Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic mastitis-affected cows display lower lipoxin levels than acute mastitis-affected cows
Boutet, Philippe ULg; Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Degand, Guy ULg et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (2004), 447

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (8 ULg)
Full Text
See detailChronic mastitis-affected cows display lower lipoxin levels than acute mastitis-affected cows
Boutet, Philippe ULg; Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Degand, Guy ULg et al

in Recueil "Le Médecin Vétérinaire du Québec" (2004), 34(1 et 2), 160

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (4 ULg)
See detailChronic measles virus infection of mouse nerve cells in vitro
Rentier, Bernard ULg; Claysmith, A. P.; Dubois-Dalcq, Monique et al

in Bishop, David H. L.; Compans, Richard W. (Eds.) The replication of negative strand viruses : proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Negative Strand Viruses held October 26-November 1, 1980 at Frenchman’s Reef, Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands (1981)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections
Wauters, Odile ULg; Lebas, Eglantine ULg; Nikkels, Arjen ULg

in Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 ULg)
See detailChronic non-cardiac cough in dogs
Clercx, Cécile ULg

in Proceedings of the 35th Annual World Small Animal Veterinary Association Congress (2010, June)

Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can induce reversible cor pulmonale in horses
Amory, Hélène ULg; Christmann, U

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (1999), 19

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic ozone exposure affects leaf senescence of adult beech trees: a chlorophyll fluorescence approach
Gielen, B.; Low, M.; Deckmyn, G. et al

in Journal of Experimental Botany (2007), 58(4), 785-795

Accelerated leaf senescence is one of the harmful effects of elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations ([O-3]) on plants. The number of studies dealing with mature forest trees is scarce however ... [more ▼]

Accelerated leaf senescence is one of the harmful effects of elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations ([O-3]) on plants. The number of studies dealing with mature forest trees is scarce however. Therefore, five 66-year-old beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) have been exposed to twice-ambient (2xambient) [O-3] levels by means of a free-air canopy O-3 exposure system. During the sixth year of exposure, the hypothesis of accelerated leaf senescence in 2xambient [O-3] compared with ambient [O-3] trees was tested for both sun and shade leaves. Chlorophyll (chl) fluorescence was used to assess the photosynthetic quantum yield, and chl fluorescence images were processed to compare functional leaf homogeneity and the proportion of O-3-injured leaf area (stipples) under ambient and 2xambient [O-3] regimes. Based on the analysis of chl fluorescence images, sun leaves of both ambient and 2xambient [O-3] trees had apparently developed typical necrotic O-3 stipples during high O-3 episodes in summer, while accelerated senescence was only observed with sun leaves of 2xambient [O-3] trees. This latter effect was indicated along with a faster decrease of photosynthetic quantum yield, but without evidence of changes in non-photochemical quenching. Overall, treatment effects were small and varied among trees. Therefore, compared with ambient [O-3], the consequence of the observed O-3-induced accelerated leaf senescence for the carbon budget is likely limited. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm manifesting as crural neuropathy.
Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg; SakalihasanN, Natzi ULg; LAVIGNE, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Annals of Vascular Surgery (2001), 15(3), 405-11

Chronic rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) resulting in unusual clinical manifestations can occur if the resistance of structures surrounding the aorta is sufficient to contain hemorrhage. In this ... [more ▼]

Chronic rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) resulting in unusual clinical manifestations can occur if the resistance of structures surrounding the aorta is sufficient to contain hemorrhage. In this report, we describe five cases of chronic ruptured AAA in which the presenting feature was crural neuropathy. All patients were male with a mean age of 74 +/- 1.8 years. At the time of presentation, crural neuropathy had been ongoing for 3 to 9 weeks. In three cases, AAA was not initially suspected because an inadequate clinical examination was performed (not in the vascular surgery department) and because of the small diameter of the aorta in relation to the patient's morphology. Two patients had one episode of hypotension that was wrongly attributed to vagal attack. Abdominal CT scanning was always diagnostic of chronic rupture. In two cases, rupture was associated with erosion of the body of one or more vertebrae and laboratory evidence of inflammation, i.e., increase in sedimentation rate and fibrinogen level. The mean diameter of the AAA was 7.1 +/- 0.9 cm (range 5-10 cm). All patients underwent midline laparotomy, which was performed under emergency conditions in two cases, under semi-emergency conditions in one case, and electively in two cases. Perforation was consistently located on the posterolateral wall of the aorta and varied from 1 to 3 cm in length. Repair was performed using an aortobifemoral prosthesis in four cases, and a straight tube in one case. The patient who underwent emergency surgery died 4 days after the procedure. The remaining four patients recovered uneventfully and were discharged after 10 days. In the elderly, ruptured AAA should be included in the differential diagnosis of crural neuropathy. An episode of hypotension, regardless of its duration, in an elderly patient should be given serious consideration as a possible sign of ruptured AAA with ongoing retroperitoneal hemorrhage. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailChronic septic arthritis of the carpus : Surgical approach
Touati, Kamal ULg; Sartelet, Arnaud ULg

Conference (2008, July 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (13 ULg)
See detailChronic tension-type headache
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Decker, B. C. (Ed.) Chronic daily headaches for clinicians (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (2 ULg)
See detailChronic tension-type headache: a multifactorial analysis suggesting disturbance of "limbic pathways" to the brain stem
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Bottin, D.; Juprelle, M. et al

in Clifford Rose, F. (Ed.) New Advances in Headache Research (1991)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic tension-type headache: what is new?
Fernandez-de-las-Penas, Cesar; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Neurology (2009), 22(3), 254-61

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses current data on nosological boundaries related to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). RECENT FINDINGS ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses current data on nosological boundaries related to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). RECENT FINDINGS: Diagnostic criteria of CTTH should be adapted to improve its sensitivity against migraine. It seems that mechanical pain sensitivity is a consequence and not a causative factor of CTTH. Recent evidence is modifying previous knowledge about relationships between muscle tissues and CTTH, suggesting a potential role of muscle trigger points in the genesis of pain. An updated pain model suggests that headache perception can be explained by referred pain from trigger points in the craniocervical muscles, mediated through the spinal cord and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis rather than only tenderness of the muscles themselves. Different therapeutic strategies, pharmacological, physical therapy, psychological and acupuncture, are generally used. The therapeutic efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs remains incomplete. The tricyclic antidepressants are the most used first-line therapeutic agents for CTTH. Surprisingly, few controlled studies have been performed and not all of them have found an efficacy superior to placebo. Further, there is insufficient evidence to support/refute the efficacy of physical therapy in CTTH. SUMMARY: Although there is an increasing scientific interest in CTTH, future studies incorporating subgroups of patients who will likely to benefit from a specific treatment (clinical prediction rules) should be conducted. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic tolerance to ethanol-induced sedation: Implication for age-related differences in locomotor sensitization
Quoilin, Caroline; Didone, Vincent ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg et al

in Alcohol (2013), 47(4), 317-322

The adolescent brain has been suggested to be particularly sensitive to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations, which in turn could increase the risk of youths for alcohol abuse and dependence. Sensitization to ... [more ▼]

The adolescent brain has been suggested to be particularly sensitive to ethanol-induced neuroadaptations, which in turn could increase the risk of youths for alcohol abuse and dependence. Sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol has often been used as an animal model of ethanol-induced neuroadaptations. Previously, we showed that young mice were more sensitive than adults to the locomotor sensitization induced by high ethanol doses. However, this effect could be due to age-related differences in chronic tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol. The aim of the present study is to assess chronic tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol in weaning 21-day-old (P21), adolescent 35-day-old (P35) and adult 63-day-old (P63) female Swiss mice. After a daily injection of saline or 4 g/kg ethanol during 6 consecutive days, all P21, P35 and P63 mice were injected with 4 g/kg ethanol and submitted to the loss of righting reflex procedure. Our results confirm that the sensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol gradually increases with age. Although this schedule of ethanol injections induces significant age-related differences in ethanol sensitization, it did not reveal significant differences between P21, P35 and P63 mice in the development of a chronic ethanol tolerance to its sedative effects. The present results show that age-related differences in the development of ethanol sensitization cannot be explained by differences in chronic ethanol tolerance to its sedative effects. More broadly, they do not support the idea that ethanol-induced sensitization is a by-product of chronic ethanol tolerance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic Toxicity Of Essential Oils Of 3 Local Aromatic Plants Towards Sitophilus Zeamais Motsch (Coleoptera : Curculionidae)
Ngamo, Tinkeu L.S.; Goudoum, A.; Ngassoum, Martin B. et al

in African Journal of Agricultural Research (2007), 2(4), 164-167

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic varicella-zoster virus skin lesions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus are related to decreased expression of gE and gB
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Rentier, Bernard ULg; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in Journal of Infectious Diseases (1997), 176(1), 261-264

The pathogenesis of chronic, verrucous varicella-zoster virus (VZV) cutaneous lesions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons is unknown. It has been hypothesized that these lesions are due ... [more ▼]

The pathogenesis of chronic, verrucous varicella-zoster virus (VZV) cutaneous lesions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons is unknown. It has been hypothesized that these lesions are due to an altered pattern of virus gene expression. Immediate early and late (L) gene expression in five chronic verrucous VZV lesions, four full-blown herpes zoster vesicular lesions in HIV-infected persons, and eight vesicular herpes zoster lesions in immunocompetent individuals was semiquantitatively assessed immunohistochemically using specific antibodies to the IE63, gE (L), and gB (L) proteins. All patients had evidence of IE63 expression in keratinocytes; however, gE expression was either weak or absent in keratinocytes of three verrucous lesions, and gB was either weak or absent in two. These results suggest that chronic VZV skin lesions are associated with diminished gE and gB expression. It is inferred that the VZV behavior in keratinocytes may vary from a latency-like state to a fully developed, productive infection. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic verrucous varicella zoster virus skin lesions: clinical, histological, molecular and therapeutic aspects
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Snoeck, Robert; Rentier, Bernard ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Dermatology (1999), 24(5), 346-353

The outbreak of HIV infection introduced a new phenomenon in varicella zoster virus (VZV) pathology, namely the long-standing wart-like skin lesions that are frequently associated with resistance to ... [more ▼]

The outbreak of HIV infection introduced a new phenomenon in varicella zoster virus (VZV) pathology, namely the long-standing wart-like skin lesions that are frequently associated with resistance to thymidine kinase (TK)-dependent antiviral agents. This paper reviews the clinical, histological, and molecular aspects and the therapeutic management of these verrucous lesions. The majority of lesions are characterized by chronically evolving, unique or multiple wart-like cutaneous lesions. The main histopathological features include hyperkeratosis, verruciform acanthosis and VZV-induced cytopathic changes with scant or absent cytolysis of infected keratinocytes. The mechanism that establishes the chronic nature of the lesions appears to be associated with a particular pattern of VZV gene expression exhibiting reduced or nondetectable gE and gB synthesis. Drug resistance to TK-dependent antiviral agents is a result of nonfunctional or deficient viral TK. This necessitates alternative therapeutic management using antiviral agents that target the viral DNA polymerase. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronic vertebral osteomyelitis in an adult draft horse
Amory, Hélène ULg; Vandenput, Sandrina ULg; Godisiabois, Y et al

in Proceedings of the XXVth Congress of the World Veterinary Association, Yokohama, Japan (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChronically injured corticospinal axons do not cross large spinal lesion gaps after a multifactorial transplantation strategy using olfactory ensheathing cell/olfactory nerve fibroblast-biomatrix bridges
Deumens, R.; Koopmans, G. C.; Honig, W. M. M. et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (2006), 83(5), 811-820

Transplantation of mixed cultures containing olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) and olfactory nerve fibroblasts (ONF) has been shown to stimulate regrowth of both acutely and chronically injured ... [more ▼]

Transplantation of mixed cultures containing olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) and olfactory nerve fibroblasts (ONF) has been shown to stimulate regrowth of both acutely and chronically injured corticospinal (CS) axons across small spinal cord lesion gaps. Here, we used a multifactorial transplantation strategy to stimulate regrowth of chronically injured CS axons across large spinal cord lesion gaps. This strategy combined the transplantation of aligned OEC/ONF-biomatrix complexes, as described previously (Deumens et al. [2004] Neuroscience 125:591-604), within the lesion gap with additional OEC/ONF injections rostral and caudal to the lesion site. We show an enhanced presence of injured CS axons directly rostral to the lesion gap, with no effects on injured CS axons at or caudal to the lesion gap. Furthermore, injured CS axons did not penetrate the OEC/ONF-biomatrix complex within the lesion gap. The enhanced presence of CS axons rostral to the lesion gap was not accompanied by any recovery of behavioral parameters assessed with the BBB locomotor rating scale or CatWalk gait analysis. We conclude that our multifactorial transplantation strategy should be optimized to create an OEC/ONF continuum in the injured spinal cord and thereby stimulate regrowth of injured CS axons across large spinal lesion gaps. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (3 ULg)