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See detailThe C2-hydrocarbon link in cometary comae
Weiler, M.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Hutsemekers, Damien ULg et al

in EPSC Abstract 2012 (2012)

Comet 8P/Tuttle was the target of an ESO multiwavelength observing campaign in 2008. Observations of the spatial distribution of C2 and C3 were obtained, as well as simultaneous direct detections of the ... [more ▼]

Comet 8P/Tuttle was the target of an ESO multiwavelength observing campaign in 2008. Observations of the spatial distribution of C2 and C3 were obtained, as well as simultaneous direct detections of the C2 parent species C2H2 and C2H6. We combine these observations to investigate the origin of cometary C2. The observed C2 column densities are inconsistent with a production of C2 from C2H2, C2H6, and C3. Based on a photochemical model, we quantitatively discuss the influence of further potential C2 parent species. The assumption of C4H2 as an additional C2 parent species in comet 8P/Tuttle provides the best explanation for the observed C2 column densities. [less ▲]

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See detailC2C and Coll2-1 biomarkers reveal increased type II collagen catabolism in biglycan/fibromodulin double deficient mice
Ameye, LG; DEBERG, Michelle ULg; Oliviera, M et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2006), 14(Suppl B), 61

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See detailC3b receptor (CR1) on erythrocytes and the HLA-DR3 antigen
Malaise, Michel ULg; Desoroux, Aline ULg; Mahieu, P. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (1986), 29(2), 300-301

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See detailC4 plants decline in the Himalayan basin since the Last Glacial Maximum
Galy, Valier; François, Louis ULg; France-Lanord, Christian et al

in Quaternary Science Reviews (2008), 27(13-14), 1396-1409

The Bengal Fan turbiditic system, supplied by the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system, provides an integrated record of Himalayan system erosion. Thanks to minor inputs of marine organic matter and almost ... [more ▼]

The Bengal Fan turbiditic system, supplied by the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system, provides an integrated record of Himalayan system erosion. Thanks to minor inputs of marine organic matter and almost complete preservation of riverine organic carbon, organic matter buried in Bengal Fan sediments is a proxy of Himalayan basin paleo-vegetation. The active channel-levee system of the middle fan documents the last 19 ka and allows the reconstruction of vegetation change in the Himalayan basin since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We measured delta C-13 of organic carbon (C-org) in order to track changes in the proportions of C3 and C4 plants in the Himalayan basin. From LGM to mid-Holocene, delta C-13 of bulk C-org shifts of 3-4%. towards more negative values. Relative abundance of individual n-alkanes reveals that terrestrial higher plant inputs represent a dominant fraction of C-org buried in Bengal Fan sediments. delta C-13 of higher plants biomarkers mimic that of bulk C-org showing that the later can be used as continental paleo-vegetation proxy. delta C-13 negative shift from LGM to mid-Holocene, mostly indicates the transition from a dominant input of C4 plants to a dominant input of C3 plants and therefore reveals that C4 plants were more abundant in the basin under glacial conditions. Vegetation repartition in the basin simulated using the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model is consistent with C-org data. The model indicates a dominance of C4 plants in the Gangetic plain during the LGM while eastern part of the basin remains dominated by C3 plants. The comparison between our data and proxies of regional paleo-climate suggests that the large decline of C4 plants after the LGM was due to combined increase of atmospheric CO2 and humidity levels. Integrated record of Himalayan basin paleo-vegetation suggests more and conditions during the LGM than during the mid-Holocene and agrees with reconstructions of the monsoon indicating stronger SW monsoon during interglacial and stronger NE monsoon during glacial periods. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailÇa plane pour moi: un transport plus économique, plus écologique.
Lurkin, Virginie ULg

Speech/Talk (2014)

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See detailCA1838, A NANOBODY INHIBITING THE METALLO-β-LACTAMASE VIM-4.
Sohier, Jean ULg; Laurent, Clémentine ULg; Pardon, Els et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailCa2+ influx via the platelet P2X1 ion channel contributes to collagen-induced platelet activation.
Hoylaerts, Marc; Oury, Cécile ULg; Toth-Zsamboki, Emese et al

in Haematologica (2002), 87

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See detailCa2+/calmodulin dependent protein kinase regulates GABA activated Cl- current in cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons
Alix, Philippe ULg; Grolleau, F; Hue, B

in Journal of Neurophysiology (2002), 87

We studied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated currents in short-term cultured dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons of cockroach Periplaneta americana using the whole cell patch-clamp technique in ... [more ▼]

We studied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated currents in short-term cultured dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons of cockroach Periplaneta americana using the whole cell patch-clamp technique in symmetrical chloride solutions. All DUM neurons voltage-clamped at -50 mV displayed inward currents (I(GABA)) when 10(-4) M of GABA was applied by pneumatic pressure-ejection pulses. The semi-logarithmic curve of I(GABA) amplitude versus the ejection time yielded a Hill coefficient of 4.0. I(GABA) was chloride (Cl-) because the reversal potential given by the current-voltage (I-V) curve varied according to the value predicted by the Nernst equation for Cl- dependence. In addition, I(GABA) was almost completely blocked by bath application of the chloride channel blockers picrotoxin (PTX) or 3,3-bis(trifluoromethyl)bicyclo-[2,2,1]heptane-2,2-diacarbonitrile (BIDN). The I-V curve for I(GABA) displayed a unexpected biphasic aspect and was best fitted by two linear regressions giving two slope conductances of 35.6 +/- 2.1 and 80.9 +/- 4.1 nS for potentials ranging from 0 to -30 and -30 to -70 mV, respectively. At -50 mV, the current amplitude was decreased by cadmium chloride (CdCl2, 10(-3) M) and calcium-free solution. The semi-logarithmic curve for CdCl2-resistant I(GABA) gave a Hill coefficient of 2.4. Hyperpolarizing voltage step from -50 to -80 mV was known to increase calcium influx through calcium-resting channels. According to this protocol, a significant increase of I(GABA) amplitude was observed. However, this effect was never obtained when the same protocol was applied on cell body pretreated with CdCl2. When the calmodulin blocker N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalene-sulfonamide or the calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase blocker 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-N-methyl-L-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine (KN-62) was added in the pipette solution, I(GABA) amplitude was decreased. Pressure ejection application of the cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) on DUM neuron cell body held at -50 mV, evoked a Cl- inward current which was insensitive to CdCl2. The Hill plot yielded a Hill coefficient of 2.3, and the I-V curve was always linear in the negative potential range with a slope conductance of 32.4 +/- 1.1 nS. These results, similar to those obtained with GABA in the presence of CdCl2 and KN-62, indicated that CACA activated one subtype of GABA receptor. Our study demonstrated that at least two distinct subtypes of Cl--dependent GABA receptors were expressed in DUM neurons, one of which is regulated by an intracellular Ca2+-dependent mechanism via a calcium-dependent protein kinase. The consequences of the modulatory action of Ca2+ in GABA receptors function and their sensitivity to insecticide are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailLa CAAMI dans le système socio-politique belge
Geerkens, Eric ULg

in Coninckx, Daniel; Eelen, Kristoph; Matagne, Geoffroy (Eds.) et al Les 50 ans de la CAAMI (2005)

En Belgique, le champ de l'assurance maladie-invalidité a longtemps été laissé à l'initiative privée (du mouvement ouvrier et plus tardivement du patronat), encouragée par des subsides publics. Ce système ... [more ▼]

En Belgique, le champ de l'assurance maladie-invalidité a longtemps été laissé à l'initiative privée (du mouvement ouvrier et plus tardivement du patronat), encouragée par des subsides publics. Ce système, dit de liberté subsidiée, a favorisé le cloisonnement de la protection sociale, prise en charge par les grandes familles socio-politiques de la société belge. Le passage d'un régime d'assurances sociales, ne couvrant qu'une partie des salariés, à un système de sécurité sociale obligatoire impliquait la couverture des travailleurs qui ne pouvaient ou ne voulaient être assurés par une mutualité à caractère politique. A cette fin, le législateur de 1944-45, inspiré par le Pacte social reprenant lui-même des éléments figurant dans des projets d'avant-guerre, a donc prévu la création d'une caisse publique d'assurance maladie-invalidité, administrée paritairement et à caractère résiduaire. Cette caisse ne pouvait concurrencer les mutualités existantes — elle en était structurellement empêchée, n'offrant pas d'assurance libre et complémentaire et ne pouvant promouvoir ses services —, mais a complété leur action en assurant les catégories sociales les plus faibles ou réfractaires à l'obligation d'assurance. A ce titre, elle s'est durablement inscrite dans le modèle belge de sécurité sociale. [less ▲]

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See detailCabergoline and the risk of valvular lesions in endocrine disease.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Livadariu, E.; Markov, M. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2008), 159(1), 1-5

AIMS: The cardiac valvular risk associated with lower exposure to cabergoline in common endocrine conditions such as hyperprolactinemia is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a cross-sectional ... [more ▼]

AIMS: The cardiac valvular risk associated with lower exposure to cabergoline in common endocrine conditions such as hyperprolactinemia is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a cross-sectional, case-control echocardiographic study to assess the valvular status in 102 subjects receiving cabergoline for endocrine disorders and 51 matched control subjects. Cabergoline treatment ranged from 12 to 228 months, with a cumulative dose of 18-1718 mg. Valvular regurgitation was equally prevalent in both groups and was almost exclusively mild. Two cabergoline-treated subjects had moderate mitral regurgitation; there was no relationship between cabergoline dose and the presence or severity of mitral valve regurgitation (P=NS). Mitral valve tenting area was significantly greater in the cabergoline group when compared with the control subjects (P=0.03). Mitral valve leaflet thickening was observed in 5.9% of cabergoline-treated subjects; no relationship with the cumulative cabergoline dose was found. No patient had aortic or tricuspid valvular restriction. CONCLUSION: No significantly increased risk of clinically relevant cardiac valve disorders was found in subjects treated with long-term cabergoline therapy at the doses used in endocrine practice. While exposure to cabergoline appears to be safe during low-dose long-term therapy, an association with subclinical changes in mitral valve geometry cannot be completely excluded. [less ▲]

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See detailCabergoline for Cushing's disease: a large retrospective multicenter study.
Ferriere, A.; Cortet, C.; Chanson, P. et al

in European Journal of Endocrinology (2017), 176(3), 305-314

OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of cabergoline in Cushing's disease (CD) is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of cabergoline in a large contemporary cohort of ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of cabergoline in Cushing's disease (CD) is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of cabergoline in a large contemporary cohort of patients with CD. DESIGN: We conducted a retrospective multicenter study from thirteen French and Belgian university hospitals. METHODS: Sixty-two patients with CD received cabergoline monotherapy or add-on therapy. Symptom score, biological markers of hypercortisolism and adverse effects were recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-one (40%) of 53 patients who received cabergoline monotherapy had normal urinary free cortisol (UFC) values within 12 months (complete responders), and five of these patients developed corticotropic insufficiency. The fall in UFC was associated with significant reductions in midnight cortisol and plasma ACTH, and with clinical improvement. Compared to other patients, complete responders had similar median baseline UFC (2.0 vs 2.5xULN) and plasma prolactin concentrations but received lower doses of cabergoline (1.5 vs 3.5 mg/week, P < 0.05). During long-term treatment (>12 months), cabergoline was withdrawn in 28% of complete responders because of treatment escape or intolerance. Overall, sustained control of hypercortisolism was obtained in 23% of patients for 32.5 months (19-105). Nine patients on steroidogenesis inhibitors received cabergoline add-on therapy for 19 months (1-240). Hypercortisolism was controlled in 56% of these patients during the first year of treatment with cabergoline at 1.0 mg/week (0.5-3.5). CONCLUSIONS: About 20-25% of CD patients are good responders to cabergoline therapy allowing long-term control of hypercortisolism at relatively low dosages and with acceptable tolerability. No single parameter, including the baseline UFC and prolactin levels, predicted the response to cabergoline. [less ▲]

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See detailCabergoline in prolactinomen.
Abs, R.; Verhaert, G.; Demez, Pierre ULg et al

in Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde (1995), 51

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See detailCabergoline in the treatment of acromegaly: a study in 64 patients.
Abs, Roger; Verhelst, Johan; Maiter, Dominique et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1998), 83(2), 374-8

Cabergoline is a new, long acting, dopamine agonist that is more effective and better tolerated than bromocriptine in patients with hyperprolactinemia. Because dopamine agonists still have a place in the ... [more ▼]

Cabergoline is a new, long acting, dopamine agonist that is more effective and better tolerated than bromocriptine in patients with hyperprolactinemia. Because dopamine agonists still have a place in the medical management of acromegaly, cabergoline might be a useful treatment. We, therefore, evaluated the effect of long term administration of cabergoline in a large group of unselected acromegalic patients. Sixty-four patients were included in a multicenter, prospective, open labeled study. A subgroup of 16 patients had GH-/PRL-cosecreting pituitary adenomas. Cabergoline was started at a dose of 1.0 mg/week and was gradually increased until normalization of plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels, occurrence of unacceptable side-effects, or a maximal weekly dose of 3.5 mg (7.0 mg in 1 case) was reached. Treatment with cabergoline suppressed plasma IGF-I below 300 micrograms/L in 39% of cases and between 300-450 micrograms/L in another 28%. With pretreatment plasma IGF-I concentrations less than 750 micrograms/L, a suppression of IGF-I below 300 micrograms/L was obtained in 53% of cases, and a suppression between 300-450 micrograms/L was obtained in another 32%. By contrast, with pretreatment plasma IGF-I concentrations above 750 micrograms/L, only 17% of cases showed a suppression of IGF-I below 300 micrograms/L, and there was IGF-I suppression between 300-450 micrograms/L in another 21%. In GH-/PRL-cosecreting adenomas, 50% of cases suppressed plasma IGF-I levels below 300 micrograms/L, and another 31% did so between 300-450 micrograms/L, in contrast to only 35% and 27%, respectively in GH-secreting adenomas. Similar results were obtained concerning the secretion of GH. Tumor shrinkage was demonstrated in 13 of 21 patients, with a mass reduction by more than half in 5 GH-/PRL-cosecreting adenomas. Except for slight gastrointestinal discomfort and orthostatic hypotension in a few patients at the beginning of therapy, cabergoline treatment was well tolerated. Only 2 patients stopped medication because of nausea. The weekly dose of cabergoline ranged between 1.0-1.75 mg. A further increase in the dose was only effective in 1 GH-/PRL-cosecreting adenoma. The results of this study suggest that cabergoline is an effective, well tolerated therapy that should be considered in the management of acromegaly, especially if the pituitary adenoma cosecretes GH and PRL or if pretreatment plasma IGF-I levels are below 750 micrograms/L. [less ▲]

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See detailCabergoline in the treatment of Hyoerprolactinemia : A study in 455 patients
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Maiter, D. et al

in 9th Meeting and workshop of the European Neuroendocrine Association - Abstract book (1999)

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See detailCabergoline in the treatment of hyperprolactinemia: a study in 455 patients.
Verhelst, Johan; Abs, Roger; Maiter, Dominique et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1999), 84(7), 2518-22

Cabergoline is a new long-acting dopamine agonist that is very effective and well tolerated in patients with pathological hyperprolactinemia. The aim of this study was to examine, in a very large number ... [more ▼]

Cabergoline is a new long-acting dopamine agonist that is very effective and well tolerated in patients with pathological hyperprolactinemia. The aim of this study was to examine, in a very large number of hyperprolactinemic patients, the ability to normalize PRL levels with cabergoline, to determine the effective dose and tolerance, and to assess the effect on clinical symptoms, tumor shrinkage, and visual field abnormalities. We also evaluated the effects of cabergoline in a large subgroup of patients with bromocriptine intolerance or -resistance. We retrospectively reviewed the files of 455 patients (102 males and 353 females) with pathological hyperprolactinemia treated with cabergoline in 9 Belgian centers. Among these patients, 41% had a microadenoma; 42%, a macroadenoma; 16%, idiopathic hyperprolactinemia; and 1%, an empty sella. The median pretreatment serum PRL level was 124 microg/L (range, 16-26,250 microg/L). A subgroup of 292 patients had previously been treated with bromocriptine, of which 140 showed bromocriptine intolerance and 58 showed bromocriptine resistance. Treatment with cabergoline normalized serum PRL levels in 86% of all patients: in 92% of 244 patients with idiopathic hyperprolactinemia or a microprolactinoma and in 77% of 181 macroadenomas. Pretreatment visual field abnormalities normalized in 70% of patients, and tumor shrinkage was seen in 67% of cases. Side effects were noted in 13% of patients, but only 3.9% discontinued therapy because of side effects. The median dose of cabergoline at the start of therapy was 1.0 mg/week but could be reduced to 0.5 mg/week once control was achieved. Patients with a macroprolactinoma needed a higher median cabergoline dose, compared with those with idiopathic hyperprolactinemia or a microprolactinoma: 1.0 mg/week vs. 0.5 mg/week, although a large overlap existed between these groups. Twenty-seven women treated with cabergoline became pregnant, and 25 delivered a healthy child. One patient had an intended abortion and another a miscarriage. In the patients with bromocriptine intolerance, normalization of PRL was reached in 84% of cases, whereas in the bromocriptine-resistant patients, PRL could be normalized in 70%. We confirmed, in a large-scale retrospective study, the high efficacy and tolerability of cabergoline in the treatment of pathological hyperprolactinemia, leaving few patients with unacceptable side effects or inadequate clinical response. Patients with idiopathic hyperprolactinemia or a microprolactinoma, on average, needed only half the dose of cabergoline as those with macroprolactinomas and have a higher chance of obtaining PRL normalization. Cabergoline also normalized PRL in the majority of patients with known bromocriptine intolerance or -resistance. Once PRL secretion was adequately controlled, the dose of cabergoline could often be significantly decreased, which further reduced costs of therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailCabergoline, a new long-acting dopamine agonist, in the treatment of acromegaly
Abs, R.; Verhelst, J.; Verbessem, G. et al

in 10th international Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1996)

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See detailUna Cabeza Bien Hecha O Una Cabeza Repleta ?
Crahay, Marcel ULg

in Perspectivas (1996), XXVI(1),

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See detailCabinet de curiosités
Nazé, Yaël ULg

Article for general public (2012)

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See detailCabinet de curiosités contemporains : de l'oeuvre au musée
Bawin, Julie ULg

Conference (2017, March 15)

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