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See detailClinical Pattern of Corticosteroid Dependent Crohn's Disease
Franchimont, D. P.; Louis, Edouard ULg; Croes, F. et al

in European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (1998), 10(10), 821-5

OBJECTIVES: Corticosteroid dependency in Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by the need for chronic use of corticosteroids to maintain clinical remission. Several definitions have been used. Depending ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Corticosteroid dependency in Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by the need for chronic use of corticosteroids to maintain clinical remission. Several definitions have been used. Depending on the definition, 10-30% of the patients are considered as corticosteroid dependent. The aim of the study was to define a clinical pattern of corticosteroid dependent CD patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Epidemiological and clinical characteristics were retrospectively compared between 20 corticosteroid dependent CD patients and 248 non-corticosteroid dependent CD patients by using univariate and multivariate analyses. Corticosteroid dependency was defined either by two successive relapses during the 2 months after discontinuing glucocorticoids (n=5) or by two successive relapses at dose tapering, after successful treatment of a flare-up by using glucocorticoids (n=15). RESULTS: Corticosteroid dependent CD patients were younger at diagnosis (P < 0.001), and were characterized by a higher frequency of colonic location (P< 0.05), but lower frequency of ileal location (P < 0.01), and higher ano-perineal location (P < 0.05). They were also more frequently smokers (P< 0.05) and users of contraceptive pills (P< 0.01). The inflammatory type of the disease was increased (P < 0.01), while the fibrostenotic type was decreased (P < 0.001) in corticosteroid dependent CD patients. By multivariate analysis, a smoking habit (P < 0.01), a colonic location (P < 0.05), a non-fibrostenotic type (P< 0.05) and a younger age at diagnosis (P< 0.05) were shown to be independently associated with corticosteroid dependency. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests a clinical pattern associated with corticosteroid dependency. Whether this clinical pattern is simply associated with the dependency, or whether a primary decrease of corticosensitivity produces this clinical pattern, is not known. Further prospective studies will have to determine whether the presence of these clinical characteristics is predictive of corticosteroid dependency and whether this prediction will be useful for the management of this condition. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical performance of the C-PET camera.
SMITH, RJ.; HUSTINX, Roland ULg; ADAM, LE. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (1999), 40

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See detailClinical Perspectives in Emotional Intelligence
Hansenne, Michel ULg

in Emotional intelligence: New perspectives and applications (2012)

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See detailClinical PET in Oncology
Rigo, Pierre ULg; Paulus, Patrick; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

in Bergmann, H.; Kroiss, A.; Sinzinger H (Eds.) Radioactive Isotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research (1997)

18-FDG is accumulated in cancer cells. It has been proven useful to image a variety of tumors in conjunction with whole-body positron emission tomography. This review details somes of the indications of ... [more ▼]

18-FDG is accumulated in cancer cells. It has been proven useful to image a variety of tumors in conjunction with whole-body positron emission tomography. This review details somes of the indications of PET at various stages of the cancerous process : differential diagnosis, preoperative staging, diagnosis of residual or recurrent disease as well as follow-up of therapy. Consideration of several potential improvements in clinical PET and of the need for careful patients selection conclude this review. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical PET in Oncology
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Paulus, Danusia ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg et al

Book published by GE Medical Systems (1996)

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See detailClinical PET in oncology
Rigo, P.; Paulus, P.; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

in Radioactive Isotopes in Clinical Medicine Research XXII (1997)

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See detailClinical pharmacokinetics of metformin.
Scheen, André ULg

in Clinical Pharmacokinetics (1996), 30(5), 359-71

The biguanide metformin (dimethylbiguanide) is an oral antihyperglycaemic agent widely used in the management of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Considerable renewal of interest in this ... [more ▼]

The biguanide metformin (dimethylbiguanide) is an oral antihyperglycaemic agent widely used in the management of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Considerable renewal of interest in this drug has been observed in recent years. Metformin can be determined in biological fluids by various methods, mainly using high performance liquid chromatography, which allows pharmacokinetic studies in healthy volunteers and diabetic patients. Metformin disposition is apparently unaffected by the presence of diabetes and only slightly affected by the use of different oral formulations. Metformin has an absolute oral bioavailability of 40 to 60%, and gastrointestinal absorption is apparently complete within 6 hours of ingestion. An inverse relationship was observed between the dose ingested and the relative absorption with therapeutic doses ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 g, suggesting the involvement of an active, saturable absorption process. Metformin is rapidly distributed following absorption and does not bind to plasma proteins. No metabolites or conjugates of metformin have been identified. The absence of liver metabolism clearly differentiates the pharmacokinetics of metformin from that of other biguanides, such as phenformin. Metformin undergoes renal excretion and has a mean plasma elimination half-life after oral administration of between 4.0 and 8.7 hours. This elimination is prolonged in patients with renal impairment and correlates with creatinine clearance. There are only scarce data on the relationship between plasma metformin concentrations and metabolic effects. Therapeutic levels may be 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L in the fasting state and 1 to 2 mg/L after a meal, but monitoring has little clinical value except when lactic acidosis is suspected or present. Indeed, when lactic acidosis occurs in metformin-treated patients, early determination of the metformin plasma concentration appears to be the best criterion for assessing the involvement of the drug in this acute condition. After confirmation of the diagnosis, treatment should rapidly involve forced diuresis or haemodialysis, both of which favour rapid elimination of the drug. Although serious, lactic acidosis due to metformin is rare and may be minimised by strict adherence to prescribing guidelines and contraindications, particularly the presence of renal failure. Finally, only very few drug interactions have been described with metformin in healthy volunteers. Plasma levels may be reduced by guar gum and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and increased by cimetidine, but no data are yet available in the diabetic population. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical pharmacokinetics of once-daily molsidomine - From immediate-release to prolonged-release once-daily formulations
Herchuelz, André; Carreer-Bruhwyler, Fabienne; Crommen, Jacques ULg et al

in American Journal of Drug Delivery (2004), 2(2), 131-141

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See detailClinical Protection against Caprine Herpesvirus 1 Genital Infection by Intranasal Administration of a Live Attenuated Glycoprotein E Negative Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Vaccine
Thiry, Julien ULg; Tempesta, M.; Camero, M. et al

in BMC Veterinary Research (2007), 3

BACKGROUND: Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) is responsible of systemic diseases in kids and genital diseases leading to abortions in goats. CpHV-1 is widespread and especially in Mediterranean countries as ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) is responsible of systemic diseases in kids and genital diseases leading to abortions in goats. CpHV-1 is widespread and especially in Mediterranean countries as Greece, Italy and Spain. CpHV-1 is antigenically and genetically closely related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1). Taking into account the biological properties shared by these two viruses, we decided in the current study to assess the protection of a live attenuated glycoprotein E (gE) negative BoHV-1 vaccine against a genital CpHV-1 infection in goats. RESULTS: The vaccine was inoculated intranasally twice three weeks apart followed by a subsequent CpHV-1 intravaginal challenge which is the natural route of infection in three goats. To analyse the safety and the efficacy of this marker vaccine, two groups of three goats served as controls: one immunised with a virulent CpHV-1 and one uninoculated until the challenge. Goats were clinically monitored and all sampling procedures were carried out in a blind manner. The vaccine did not induce any undesirable local or systemic reaction and goats did not excrete gE-negative BoHV-1. After challenge, a significant reduction in disease severity was observed in immunised goats. Moreover, goats immunised with either gE-negative BoHV-1 or CpHV-1 exhibited a significant reduction in the length and the peak of viral excretion. Antibodies neutralising both BoHV-1 and CpHV-1 were raised in immunised goats. CONCLUSION: Intranasal application of a live attenuated gE-negative BoHV-1 vaccine is able to afford a clinical protection and a reduction of virus excretion in goats challenged by a CpHV-1 genital infection. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical recognition and aspects of the cerebral folate deficiency syndromes
RAMAEKERS, Vincent ULg; Sequeira, JM; Quadros, EV

in Clinical Chemistry & Laboratory Medicine (2013), 51(3), 497-511

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See detailTHE CLINICAL RELEVANCE OF OFF-LABEL PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY IN ONCO-DERMATOLOGY
WAUTERS, Odile ULg; CAUCANAS, Marie; RICHERT, Bertrand et al

in American Journal of Clinical Dermatology (2010)

Background : Besides actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, as well as superficial and small nodular basal cell carcinoma, aminolevulinic acid and methylaminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT, MAL ... [more ▼]

Background : Besides actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, as well as superficial and small nodular basal cell carcinoma, aminolevulinic acid and methylaminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT, MAL-PDT) present a broad potential of experimental indications in oncologic skin conditions. AIM : To present the various off-label indications with their respective PDT protocols, treatment results, level of evidence (A, B, C, D levels), and potential clinical interest. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A Pubmed search matched PDT with actinic cheilitis, anal, vulvar, and penile intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN, VIN, PIN), verrucous carcinoma, Paget disease, extramammary Paget disease, cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and cutaneous metastases of breast carcinoma. RESULTS : All indications presented interesting complete and partial cures, even in cases faling on previous standard treatments. All publications score C and D levels of evidence. The best PDT outcomes and the lowest recurrence rates concerned unifocal oncologic skin conditions with limited extension. Direct comparison of treatment data was difficult, as PDT protocols were highly variable. Comparative therapeutic trials vs standard care were rarely available. CONCLUSION : PDT represents a valuable treatment alternative in selected off-label oncologic skin conditions. However, literature data are too limited to support a hierarchic treatment position for PDT or a preferential protocol in these specific indications. There is a clear need for clinical trials evaluationg PDT vs standard treatments. In contrast to the approved PDT indications, where clinical evaluation accurately matches histologica evaluation, histology is required in these off- label indications to ensure treatment efficacy. Off-label use of PDT should be measured against the advantages and inconveniencies of standar treatment procedures. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical relevance of pain and function outcomes in glucosamine sulfate long-term trials
Giacovelli, G.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Barbetta, B. et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2005), 13(A), 69

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See detailClinical review: Consensus recommendations on measurement of blood glucose and reporting glycemic control in critically ill adults.
Finfer, Simon; Wernerman, Jan; Preiser, Jean-Charles et al

in Critical Care (2013), 17(3), 229

The management reporting and assessment of glycemic control lacks standardization. The use of different methods to measure the blood glucose concentration and to report the performance of insulin ... [more ▼]

The management reporting and assessment of glycemic control lacks standardization. The use of different methods to measure the blood glucose concentration and to report the performance of insulin treatment yields major disparities and complicates the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials. We convened a meeting of 16 experts plus invited observers from industry to discuss and where possible reach consensus on the most appropriate methods to measure and monitor blood glucose in critically ill patients and on how glycemic control should be assessed and reported. Where consensus could not be reached, recommendations on further research and data needed to reach consensus in the future were suggested. Recognizing their clear conflict of interest, industry observers played no role in developing the consensus or recommendations from the meeting. Consensus recommendations were agreed for the measurement and reporting of glycemic control in clinical trials and for the measurement of blood glucose in clinical practice. Recommendations covered the following areas: How should we measure and report glucose control when intermittent blood glucose measurements are used? What are the appropriate performance standards for intermittent blood glucose monitors in the ICU? Continuous or automated intermittent glucose monitoring - methods and technology: can we use the same measures for assessment of glucose control with continuous and intermittent monitoring? What is acceptable performance for continuous glucose monitoring systems? If implemented, these recommendations have the potential to minimize the discrepancies in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials and to improve glucose control in clinical practice. Furthermore, to be fit for use, glucose meters and continuous monitoring systems must match their performance to fit the needs of patients and clinicians in the intensive care setting. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical risk factors related to failures with zirconia-based restorations: An up to 9-year retrospective study.
Koenig, Vinciane; Vanheusden, Alain ULg; Le Goff, Stephane O. et al

in Journal of dentistry (2013), 41(12), 1164-74

OBJECTIVES: The first objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate zirconia-based restorations (ZBR). The second was to correlate failures with clinical parameters and to identify and to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The first objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate zirconia-based restorations (ZBR). The second was to correlate failures with clinical parameters and to identify and to analyse chipping failures using fractographic analysis. METHODS: 147 ZBR (tooth- and implant-supported crowns and fixed partial dentures (FPDs)) were evaluated after a mean observation period of 41.5+/-31.8 months. Accessorily, zirconia implant abutments (n=46) were also observed. The technical (USPHS criteria) and the biological outcomes of the ZBR were evaluated. Occlusal risk factors were examined: occlusal relationships, parafunctional habits, and the presence of occlusal nightguard. SEM fractographic analysis was performed using the intra-oral replica technique. RESULTS: The survival rate of crowns and FPDs was 93.2%, the success rate was 81.63% and the 9-year Kaplan-Meier estimated success rate was 52.66%. The chipping rate was 15% and the framework fracture rate was 2.7%. Most fractographic analyses revealed that veneer fractures originated from occlusal surface roughness. Several parameters were shown to significantly influence veneer fracture: the absence of occlusal nightguard (p=0.0048), the presence of a ceramic restoration as an antagonist (p=0.013), the presence of parafunctional activity (p=0.018), and the presence of implants as support (p=0.026). The implant abutments success rate was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study confirm that chipping is the first cause of ZBR failure. They also underline the importance of clinical parameters in regards to the explanation of this complex problem. This issue should be considered in future prospective clinical studies. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Practitioners can reduce chipping failures by taking into account several risk parameters, such as the presence of a ceramic restoration as an antagonist, the presence of parafunctional activity and the presence of implants as support. The use of an occlusal nightguard can also decrease failure rate. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical sedation and bispectral index in burn children receiving gamma-hydroxybutyrate.
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; SABOURDIN, Nada et al

in Paediatric Anaesthesia (2012), 22(8), 799-804

Background:  Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) may be an interesting hypnotic agent in burn patients because of its good respiratory or hemodynamic tolerance. However, its clinical and electroencephalographic ... [more ▼]

Background:  Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) may be an interesting hypnotic agent in burn patients because of its good respiratory or hemodynamic tolerance. However, its clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) sedative effects are not yet described in children. The aim of this prospective and randomized study was to assess clinical and EEG effects of increasing intravenous (IV) doses of GHB in burn children requiring sedation for burn wound cares. Methods:  Thirty six children hospitalized in a burn care unit were included and randomly assigned into three groups (G) according to the single IV dose of GHB they received before burn wound care: 10 mg·kg(-1) in G10, 25 mg·kg(-1) in G25, or 50 mg·kg(-1) in G50. All patients received oral premedication (morphine and hydroxyzine) 30 min before GHB injection. Respiratory rate, heart rate, pulse oximetry, and bispectral index (BIS) were continuously monitored. Depth of sedation was clinically assessed using Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation (OAAS) Score, every 2 min until recovery (i.e., OAAS = 4). Results:  Median age was 17.5 [12-34] months. Whatever the dose, BIS decreased after IV GHB. Nadir value of BIS was significantly lower in G25 and G50 than in G10, as was for OAAS score. Nadir values were reached after same delays in G25 and G50. Duration of sedation was dose-dependant. Conclusion:  Bispectral index decreased after GHB injection and was correlated with OAAS score. Deep sedation can be safely achieved with IV doses of 25 or 50 mg·kg(-1) , but the last dose was associated with prolonged duration of clinical sedation. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical sedation and bispectral index in burn children receiving gamma-hydroxybutyrate.
ROUSSEAU, Anne-Françoise ULg; SABOURDIN, Nada; RICHARD, Patrick et al

in European Journal of Anaesthesiology. Supplement (2011), 28(Suppl 48), 150

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See detailClinical sentinel surveillance of equine West Nile fever, Spain
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Alba-Casals, A; Garcia-Bocanegra, I et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (in press)

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See detailClinical severity of knee osteoarthritis poorly predicts long-term radiographic outcomes
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Lejeune, Eric ULg et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2002, September), 46(number 9 (suppl.)), 153

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See detailClinical severity of knee osteoarthritis poorly predicts long-term radiographic outcomes
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Lejeune, Eric ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002, November), 13(Suppl.3), 51

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See detailClinical significance of active myeloperoxidase in carotid atherosclerotic plaques
GACH, Olivier ULg; Magne, Julien ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg et al

in International Journal of Cardiology (2011), 152(1), 149-151

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