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See detail18F-MPPF Pharmacokinetics in rat hippocampus imaged with MicroPet.
Rubin, D. J.; Way, B.; Lacan, G. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine (2002), 43(S1), 209

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See detail18F-substituted aromatic aldehydes, key intermediates for nca radiosyntheses.
Lemaire, Christian ULg; Guillaume, M.; Plenevaux, Alain ULg et al

in Journal of Labelled Compounds & Radiopharmaceuticals (1991), 30

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See detail18F-tyrosine PET in Neurooncology : an alternative to 11C-methionine.
KASCHTEN; LEMAIRE, C.; LUXEN, A. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2004), 45(SUPPL), 264

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See detail[18F]fallypride binding in the mouse brain: test-retest and effects of registration
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Geuzaine, Annabelle ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg et al

Conference (2011, January 17)

The quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with PET tracer experiments is an intricate and challenging problem especially for small animals such as rats and mice. A test-retest scan is usually set up ... [more ▼]

The quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with PET tracer experiments is an intricate and challenging problem especially for small animals such as rats and mice. A test-retest scan is usually set up in order to confirm an observed experimental effect or to examine the reliability of the experiment design. Inadequate processing of the image data may also mask small effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of image registration on [18F]fallypride binding potentials calculated from PET mouse test-retest data. Sub-optimal registration affected the quantification of in vivo receptor kinetics with [18F]fallypride. The absence of anatomical information in the [18F]fallypride image and the lack of a homogeneous tracer distribution, even during the earlier minutes of the scan, lead to erroneous automatic registration. A FDG scan after each [18F]fallypride test could improve registration as FDG provides a more homogeneous brain image. Variability in the data could also result from stress induced by anaesthesia or the experimental environment. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]FMT: a reliable PET tracer for in vivo evaluation of dopaminergic dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease rat model.
Seret, Alain ULg; Becker, Guillaume ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 09)

Background: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-[18F]fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-[18F]FMT) is ... [more ▼]

Background: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-[18F]fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-[18F]FMT) is an effective PET tracer to evaluate of DA terminals integrity and L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) metabolic pathway. However, there are currently no available quantitative PET studies using [18F]FMT in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of in vivo PET study using [18F]FMT on 6-OHDA PD’s model. Methods: 10 µg of 6-OHDA were injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8). As control, sham-treated rats (n=8) were injected with vehicle only but otherwise treated identically. Striatal DA presynaptic activity was assessed by dynamic [18F]FMT PET, 30 min after benserazide pretreatment. Structural T2-weighted brain images were acquired on a 9.4T MRI and were used for co-registration. After normalization on a MRI template, kinetic analysis was performed by “Patlak Reference” model, using PMOD software. Results: Striatal accumulation of [18F]FMT was observed in rats pretreated with benserazide, a peripheral AAAD inhibitor. As consequence of the 6-OHDA-lesion, significant decrease of [18F]FMT accumulation was recorded in the striatum ipsilateral to the lesion. Lesioned rats had dramatically reduced uptake constant Ki in the ipsilateral striatum compared to the contralateral striatum (p<0.001) and to the ipsilateral striatum of sham-treated rats (p<0.005). The Ki ratio (Ipsi./Contra.) was equivalent to 94% in the sham group and dropped to 41% in the lesioned group. Conclusions: [18F]FMT PET enables us to quantify loss of DA presynaptic function in unilaterally 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results encourage us to pursue further investigations in a longitudinal way and to monitor the progression of the dopaminergic dysfunction in more moderate and gradual preclinical PD models. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT imaging of integrin αvβ3 levels in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; Martinive, Philippe ULg; VANDERICK, Jean ULg et al

in European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging (2016)

PURPOSE: Our primary objective was to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Our primary objective was to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Secondary objectives were to compare baseline [18F]FPRGD2 and [18F]FDG uptake, to evaluate the correlation between posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 uptake and tumour microvessel density (MVD) and to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG PET/CT could predict disease-free survival. METHODS: Baseline [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG PET/CT were performed in 32 consecutive patients (23 men, 9 women; mean age 63 +/- 8 years) with LARC before starting any therapy. A posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT scan was performed in 24 patients after the end of CRT (median interval 7 weeks, range 3 - 15 weeks) and before surgery (median interval 4 days, range 1 - 15 days). RESULTS: All LARC showed uptake of both [18F]FPRGD2 (SUVmax 5.4 +/- 1.5, range 2.7 - 9) and FDG (SUVmax 16.5 +/- 8, range 7.1 - 36.5). There was a moderate positive correlation between [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG SUVmax (Pearson's r = 0.49, p = 0.0026). There was a moderate negative correlation between baseline [18F]FPRGD2 SUVmax and the TRG (Spearman's r = -0.37, p = 0.037), and a [18F]FPRGD2 SUVmax of >5.6 identified all patients with a complete response (TRG 0; AUC 0.84, 95 % CI 0.68 - 1, p = 0.029). In the 24 patients who underwent a posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT scan the response index, calculated as [(SUVmax1 - SUVmax2)/SUVmax1] x 100 %, was not associated with TRG. Post-treatment [18F]FPRGD2 uptake was not correlated with tumour MVD. Neither [18F]FPRGD2 nor FDG uptake predicted disease-free survival. CONCLUSION: Baseline [18F]FPRGD2 uptake was correlated with the pathological response in patients with LARC treated with CRT. However, the specificity was too low to consider its clinical routine use. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H AS A BRAIN SV2A RADIOTRACER: A FIRST CLINICAL TRIAL
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Aerts, Joël ULg et al

Poster (2014, May 27)

[18F]UCB-H is a fluorine-18 radiolabelled PET imaging tracer with a high affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A). This protein, involved in vesicle trafficking and widely distributed in the ... [more ▼]

[18F]UCB-H is a fluorine-18 radiolabelled PET imaging tracer with a high affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A). This protein, involved in vesicle trafficking and widely distributed in the brain, represents the binding site and the primary mechanism of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam. Levetiracetam has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse Alzheimer’s disease model and to improve cognition in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, suggesting a possible role for this protein in synaptic integrity. The objective of this study was to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H in healthy human volunteers. Dynamic PET imaging of the head of four healthy volunteers was performed over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of GMP produced [18F]UCB-H. The input function was acquired by arterial blood sampling during the dynamic PET acquisition. Blood data analysis showed a consistent tracer amount in whole blood and plasma indicating a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. Unchanged [18F]UCB-H fraction in plasma follows a bi-exponential behavioral decrease with a starting fraction of 92% of the injected amount of the tracer, measured at 3 min post injection. This fraction decreases to about 50% at 10 min post injection. The [18F]UCB-H PET data revealed a high and rapid uptake in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout allowing the standard compartmental modeling (1-tissue compartment, 2-tissue compartment, and Logan graphical analysis). The three models gave consistent results. The two-tissue compartment model fitted the experimental data best and provided a total distribution volume of [18F]UCB-H in the brain greater than 7 mL/cm3 and a specific distribution volume around 3 mL/cm3. Our results indicate that [18F]UCB-H is a new radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins suitable for human studies. Further studies are warranted to assess SV2A modifications in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H AS A NEW PET RADIOTRACER FOR SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTEIN 2A
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Aerts, Joël ULg et al

Poster (2014, June 06)

Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown ... [more ▼]

Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, for example, by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of levetiracetam. Levetiracetam is an antiepileptic drug which has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease and to improve cognition in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, a fluorine-18 radiolabelled PET imaging tracer, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. [18F]UCB-H was radiosynthesized under GMP conditions. Dynamic PET data of the head of four healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function was obtained by blood sampling during the dynamic PET acquisition. The analysis of the blood data reveled a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma which indicates a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The unchanged fraction of [18F]UCB-H in plasma showed a bi-exponential behavioral decrease with a starting fraction of 92% of the injected amount of the tracer, measured at 3 min post injection. This fraction decreased to about 50% at 10 min post injection. The [18F]UCB-H PET data showed a high and rapid uptake in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout allowing the standard compartmental modeling (1-tissue compartment, 2-tissue compartment, and Logan graphical analysis). The three models gave consistent results. The two-tissue compartment model fitted the experimental data best and provided a total distribution volume of the [18F]UCB-H in the brain greater than 7 mL/cm3 and a specific distribution volume around 3 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies. In the future, SV2A modifications might be assessed in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H as a new PET radiotracer for Synaptic vesicle protein 2A: A first clinical trial
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Stifkens, Mathieu; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

SV2A is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is ... [more ▼]

SV2A is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of levetiracetam. Levetiracetam is an antiepileptic drug which has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. Dynamic PET data of the head of 4 healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of GMP produced [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function (IF) was obtained by blood sampling. The IF was also derived from the dynamic data using the correlation coefficient method. Blood data revealed a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma indicating a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The image-derived arterial IFs were showed to be very similar to the measured ones with a peak-ratio around 0.91 and an area-under-curve ratio about 0.98. The [18F]UCB-H PET data showed a high and rapid uptake in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout allowing the standard compartmental modeling (1-tissue, 2-tissue, and Logan Plot). The three models gave similar results with both the measured and image-derived IFs. The total distribution volume of the tracer in the brain was greater than 7 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies. Image-derived IF showed to be useful for quantitative studies without the need to the arterial blood sampling. SV2A modifications may consequently be assessed in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H as a new PET radiotracer for Synaptic vesicle protein 2A: A first clinical trial.
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Stifkens, M; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Tijdschrift voor Nucleaire Geneeskunde (2015, May 09), 37(3), 1457-1458

The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is ... [more ▼]

The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam. This drug has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. Dynamic PET data of the head of 4 healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of GMP produced [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function (IF) was obtained by blood sampling but also derived from the dynamic data using the correlation coefficient method. Blood data revealed a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma indicating a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The unchanged fraction of [18F]UCB-H in plasma showed a bi-exponential behavioral decrease with a starting fraction of 92% of the injected amount of the tracer, measured at 3 min post injection. This fraction decreased to about 50% at 10 min post injection. The image-derived arterial IFs showed to be very similar to the measured ones with a peak-ratio around 0.91 and an area-under-curve ratio about 0.98. The PET images showed a high and rapid uptake of [18F]UCB-H in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout. For the three standard compartmental models (1-tissue, 2-tissue, and Logan Plot), similar results were obtained with both the measured and image-derived IFs. Nevertheless the two-tissue compartment model fitted the experimental data best and provided a total distribution volume of the [18F]UCB-H in the brain greater than 7 mL/cm3 and a specific distribution volume around 3 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies (dosimetry has already been reported elsewhere). Image-derived IF showed to be useful for quantitative studies without the need to the arterial blood sampling. This new tracer could help to assess SV2A modifications in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detail18fdg-Pet for the Assessment of Primary Head and Neck Tumors: Clinical, Computed Tomography, and Histopathological Correlation in 38 Patients
Paulus, Patrick; Sambon, A.; Vivegnis, Danielle et al

in Laryngoscope (1998), 108(10), 1578-83

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical usefulness of FDG-PET (fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography) in the detection of lymph node involvement and recurrences in patients with head and neck ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical usefulness of FDG-PET (fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography) in the detection of lymph node involvement and recurrences in patients with head and neck cancer. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of 38 patients with biopsy-proven head and neck cancers who underwent clinical, computed tomography (CT), and FDG-PET examinations. Twenty-five patients were studied prior to therapy and 13 patients were evaluated for disease recurrence. METHODS: All patients were operated and clinical data, CT, and FDG-PET results were correlated with histopathological findings. RESULTS: All primary tumors in 25 patients were detected, with the exception of one small superficial localization of the epiglottis. Histopathological examination showed lymph node involvement in 10 patients; PET detected lymph node involvement in five. FDG-PET found one case of nodal disease not identified by clinical and CT examination. With so few cases, this could be anecdotal. Five false-negative results (microscopic lymph node involvement) and two false positives were noted. Twelve of 13 patients with recurrent disease were correctly identified with FDG-PET. FDG-PET was the only imaging technique to identify local recurrence in two patients and lymph node involvement in two others. One false-positive result occurred in a patient with a foreign body granuloma. CONCLUSIONS: FDG-PET is a useful diagnostic modality for the detection of recurrent tumors and, in selected cases, precise lymph node involvement. The best way to further investigate the utility of clinical FDG-PET is in the follow-up of treated patients. [less ▲]

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See detail18FDG-PET/CT IMAGING IN SUSPECTED ACUTE RENAL ALLOGRAFT REJECTION
LOVINFOSSE, Pierre ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BOVY, Christophe ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 13)

The diagnosis procedure for kidney transplant recipients (KTR) with suspected acute rejection (AR) relies on needle biopsy. Noninvasive tests to predict nonrejection would be preferable. AR is associated ... [more ▼]

The diagnosis procedure for kidney transplant recipients (KTR) with suspected acute rejection (AR) relies on needle biopsy. Noninvasive tests to predict nonrejection would be preferable. AR is associated with a recruitment of activated leukocytes into the transplant, which are characterized by a high metabolic activity and an increased uptake of glucose analog, Fluoro-deoxyglucose ( FDG). Thus, FDG-Positron emission tomography coupled with computed tomography (PET/CT) may help noninvasively distinguish nonrejection from AR. From January 2013 to February 2015, we prospectively performed 32 FDGPET/ CT in 31 adult KTR with suspected renal AR who underwent a biopsy. Biopsies were categorized as “normal”, “borderline”, “AR” or “others” according to Banff classification. PET/CT imaging was performed within 201 ± 18 minutes after i.v. administration of 3.2 ± 0.2 MBq/kg of FDG, before any modification of immunosuppression. The mean standard uptake values (SUV) of both upper and lower renal poles were measured, with no threshold activity. Biopsies were diagnosed as “normal”, “borderline”, “AR” or “others” in 8, 10, 8 and 6 (including 3 polyoma-BK nephropathies) cases. Mean SUV respectively reached 1.5 ± 0.2, 1.6 ± 0.3, 2.9 ± 0.8, 2.2 ± 1.2 in each category. Mean SUV of biopsy-proven AR was significantly higher than “normal” cases (p<0.01). No difference was found between “normal” vs. “borderline”, or between “AR” vs. “others” histopathology. Still, a positive correlation between mean SUV and acute composite (g+i+t+v+ptc) Banff score was found, with a coefficient of 0.70 (p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in detecting pathological biospies were respectively 92.3% and 36.8%, with a mean SUV threshold at 1.4. FDG-PET/CT imaging may help discriminate nonrejection, thereby avoiding unnecessary transplant biopsy in KTR with suspected AR. [less ▲]

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See detailThe 19 Feb. 2016 Outburst of Comet 67P/CG: An ESA Rosetta Multi-Instrument Study
Grün, E.; Agarwal, J.; Altobelli, N. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2016)

On 19 Feb. 2016 nine Rosetta instruments serendipitously observed an outburst of gas and dust from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Among these instruments were cameras and spectrometers ... [more ▼]

On 19 Feb. 2016 nine Rosetta instruments serendipitously observed an outburst of gas and dust from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Among these instruments were cameras and spectrometers ranging from UV over visible to microwave wavelengths, in-situ gas, dust and plasma instruments, and one dust collector. At 9:40 a dust cloud developed at the edge of an image in the shadowed region of the nucleus. Over the next two hours the instruments recorded a signature of the outburst that significantly exceeded the background. The enhancement ranged from 50% of the neutral gas density at Rosetta to factors >100 of the brightness of the coma near the nucleus. Dust related phenomena (dust counts or brightness due to illuminated dust) showed the strongest enhancements (factors >10). However, even the electron density at Rosetta increased by a factor 3 and consequently the spacecraft potential changed from ˜-16 V to -20 V during the outburst. A clear sequence of events was observed at the distance of Rosetta (34 km from the nucleus): within 15 minutes the Star Tracker camera detected fast particles (˜25 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]) while 100 μm radius particles were detected by the GIADA dust instrument ˜1 hour later at a speed of ~6 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. The slowest were individual mm to cm sized grains observed by the OSIRIS cameras. Although the outburst originated just outside the FOV of the instruments, the source region and the magnitude of the outburst could be determined. [less ▲]

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See detail(19) F NMR in vivo spectroscopy reflects the effectiveness of perfusion - enhancing vascular modifiers for improving gemcitabine chemotheraypy
Cron, Greg O.; Ansiaux; MARTINIVE, Philippe ULg et al

in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine : Official Journal of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (2008)

Laboratory of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance and Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, Université Catholique de Louvain, UCL, Brussels, Belgium. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of ... [more ▼]

Laboratory of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance and Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, Université Catholique de Louvain, UCL, Brussels, Belgium. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of fluorine-19 ((19)F NMR) has proven useful for evaluating kinetics of fluorinated chemotherapy drugs in tumors in vivo. This work investigated how three perfusion-enhancing vascular modifiers (BQ123, thalidomide, and Botulinum neurotoxin type A [BoNT-A]) would affect the chemotherapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine, a fluorinated drug widely used in human cancer treatment. Murine tumor growth experiments demonstrated that only BoNT-A showed a strong trend to enhance tumor growth inhibition by gemcitabine (1.7 days growth delay, P = 0.052, Student t-test). In accord with these results, (19)F NMR experiments showed that only BoNT-A increased significantly the uptake of gemcitabine in tumors (50% increase, P = 0.0008, Student t-test). Further experiments on gemcitabine kinetics (NMR vs time) and distribution ((19)F MRI) confirmed the uptake-enhancing properties of BoNT-A. The results of this study demonstrate that (19)F NMR can monitor modulation of the pharmacokinetics of fluorinated chemotherapy drugs in tumors. The results also show that (19)F NMR data can give a strong indication of the effectiveness of perfusion-enhancing vascular modifiers for improving gemcitabine chemotherapy in murine tumors. (19)F NMR is a promising tool for preclinical evaluation of such vascular modifiers and may ultimately be used in the clinic to monitor how these modifiers affect chemotherapy. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc PMID: 18050344 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] [less ▲]

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See detailThe 19-27 Amino-Acid Segment Of Gp51 Adopts An Amphiphilic Structure And Plays A Key Role In The Fusion Events Induced By Bovine Leukemia-Virus
Voneche, V.; Callebaut, I.; Kettmann, Richard ULg et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1992), 267(21),

Previous results indicate that the external glycoprotein gp51 of bovine leukemia virus plays an important role in the process of cell fusion induced by bovine leukemia virus (Bruck, C., Mathot, S ... [more ▼]

Previous results indicate that the external glycoprotein gp51 of bovine leukemia virus plays an important role in the process of cell fusion induced by bovine leukemia virus (Bruck, C., Mathot, S., Portetelle, D., Berte, C., Franssen, J. D., Herion, P., and Burny, A. (1982) Virology 122, 342-352; Voneche, V., Portetelle., D., Kettmann, R., Willems, L., Limbach, K., Paoletti, E., Ruysschaert, J. M., Burny, A., and Brasseur, R. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 89, 3810-3814) and suggest that a region encompassing residues 23 and 25 of gp51 is involved in this process (Portetelle, D., Couez, D., Bruck, C., Kettmann, R., Mammerickx, M., Van der Maaten, M., Brasseur, R., and Burny, A. (1989) Virology 169, 27-33; Mamoun, R., Morisson, M., Rebeyrotte, N., Busetta, B., Couez, D., Kettmann, R., Hospital, M., and Guillemain, B. (1990) J. Virol. 64, 4180-4188). X-ray diffraction studies performed on envelope glycoproteins of influenza virus indicate that the NH2-terminal part of the external glycoprotein lies very close to the fusion peptide. The same overall structure seems to exist in human immunodeficiency virus as suggested by site-directed mutagenesis followed by syncytia induction assays. Our theoretical studies indicate that a segment expanding between residues 19 and 27 of gp51 probably adopts an amphipathic beta-strand structure. We hypothesize that the amphipathic 19-27 structure of gp51 plays an important role in the process of membrane fusion by interacting with the fusion peptide or with another region of gp30. Mutational analysis disrupting the amphipathy of the 19-27 region strongly altered the fusogenic capacity of the gp51-gp30 complex. [less ▲]

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See detailA 19-miRNA SIGNATURE PREDICTS RELAPSE IN AVERAGE RISK PRE-B ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA
Lammens, TL; Ghazavi, F; Suciu, S et al

in Tijdschrift van de Belgische Kinderarts = Journal du Pédiatre Belge (2012), 2012(4), 78

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See detail19. Les femmes supportent-elles moins l'alcool que les hommes ?
DEVILLE, Marine ULg; DENOOZ, Raphael ULg; Charlier, Corinne ULg

in Seutin, Vincent; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline; Quertemont, Etienne (Eds.) L'alcool en questions (2015)

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