocysts were not detected. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of fatty acids camel meat in Algeria
Sahraoui, Naima; Dotreppe, Olivier; Errahmani, M. B. et al

in Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique (2014), 49(15), 231-234

The fatty acids of camel meat were characterized by 54.6% of saturated fatty acids (SFA), 35.0% of mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MFA) and 10.4% of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The polyunsaturated ... [more ▼]

The fatty acids of camel meat were characterized by 54.6% of saturated fatty acids (SFA), 35.0% of mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MFA) and 10.4% of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The polyunsaturated/saturated ratio was found equal to 0.25, that of ω6/ω3 equal to 4.1. The comparison by age showed no significant effect on the contents of FA, SFA, MFA, PUFA, ω6 and ω3 (P > 0.05). The comparison by gender and race has revealed highly significant effectsalmost on all studied parameters. Thus, the contents of the FA, SFA, MFA, PUFA, ω6 and ω3 werefound significantly higher in the Sahrawi males (P < 0.05). The females, Sahrawi as well as Tergui, have exhibited PUFA/SFA and ω6/ω3 ratios significantly higher than males (P < 0.05), but alsorelatively low levels of lipids and ω6/ω3 ratios deemed favorable. These results suggest betteroverall nutritional characteristics, essentially in females, and the importance of promoting thismeat for products of particular nutritional characters. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of fine aggregates in concrete by different experimental approaches
He, Huan; Courard, Luc ULg; Pirard, Eric ULg et al

in Proceedings 13 Int. Congress for Stereology (2011, October)

Being its major component, aggregate can occupy up to three-quarter of the volume of concrete. The structure of aggregate formed in hardened state impacts largely on mechanical and durability properties ... [more ▼]

Being its major component, aggregate can occupy up to three-quarter of the volume of concrete. The structure of aggregate formed in hardened state impacts largely on mechanical and durability properties of concrete. On another hand, physical characteristics of aggregate are primarily assumed to be relevant to granular behavior of aggregate. Therefore, characterization of aggregate is of high relevance to concrete studies. In this study, different types of fine aggregate used in concrete, namely river sand and crushed limestone, are selected for morphological characterization. Traditional sieve analysis and laser diffraction method are employed for separation and size analysis of specimens. Different types of fine aggregate samples with comparable size ranges are then analyzed by two advanced dry (static) and wet (dynamic) image analysers. These new analysers are especially suitable for characterization of fine particles, which is difficult by traditional image analysis equipments. Size and shape characteristics of different fine aggregates will be revealed by different experimental methods. The results on different parameters for shape characterization will be compared and discussed [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of fine aggregates in concrete by different experimental approaches
He, Huan ULg; Courard, Luc ULg; Pirard, Eric ULg et al

in Proceedings 13 Int. Congress for Stereology (2011, October)

Being its major component, aggregate can occupy up to three-quarter of the volume of concrete. The structure of aggregate formed in hardened state impacts largely on mechanical and durability properties ... [more ▼]

Being its major component, aggregate can occupy up to three-quarter of the volume of concrete. The structure of aggregate formed in hardened state impacts largely on mechanical and durability properties of concrete. On another hand, physical characteristics of aggregate are primarily assumed to be relevant to granular behavior of aggregate. Therefore, characterization of aggregate is of high relevance to concrete studies. In this study, different types of fine aggregate used in concrete, namely river sand and crushed limestone, are selected for morphological characterization. Traditional sieve analysis and laser diffraction method are employed for separation and size analysis of specimens. Different types of fine aggregate samples with comparable size ranges are then analyzed by two advanced dry (static) and wet (dynamic) image analysers. These new analysers are especially suitable for characterization of fine particles, which is difficult by traditional image analysis equipments. Size and shape characteristics of different fine aggregates will be revealed by different experimental methods. The results on different parameters for shape characterization will be compared and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of FRD3, a iron and zinc homeostasis actor in Arabidopsis relatives
Scheepers, Maxime ULg; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Spielmann, Julien ULg et al

Poster (2016, June 09)

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See detailCharacterization of FRD3, a zinc and iron homeostasis actor in Arabidopsis relatives
Scheepers, Maxime ULg; Charlier, Jean Benoit; Spielmann, Julien ULg et al

Conference (2016, July 14)

Zinc and iron are two essential micronutrients for plants. The homeostasis networks of the two metals are intertwined. Arabidopsis halleri is a zinc- and cadmium-tolerant and zinc-hyperaccumulating ... [more ▼]

Zinc and iron are two essential micronutrients for plants. The homeostasis networks of the two metals are intertwined. Arabidopsis halleri is a zinc- and cadmium-tolerant and zinc-hyperaccumulating species, which also present adaptation of its iron homeostasis(1,4). Transcriptomic studies identified genes which are constitu-tively over-expressed in Arabidopsis halleri compared to Arabidopsis thaliana and which may have a role in metal tolerance or accumulation(2-4). Among them, a candidate gene encodes the FRD3 (FERRIC REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) protein, a member of the MATE family of membrane transporters. FRD3 is a citrate transporter involved in iron homeostasis(5-7) and plays a role in zinc tolerance in A. thaliana(8). The FRD3 gene displays a complex regulation. In A. thaliana, alternative transcript initiation for FRD3 determines two transcripts, which dif-fer in their 5'UTRs and have differential translation efficiency. The two transcripts are selectively regulated under stress conditions: iron and zinc depletion, zinc excess or cadmium presence(9). In A. halleri, a single highly ex-pressed FRD3 transcript with high translation efficiency is present(9). We are further examining the FRD3 function in zinc and iron homeostasis in A. thaliana and A. halleri. We will present data (i) on the high expression of FRD3 in A. halleri, (ii) on the functional characterization of the two alternative FRD3 transcripts and their role in metal homeostasis in A. thaliana in comparison with the A. halleri FRD3 transcript and (iii) on the zinc phenotypes of the frd3 A. thaliana mutant. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of FRD3, a zinc and iron homeostasis actor, in Arabidopsis
Scheepers, Maxime ULg; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Spielmann, Julien ULg et al

Poster (2016, May 13)

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See detailCharacterization Of Functional Residues In The Interfacial Recognition Domain Of Lecithin Cholesterol Acyltransferase (Lcat)
Peelman, F.; Vanloo, B.; Perez-Mendez, O. et al

in Protein Engineering (1999), 12(1), 71-8

Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is an interfacial enzyme active on both high-density (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Threading alignments of LCAT with lipases suggest that residues ... [more ▼]

Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is an interfacial enzyme active on both high-density (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Threading alignments of LCAT with lipases suggest that residues 50-74 form an interfacial recognition site and this hypothesis was tested by site-directed mutagenesis. The (delta56-68) deletion mutant had no activity on any substrate. Substitution of W61 with F, Y, L or G suggested that an aromatic residue is required for full enzymatic activity. The activity of the W61F and W61Y mutants was retained on HDL but decreased on LDL, possibly owing to impaired accessibility to the LDL lipid substrate. The decreased activity of the single R52A and K53A mutants on HDL and LDL and the severer effect of the double mutation suggested that these conserved residues contribute to the folding of the LCAT lid. The membrane-destabilizing properties of the LCAT 56-68 helical segment were demonstrated using the corresponding synthetic peptide. An M65N-N66M substitution decreased both the fusogenic properties of the peptide and the activity of the mutant enzyme on all substrates. These results suggest that the putative interfacial recognition domain of LCAT plays an important role in regulating the interaction of the enzyme with its organized lipoprotein substrates. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of gas transport in low-permeability media: two-phase flow analysis of an in-situ experiment
Gerard, Pierre; Radu, Jean-Pol ULg; de la Vaissière, Rémi et al

in POROMECHANICS V: Proceedings of the Fifth Biot Conference on Poromechanics (2013)

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See detailCharacterization of gels via solvent desorption measurements
Gommes, Cédric ULg; Noville, Francis ULg; Pirard, Jean-Paul ULg

in Adsorption (2007), 13(5-6), 533-540

The present paper shows how a standard volumetric adsorption device can be used to measure solvent desorption isotherms on gels. As gels are very soft materials, they shrink significantly during the ... [more ▼]

The present paper shows how a standard volumetric adsorption device can be used to measure solvent desorption isotherms on gels. As gels are very soft materials, they shrink significantly during the measurement, and the data have to be analyzed in terms of the mechanical properties of the gel's skeleton. Methanol desorption isotherms are measured on a series of silica gels, and the results are compared with independent characterizations, notably beam bending. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of gels via solvent desorption measurements
Gommes, Cédric ULg; Noville, Francis; Pirard, Jean-Paul ULg

Poster (2007, May)

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See detailCharacterization of GPR101 transcripts structure and expression patterns
Trivellin, Giampaolo; Ivana, Bjelobaba; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in Journal of Molecular Endocrinology (2016)

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See detailCharacterization of GPR101 transcripts structure, expression and signaling
Trivellin, G; Bjelobaba, I; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in Abstract book - Keystone Symposia on GPCRs (2016, February)

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See detailCharacterization of growth hormone-binding protein in cattle plasma: prolactin-binding activity and 24-hour profile.
Massart, S.; Ban, A. M.; Renaville, Robert ULg et al

in Domestic Animal Endocrinology (1996), 13(1), 47-57

The purpose of this study was to characterize circulating growth hormone-binding proteins (GHBP) and prolactin-binding proteins (PRLBP) in cattle blood plasma. In particular, the 24-hr profile of these ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to characterize circulating growth hormone-binding proteins (GHBP) and prolactin-binding proteins (PRLBP) in cattle blood plasma. In particular, the 24-hr profile of these molecules was investigated. The preincubation of bull plasma with iodinated bovine growth hormone (bGH) or bovine prolactin (bPRL), followed by gel filtration chromatography (Superdex 200; 1.6 x 60 cm column), resulted in the formation of essentially two complexes. The majority of [125I]bPRL eluted with the first one (M(r) approximately 600 kDa), whereas [125I]bGH mainly appeared in the second one (M(r) approximately 70 kDa). The fractions corresponding to these two peaks were analyzed by western ligand blotting (WLB), under reducing conditions. WLB revealed, respectively, 190-, 56-, 52-, and 28-kDa bands for the first peak and only 52- and 28-kDa bands for the second one. The nature of the 600-kDa peak is at present undetermined, but the 70-kDa one was previously identified as high-affinity GHBP. Displacement studies demonstrated that bGH and bPRL were both able to bind to this GHBP, because the bGH- and bPRL-binding activities of this protein could be saturated by an excess of either of these two hormones. This was indirectly confirmed by the close correlation (r = 0.615; P = 0.0001; n = 155) observed between plasma bGH- and bPRL-binding activities, because this correlation could suggest that both ligands are bound to the same proteins. The temporal concentrations of plasma GHBP were measured in samples collected at 20-min intervals for 24 hr from 8 young bulls. The evaluation of GHBP was realized by WLB, followed by densitometric analysis. Some fluctuations were observed, but these were not correlated with bGH release, even with a +/- 2-hr lag period. In summary, we found that bovine high-affinity GHBP binds not only bGH, but also bPRL. A second type of protein, of higher molecular weight, also binds these two hormones, but further investigations are needed to determine its nature. Finally, GHBP concentrations in cattle blood plasma apparently show fluctuations over a 24-hr period, but no correlation was found between these fluctuations and plasma growth hormone concentrations. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of H3+xPMo12 xVxO40 heteropolyacids supported on HMS mesoporous molecular sieve and their catalytic performance in propene oxidation
Benadji, Siham; Eloy, Pierre; Léonard, Alexandre ULg et al

in Microporous and Mesoporous Materials (2012), 154

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See detailCharacterization of HA/FHA coatings on smooth and rough implant surface by pulsed electrodeposition
Bir, F; Khireddine, H; Ksouri, D et al

in International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology (2015), 12(S3), 222-234

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 ULg)