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See detailCommunication signals between the immune and nervous systems
Geenen, Vincent ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (1990)

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See detailCommunication skills training for residents:which variables predict learning of skills?
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves et al

in Open Journal of Medical Psychology (2012), 1

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See detailCommunication skills training: A study of residents' psychosocial and physiological variables which facilitate or inhibit the learning of assessment skills
Hasoppe, Jennifer; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves et al

in Psycho-oncology (2009, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (5 ULg)
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See detailCommunication strategy increases osteoporosis awareness in postmenopausal women
Tellier, V; De Maeseneer, J; Cartier, P et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (1999), 14(S1), 385

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See detailLa communication sur les plantes invasives: bilan et perspectives
Halford, Mathieu ULg

Conference (2013, September 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
See detailCommunication, médiation, vulgarisation
Servais, Christine ULg

Conference (2008, December 11)

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See detailCommunication, positionnement et GPS
Debouche, Charles ULg

in Journal des Ingénieurs (Le) (2003), 87

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See detailCommunication, positionnement et GPS
Debouche, Charles ULg

in Journal des Ingénieurs (Le) (2003), (87), 2-31

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See detailLes communications intercellulaires au niveau des centres germinatifs.
Heinen, Ernst ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(3), 118-22

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See detailCommuniquer en temps de crise alimentaire
Fallon, Catherine ULg; Brunet, Sébastien ULg

in CRA-W (Ed.) ) Communiquer en temps de crise alimentaire. Image et Communication : Pourquoi ? Pour qui ? Comment ? (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (12 ULg)
See detailCommuniquer ou mourir : vers une société de la surcommunication ?
Vromans, Joseph ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

Internet, e-mail, SMS, chat, blogs, forums, Facebook, Twitter: on n’a jamais autant communiqué, à toute heure du jour et de la nuit. Nous vivons désormais dans une société où les réseaux sociaux et les ... [more ▼]

Internet, e-mail, SMS, chat, blogs, forums, Facebook, Twitter: on n’a jamais autant communiqué, à toute heure du jour et de la nuit. Nous vivons désormais dans une société où les réseaux sociaux et les nouveaux médias dominent, et où la communication est reine. Encore faut-il pouvoir déceler dans cette masse de cyberlangage ce qui nous intéresse. Et oser se poser la question : au milieu de toutes ces informations, l’essentiel ne se perd-il pas ? Est-ce que trop d’info ne tue pas l’info ? Il faudra sans doute se rendre à l’évidence : aujourd’hui, la communication s’effectue de plus en plus par l’intermédiaire d’interfaces technologiques. Mais au milieu de toutes les influences médiatiques, ne sommes-nous pas saturés de communication ? [less ▲]

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See detailCommunity assembly along a soil depth gradient: contrasting patterns of plant trait convergence and divergence in a Mediterranean rangeland
Bernard-Verdier, Maud; Navas, Marie-Laure; Vellend, Mark et al

in Journal of Ecology (2012), (100), 1422-1433

1. Understanding how environmental factors drive plant community assembly remains a major challenge in community ecology. The strength of different assembly processes along environmental gradients, such ... [more ▼]

1. Understanding how environmental factors drive plant community assembly remains a major challenge in community ecology. The strength of different assembly processes along environmental gradients, such as environmental filtering and functional niche differentiation, can be quantified by analysing trait distributions in communities. While environmental filtering affects species occurrence among communities, functional divergence or convergence is strongly related to species abundances within communities, which few studies have taken into account. We examine the trait-mediated effect of these two processes along a stress-resource gradient. 2. We measured species abundances and the distributions of eight traits related to vegetative and regenerative phases in plant communities along a gradient of soil depth and resource availability in Mediterranean rangelands. We quantified environmental filtering, defined as a local restriction of trait range, and trait divergence, based on abundance-weighted trait variance, using a two-step approach with specifically designed null models. 3. Communities presented a clear functional response to the soil gradient, as evidenced by strong trends in community-weighted trait means. We detected environmental filtering of different traits at both ends of the gradient, suggesting that, contrary to widespread expectations, trait filtering may not necessarily be the result of abiotic filtering under harsh conditions but could likely also result from biotic interactions in productive habitats. 4. We found marked shifts in trait abundance distributions within communities along the gradient. Vegetative traits (e.g. leaf dry matter content) diverged on shallow soils, reflecting the coexistence of distinct water- and nutrient-use strategies in these constrained habitats and converged with increasing soil resource availability. By contrast, regenerative traits (e.g. seed mass) tended to diverge towards deeper soils, while plant reproductive heights diverged all along the gradient. 5. Synthesis: Our study highlights how the combination of abundance data with traits capturing different functional niches is critical to the detection of complex functional responses of plant communities to environmental gradients. We demonstrate that patterns of trait divergence and filtering are strongly contingent on both trait and environment such that there can be no expectation of a simple trend of increasing or decreasing functional divergence along a gradient of resource availability. [less ▲]

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See detailCOMMUNITY FORESTS IN CENTRAL AFRICA: PRESENT HURDLES AND PROSPECTIVE EVOLUTIONS
Karsenty, Alain; Lescuyer, Guillaume; Ezzine de Blas, Driss et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailCommunity gardening in Wallonia and Brussels : proposals for research and actions
Minet, Julien ULg; Stevenne, Kari; Loicq, Gaël et al

Scientific conference (2013, May 23)

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See detailCommunity hunting in logging concessions: towards a management model for Cameroon’s dense forests
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Julve Larrubia, C.; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2009), 18(10), 2705-2718

In central Africa, commercial poaching and local village hunting are still two major issues that logging companies must address through the implementation of effective management plans in order to certify ... [more ▼]

In central Africa, commercial poaching and local village hunting are still two major issues that logging companies must address through the implementation of effective management plans in order to certify their concessions. However, current problems in developing suitable hunting management schemes for dense tropical forests arise from (1) the difficulty associated with setting quotas which take into account indiscriminate local hunting practices (e.g. snare trapping) and the ill-defined modes of resource appropriation by local populations, (2) the difficulty associated with evaluating the effect of illegal hunting, i.e. poaching, and (3) the relative complexity of the main available model. To overcome this, we propose to develop alternative management models where village hunting is planned along the same lines as existing logging operation models, through the implementation of a system of spatio-temporal rotation of hunting areas. In practice, the logging concession, initially divided into annual logging areas, is divided into similar annual hunting areas (AHAs), which are opened to hunting during the year preceding the logging operations. A depletion of the wildlife stock is expected within the annually opened hunting areas, but the model assumes a progressive re-colonization of the depleted AHA in subsequent years from neighbouring ones. In this paper, an empirical model of such a controlled hunting system employing spatio-temporal rotation of hunting areas is tested within a Forestry Management Unit (FMU) covering 47,585 ha in the Dja region, in south-east Cameroon. The model, based on large forest areas, seems particularly well adapted to Cameroon’s dense forests because it fits within the existing legal framework of Community-Managed Zones of Hunting Interest (CMZHI) and is aligned with current logging concession operations. Preliminary results suggest that sustainable hunting can be achieved in the FMU, provided a management scheme of AHAs is strictly enforced through effective stakeholder commitment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe community of Hymenoptera parasitizing necrophagous Diptera in an urban biotope
Frederickx, Christine ULg; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica ULg; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in Journal of Insect Science [=JIS] (2013), 13(32),

Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonisation of a dead body. The ... [more ▼]

Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonisation of a dead body. The use of Hymenoptera parasitoids in forensic entomology can be relevant to evaluate the time of death. Hymenoptera parasitoids of the larvae and pupae of flies may play an important role in the estimation of the post-mortem period, because their time of attack is often restricted to a small, well-defined windows of time in the development of the host insect. However, these parasitoids can interfere with the developmental times of colonising Diptera, and therefore a better understanding of their ecology is needed. The work reported here monitored the presence of adult Hymenoptera parasitoids on decaying pig carcasses in an urban biotope during the summer season (from May to September). Six families and six species were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday, Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker, Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead, Trichopria sp., and Figites sp. In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus. These five species colonise a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses: Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae [less ▲]

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See detailCommunity Sanctions and Measures in Belgium
Lauwaert, Katrien ULg; Aertsen, Ivo

in Albrecht, Hans-Jörg; van Kalmthout, Anton (Eds.) Community Sanctions and Measures in Europe and North America (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)