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Peer Reviewed
See detailLes communications intercellulaires au niveau des centres germinatifs.
Heinen, Ernst ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(3), 118-22

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
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See detailCommuniquer en temps de crise alimentaire
Fallon, Catherine ULg; Brunet, Sébastien ULg

in CRA-W (Ed.) ) Communiquer en temps de crise alimentaire. Image et Communication : Pourquoi ? Pour qui ? Comment ? (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (12 ULg)
See detailCommuniquer ou mourir : vers une société de la surcommunication ?
Vromans, Joseph ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

Internet, e-mail, SMS, chat, blogs, forums, Facebook, Twitter: on n’a jamais autant communiqué, à toute heure du jour et de la nuit. Nous vivons désormais dans une société où les réseaux sociaux et les ... [more ▼]

Internet, e-mail, SMS, chat, blogs, forums, Facebook, Twitter: on n’a jamais autant communiqué, à toute heure du jour et de la nuit. Nous vivons désormais dans une société où les réseaux sociaux et les nouveaux médias dominent, et où la communication est reine. Encore faut-il pouvoir déceler dans cette masse de cyberlangage ce qui nous intéresse. Et oser se poser la question : au milieu de toutes ces informations, l’essentiel ne se perd-il pas ? Est-ce que trop d’info ne tue pas l’info ? Il faudra sans doute se rendre à l’évidence : aujourd’hui, la communication s’effectue de plus en plus par l’intermédiaire d’interfaces technologiques. Mais au milieu de toutes les influences médiatiques, ne sommes-nous pas saturés de communication ? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailCommunity assembly along a soil depth gradient: contrasting patterns of plant trait convergence and divergence in a Mediterranean rangeland
Bernard-Verdier, Maud; Navas, Marie-Laure; Vellend, Mark et al

in Journal of Ecology (2012), (100), 1422-1433

1. Understanding how environmental factors drive plant community assembly remains a major challenge in community ecology. The strength of different assembly processes along environmental gradients, such ... [more ▼]

1. Understanding how environmental factors drive plant community assembly remains a major challenge in community ecology. The strength of different assembly processes along environmental gradients, such as environmental filtering and functional niche differentiation, can be quantified by analysing trait distributions in communities. While environmental filtering affects species occurrence among communities, functional divergence or convergence is strongly related to species abundances within communities, which few studies have taken into account. We examine the trait-mediated effect of these two processes along a stress-resource gradient. 2. We measured species abundances and the distributions of eight traits related to vegetative and regenerative phases in plant communities along a gradient of soil depth and resource availability in Mediterranean rangelands. We quantified environmental filtering, defined as a local restriction of trait range, and trait divergence, based on abundance-weighted trait variance, using a two-step approach with specifically designed null models. 3. Communities presented a clear functional response to the soil gradient, as evidenced by strong trends in community-weighted trait means. We detected environmental filtering of different traits at both ends of the gradient, suggesting that, contrary to widespread expectations, trait filtering may not necessarily be the result of abiotic filtering under harsh conditions but could likely also result from biotic interactions in productive habitats. 4. We found marked shifts in trait abundance distributions within communities along the gradient. Vegetative traits (e.g. leaf dry matter content) diverged on shallow soils, reflecting the coexistence of distinct water- and nutrient-use strategies in these constrained habitats and converged with increasing soil resource availability. By contrast, regenerative traits (e.g. seed mass) tended to diverge towards deeper soils, while plant reproductive heights diverged all along the gradient. 5. Synthesis: Our study highlights how the combination of abundance data with traits capturing different functional niches is critical to the detection of complex functional responses of plant communities to environmental gradients. We demonstrate that patterns of trait divergence and filtering are strongly contingent on both trait and environment such that there can be no expectation of a simple trend of increasing or decreasing functional divergence along a gradient of resource availability. [less ▲]

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See detailCOMMUNITY FORESTS IN CENTRAL AFRICA: PRESENT HURDLES AND PROSPECTIVE EVOLUTIONS
Karsenty, Alain; Lescuyer, Guillaume; Ezzine de Blas, Driss et al

Conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (5 ULg)
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See detailCommunity gardening in Wallonia and Brussels : proposals for research and actions
Minet, Julien ULg; Stevenne, Kari; Loicq, Gaël et al

Scientific conference (2013, May 23)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailCommunity hunting in logging concessions: towards a management model for Cameroon’s dense forests
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Julve Larrubia, C.; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2009), 18(10), 2705-2718

In central Africa, commercial poaching and local village hunting are still two major issues that logging companies must address through the implementation of effective management plans in order to certify ... [more ▼]

In central Africa, commercial poaching and local village hunting are still two major issues that logging companies must address through the implementation of effective management plans in order to certify their concessions. However, current problems in developing suitable hunting management schemes for dense tropical forests arise from (1) the difficulty associated with setting quotas which take into account indiscriminate local hunting practices (e.g. snare trapping) and the ill-defined modes of resource appropriation by local populations, (2) the difficulty associated with evaluating the effect of illegal hunting, i.e. poaching, and (3) the relative complexity of the main available model. To overcome this, we propose to develop alternative management models where village hunting is planned along the same lines as existing logging operation models, through the implementation of a system of spatio-temporal rotation of hunting areas. In practice, the logging concession, initially divided into annual logging areas, is divided into similar annual hunting areas (AHAs), which are opened to hunting during the year preceding the logging operations. A depletion of the wildlife stock is expected within the annually opened hunting areas, but the model assumes a progressive re-colonization of the depleted AHA in subsequent years from neighbouring ones. In this paper, an empirical model of such a controlled hunting system employing spatio-temporal rotation of hunting areas is tested within a Forestry Management Unit (FMU) covering 47,585 ha in the Dja region, in south-east Cameroon. The model, based on large forest areas, seems particularly well adapted to Cameroon’s dense forests because it fits within the existing legal framework of Community-Managed Zones of Hunting Interest (CMZHI) and is aligned with current logging concession operations. Preliminary results suggest that sustainable hunting can be achieved in the FMU, provided a management scheme of AHAs is strictly enforced through effective stakeholder commitment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (16 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailThe community of Hymenoptera parasitizing necrophagous Diptera in an urban biotope
Frederickx, Christine ULg; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica ULg; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in Journal of Insect Science [=JIS] (2013), 13(32),

Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonisation of a dead body. The ... [more ▼]

Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonisation of a dead body. The use of Hymenoptera parasitoids in forensic entomology can be relevant to evaluate the time of death. Hymenoptera parasitoids of the larvae and pupae of flies may play an important role in the estimation of the post-mortem period, because their time of attack is often restricted to a small, well-defined windows of time in the development of the host insect. However, these parasitoids can interfere with the developmental times of colonising Diptera, and therefore a better understanding of their ecology is needed. The work reported here monitored the presence of adult Hymenoptera parasitoids on decaying pig carcasses in an urban biotope during the summer season (from May to September). Six families and six species were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday, Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker, Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead, Trichopria sp., and Figites sp. In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus. These five species colonise a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses: Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (7 ULg)
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See detailCommunity Sanctions and Measures in Belgium
Lauwaert, Katrien ULg; Aertsen, Ivo

in Albrecht, Hans-Jörg; van Kalmthout, Anton (Eds.) Community Sanctions and Measures in Europe and North America (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailCommunity-Based Health Insurance Schemes in Africa: Which Factors Really Induce Membership ?
Defourny, Jacques ULg; Failon, Julie ULg

Conference (2008, July)

Health micro-insurance systems have experienced a fast development for some fifteen years in sub-Saharan Africa as a means of improving the access of the poor to healthcare services. The present article ... [more ▼]

Health micro-insurance systems have experienced a fast development for some fifteen years in sub-Saharan Africa as a means of improving the access of the poor to healthcare services. The present article focuses mainly on community-based health insurance (CBHI) systems, as they currently constitute one of the most developed forms of health micro-insurance. However, it must be acknowledged that the enrolment rates remain particularly weak and coverage of the target population only rarely reaches 10%. Several authors have already observed this fact and undertaken research on the factors which influence enrolment. Nevertheless, the methodologies used, size of the samples, characteristics of the surveyed individuals, inclusion or not of non-members in the surveys, geographical areas etc. vary a lot from one author to the other. This is why this article aims at synthesizing the empirical studies carried out to date and to identify major concurring results beyond methodological differences. We finally come out with two factors which seem to play a major role and six others which seem to have a significant influence on enrolment, while surveys do not confirm the role of various other variables. We conclude with some lessons regarding the roles of the promoters and supporting NGOs in the establishment of CBHI schemes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 195 (22 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailCommunity-based wildlife management in Burkina Faso : the experiments of the Nazinga Ranch and W park
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg

in Game and Wildlife Science (2004), 21(3), 313-326

Le Burkina Faso reste le seul pays d’Afrique occidentale à posséder une législation où, au moins légalement, la gestion cynégétique de la faune sauvage par les populations locales est devenue une réalité ... [more ▼]

Le Burkina Faso reste le seul pays d’Afrique occidentale à posséder une législation où, au moins légalement, la gestion cynégétique de la faune sauvage par les populations locales est devenue une réalité. Les textes de loi prévoient en effet la possibilité pour les populations de délimiter sur leurs terroirs des zones dévolues à la chasse commerciale, d’y faire venir des chasseurs et de rétrocéder à l’État la part des recettes qui lui est due. La loi prévoit également la constitution de Comités Villageois de Gestion de la Faune (CVGF), structures rattachées aux Comités Villageois de Gestion de Terroir (CVGT) et reconnues dans le processus de décentralisation en cours. L’opportunité de construire une conservation de la faune sauvage servant directement le développement local existe donc. Dans la pratique, il reste encore beaucoup d’étapes à franchir avant que des Zones Villageoises d’Intérêt Cynégétique (ZOVIC) réellement autonomes et indépendantes financièrement ne prennent corps. Les résistances au niveau institutionnel et privé ne manquent pas, et seule la démonstration de la capacité des populations locales à relever ce défi pourra faire évoluer les mentalités. Les premières ZOVIC ont été mises en place à partir de 2000 dans les périphéries du Ranch de Nazinga (1 276 ha de ZOVIC) et du Parc du W (1 790 ha de ZOVIC). Ces expériences ont été la source de riches enseignements dans des contextes particuliers de tensions foncières, liés soit à une importante immigration humaine dans le cas de la ZOVIC du Ranch de Nazinga, soit à une course au coton dans celui des ZOVIC du Parc du W. Elles ont montré que la gestion cynégétique villageoise nécessitait des besoins de formation importants et qu’elle devait faire face aux classiques enjeux techniques (préservation de l’habitat, gestion de la faune, quotas d’abattage dont l’application reste parfois aléatoire en raison de la petite taille des zones délimitées, etc.). Les ZOVIC ont aussi soulevé le problème du rapport de la communauté rurale à l’espace et au foncier, celui fonctionnement des structures locales de gestion et de leur fusion avec le système politique coutumier local, et celui de la réelle volonté de l’univers administratif et privé de la chasse à partager la rente cynégétique avec les populations locales. La gestion cynégétique villageoise doit donc être comprise comme un exercice de démocratie directe et comme la voie vers la gestion globale des terroirs villageois. Au-delà de l’aspect technique lié à la faune et à sa gestion durable, la réussite de ces expériences devrait également annoncer la pratique d’une chasse plus sociale et plus équitable, où les populations locales participeraient davantage au partage du flux financier. [less ▲]

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See detailCommutation de paquets logicielle sur routeurs PC multi-coeurs
Egi, Norbert; Greenhalgh, Adam; Handley, Mark et al

in Actes de CFIP 2009 (2009, October)

Les processeurs multi-coeurs sur PC, en même temps que les progrès récents sur la performance de la mémoire et des bus, suggèrent un candidat idéal pour la construction d’architectures de routeurs ... [more ▼]

Les processeurs multi-coeurs sur PC, en même temps que les progrès récents sur la performance de la mémoire et des bus, suggèrent un candidat idéal pour la construction d’architectures de routeurs purement logicielles qui soient flexibles et en même temps performantes. Dans cet article, nous présentons une architecture de commutation de paquets pour les routeurs logiciels ou virtuels dont l’objectif principal est de prévenir des accès mémoire coûteux tout en utilisant les ressources CPU disponibles au mieux pour traiter et commuter les paquets. Nous présentons premièrement le principe d’arbre de commutation dont la fonction est de garder les paquets commutés dans la même hiérarchie de cache du processeur. Nous identifions ensuite la source de contention principale des performances de commutation comme l’accès concurrent aux interfaces de sorties puis analysons les gains potentiels de performance en utilisant un verrou sur les interfaces de sortie ainsi qu’un mécanisme de retour sur l’état des queues du routeur. Finalement, nous proposons et évaluons une modification des arbres de commutation qui permet de contourner la contention due au partage des interfaces de sortie par les arbres [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailThe commutative closure of a binary slip-language is context-free: a new proof
Rigo, Michel ULg

in Discrete Applied Mathematics (2003), 131(3), 665-672

Using original arguments about sets of integers satisfying some first-order formula of the Presburger arithmetic <N, +>, we give a new proof that the commutative closure of a slip-language over a two ... [more ▼]

Using original arguments about sets of integers satisfying some first-order formula of the Presburger arithmetic <N, +>, we give a new proof that the commutative closure of a slip-language over a two letters alphabet is context-free. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
See detailLa commutazione in Glossematica
Cigana, Lorenzo ULg

Scientific conference (2011, May 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailComo combinar la integracion y la diversidad : El dasafio de una ciudadania multicultural en la UE
Martiniello, Marco ULg

Book published by Observatorio Vasco de Inmigracion - (Spanish and Basque versions) (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
See detailComo construire le scale descrittive di valutazione
De Landsheere, Gilbert ULg

Book published by Lisciani e Zampetti (1979)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailComo enseñan los profesores : analisis de las interacciones verbales en clase
De Landsheere, Gilbert ULg; Bayer, Esteban

Book published by Santillana (1977)

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (0 ULg)
See detailComo mejorar la enseñanza multilingüe y multicultural en Bolivia ?
Lucchini, Silvia ULg

Scientific conference (2006, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)