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See detailClostridies humaines et animales
Mainil, Jacques ULg

Scientific conference (2004, May)

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See detailClostridium difficile from food and surface samples in a Belgian nursing home: An unlikely source of contamination
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

in Anaerobe (2015), 32

This study investigates the contamination of foods and surfaces with Clostridium difficile in a single nursing home. C. difficile PCR-ribotype 078 was found in one food sample and in none of the tested ... [more ▼]

This study investigates the contamination of foods and surfaces with Clostridium difficile in a single nursing home. C. difficile PCR-ribotype 078 was found in one food sample and in none of the tested surfaces. These results indicate that food and surfaces are an unlikely source of C. difficile infection in this setting. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium difficile in young farm animals and slaughter animals in Belgium
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Vandebroek, Johan et al

in Anaerobe (2012), 18(6), 621-625

Faecal carriage of Clostridium difficile in healthy animals has been reported recently, especially in piglets and calves. However there is limited data about carriage in animals just prior to slaughter in ... [more ▼]

Faecal carriage of Clostridium difficile in healthy animals has been reported recently, especially in piglets and calves. However there is limited data about carriage in animals just prior to slaughter in Europe. The main objective of this study was to determine the presence of C. difficile in pigs and cattle at the slaughterhouse. C. difficile was isolated in 6.9% of the cattle at the slaughterhouse. None of the pig slaughter samples were positive for C. difficile after an enrichment time of 72 h. For complementary data, a short study was conducted in piglets and calves at farms. C. difficile was more prevalent in piglets (78.3%) than in calves (22.2%) on the farms. Regarding the piglet samples, 27.8% of the positive samples were detected without enrichment of stools. The PCR ribotype 078 was predominant in farm animals. Samples isolated from slaughter cattle presented the widest range in PCR-ribotype variety, and the most prevalent PCR ribotype was 118a UCL. The results of this study confirm that C. difficile is present in slaughter animals in Belgium with a large percentage of toxigenic strains also commonly found in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium difficile infection in elderly nursing home residents.
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

in Anaerobe (2014), 30

Age-related changes in intestinal flora and host defences, the receipt of antibiotic treatment, and the presence of underlying diseases are some of the most common risk factors associated with Clostridium ... [more ▼]

Age-related changes in intestinal flora and host defences, the receipt of antibiotic treatment, and the presence of underlying diseases are some of the most common risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection. Therefore, retirement care facilities for elderly people have been pinpointed as frequent sources of contamination. There is only limited data regarding the presence and epidemiology of C. difficile in nursing homes, and this gap in the current literature emphasises the need to gain a better understanding of the situation in order to prevent the emergence of new outbreaks among this population group. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium difficile: an emerging zoonotic pathogen ?
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Avesani, Véronique et al

Conference (2013, November 21)

Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that remains the main cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in humans after use of antibiotics. C. difficile has also been described in other ... [more ▼]

Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that remains the main cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in humans after use of antibiotics. C. difficile has also been described in other environments outside of hospitals, such as soil, river and seawater samples (Pasquale et al., 2011) and in animals, in which it can also cause enteric disease (Songer and Anderson, 2006). The possibility of transmission of C. difficile pathogenic isolates between animals, environments and humans has been suggested (Janezic et al., 2012). In recent years, the interest in C. difficile in food and in food animals has increased, leading to studying animals as a possible reservoir and a potential risk for food borne infections linked to C. difficile. Studies in various countries have determined differences in the prevalence of C. difficile in animals just before slaughter (Houser et al., 2012; Rodriguez et al., 2012) as well as in retail meat (Houser et al., 2012). In addition, many types, including PCR-ribotype 078, are present in humans, animals and meat (Janezic et al.; Weese et al., 2009). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of C. difficile at the slaughterhouse and in retail meat. Intestinal and carcass samples were collected from pigs and cattle at a single slaughterhouse. Raw meat (beef and pork) was obtained from the retail trade. C. difficile was isolated in 1% and 9.9% of the pig and cattle intestinal contents and in 7.9% and 7% of cattle and pig carcass samples respectively. From retail meat, C. difficile was recovered from 2.3% of the beef samples and from 4.7% of the pork samples. A total of 21 different PCR-ribotypes were identified with a large percentage of types 078 and 014. This study confirms that animals are carriers of C. difficile at slaughter, and that carcass contamination occurs inside the slaughterhouse. Furthermore the results obtained also reveal the presence of toxigenic C. difficile in retail meat in Belgium with a predominance of isolates correlated with the PCR-ribotypes involved in human C. difficile infections. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium difficile: méthodes de diagnostic microbiologique.
HUYNEN, Pascale ULg

Conference (2012, November 20)

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See detailClostridium enterotoxemie bij kalveren
Mainil, Jacques ULg

Scientific conference (1999, April)

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See detailClostridium perfringens et pathologies digestives.
Daube, Georges ULg

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1992), 136

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See detailClostridium perfringens hip arthritis in a haemodialysis patient.
Ho, T. T.; Labriola, L.; JOURET, François ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2012), 67(1), 49-50

Haemodialysis patients have acquired immunity disturbances, co-morbidities and a vascular access, factors predisposing them to infection and bacteraemia. Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium ... [more ▼]

Haemodialysis patients have acquired immunity disturbances, co-morbidities and a vascular access, factors predisposing them to infection and bacteraemia. Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium potentially causing severe infections, including rarely septic arthritis. We report the first case of Clostridium perfringens septic arthritis in a haemodialysis patient and suggest a haematogenous spread. After rapid joint lavage combined with appropriate anti-microbial therapy, the patient recovered. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium perfringens urease genes are plasmid-borne.
Dupuy, B.; Daube, Georges ULg; Popoff, M. R. et al

in Infection and Immunity (1997), 65

Although many bacteria are ureolytic, and in some cases urease acts as a virulence factor, the urease phenotype has not been analyzed in the anaerobic pathogen Clostridium perfringens. In this study, ;2 ... [more ▼]

Although many bacteria are ureolytic, and in some cases urease acts as a virulence factor, the urease phenotype has not been analyzed in the anaerobic pathogen Clostridium perfringens. In this study, ;2% of C. perfringens strains, representing the principal biotypes, were found to harbor the urease structural genes, ureABC, and these were localized on large plasmids that often encode, in addition, the lethal « or i toxins or the enterotoxin. This represents the first report of a plasmid-encoded urease in a gram-positive bacterium. The C. perfringens enzyme was highly similar to the ureases of other bacteria and cross-reacted with antibodies raised against the urease purified from Helicobacter pylori. Urease production was inhibited by urea and induced under growth conditions where the availability of nitrogen sources was limiting. To date, this form of regulation has been observed only for chromosomal ureABC genes. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium spiroforme toxin genes are related to C. perfringens iota toxin genes but have a different genomic localization.
Gilbert, M.; Perelle, S.; Daube, Georges ULg et al

in Systematic & Applied Microbiology (1997), 20

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See detailClosure of "a unified approach to transient stability contingency filtering, ranking, and assessment"
Ernst, Damien ULg; Ruiz-Vega, Daniel; Pavella, Mania ULg et al

in IEEE Transactions on Power Systems (2002), 17(2), 528-529

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See detailClosure to "Energy Dissipation and Turbulent Production in Weak Hydraulic Jumps" by E. Mignot and R. Cienfuegos
Mignot, E.; Peltier, Yann ULg; Cienfuegos, R.

in Journal of Hydraulic Engineering (2011), 137(8), 862-863

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See detailClosure to “Parapet Wall Effect on Piano Key Weir Efficiency”
Erpicum, Sébastien ULg; Machiels, Olivier; Pirotton, Michel ULg et al

in Journal of Irrigation & Drainage Engineering (2014)

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See detailClotridial hydrogenases and the biohydrogen production
Calusinska, Magdalena ULg; Hamilton, Christopher ULg; Masset, Julien ULg et al

Poster (2010, July 01)

Among the large variety of microorganisms capable of fermentative hydrogen production, strict anaerobes such as Clostridium spp. are one of the most widely studied. They produce hydrogen by butyric and ... [more ▼]

Among the large variety of microorganisms capable of fermentative hydrogen production, strict anaerobes such as Clostridium spp. are one of the most widely studied. They produce hydrogen by butyric and mixed-acid fermentations at optimal pH values ranging from 4.5 to 5.5. While fermentative conditions such as substrate type, pH, hydraulic and solid retention time, H2 partial pressure and the concentration of acids produced have been extensively studied and optimized, relatively little is known about the different forms of hydrogenases present in clostridia. Building on previous reports [1, 2] and by analyzing sequenced genomes, we found that [FeFe] hydrogenases are not a homogenous group of enzymes, but exist in multiple forms with different modular structures and are especially abundant in Clostridum spp. [3]. However, among the numerous studies performed on fermentative hydrogen production by Clostridium sp., only a few are specifically concerned with hydrogenases. Even there the authors focus on one type of [FeFe] hydrogenase, (CpI-like) without considering the existence of multiple forms of this enzyme within one species. Therefore, we focused our research on the better characterization of different forms of hydrogenases present in the genus Clostridium. Using newly designed degenerate primers, specific for clostridial hydrogenases, we amplified different hydrogenases from our species of interest. Further, by designing specific qPCR assays we have quantitatively targeted different hydrogenases. By analyzing differential gene expression, according to applied growth conditions, we believe to optimize the hydrogen production process in order to achieve better production rates. To conclude, we think that a a precise knowledge of hydrogen metabolism and hydrogenases is essential to optimization of the biohydrogen production process and should therefore be a goal for future research. [less ▲]

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See detailClou de rue chez le cheval
Gabriel, Annick ULg; Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Hontoir, F et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2011), 155

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (12 ULg)