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See detailLa cave de la villa gallo-romaine de Neuville "Les Machenées" (Philippeville, province de Namur, Belgique) : étude du matériel archéologique
Cattelain, Laureline; Venant, Nelly; Cosyns, Peter et al

in Archeo-Situla (2013), 32-33

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See detailCAVEAT: technique and tool for computer aided verification and transformation
Gribomont, Pascal ULg; Rossetto, Didier

in Computer Aided Verification (1995)

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See detailCaveolin plays a central role in endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and homing in SDF-1-driven postischemic vasculogenesis.
SBAA, E; DE WEVER, J; MARTINIVE, Philippe ULg et al

in Circulation Research (2006), 98(9), 121927

When neovascularization is triggered in ischemic tissues, angiogenesis but also (postnatal) vasculogenesis is induced, the latter requiring the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) from the ... [more ▼]

When neovascularization is triggered in ischemic tissues, angiogenesis but also (postnatal) vasculogenesis is induced, the latter requiring the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) from the bone marrow. Caveolin, the structural protein of caveolae, was recently reported to directly influence the angiogenic process through the regulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/nitric oxide pathway. In this study, using caveolin-1 null mice (Cav(-/-)), we examined whether caveolin was also involved in the EPC recruitment in a model of ischemic hindlimb. Intravenous infusion of Sca-1(+) Lin(-) progenitor cells, but not bone marrow transplantation, rescued the defective neovascularization in Cav(-/-) mice, suggesting a defect in progenitor mobilization. The adhesion of Cav(-/-) EPC to bone marrow stromal cells indeed appeared to be resistant to the otherwise mobilizing SDF-1 (Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1) exposure because of a defect in the internalization of the SDF-1 cognate receptor CXCR4. Symmetrically, the attachment of Cav(-/-) EPC to SDF-1-presenting endothelial cells was significantly increased. Finally, EPC transduction with caveolin small interfering RNA reproduced this advantage in vitro and, importantly, led to a more extensive rescue of the ischemic hindlimb after intravenous infusion (versus sham-transfected EPC). These results underline the critical role of caveolin in ensuring the caveolae-mediated endocytosis of CXCR4, regulating both the SDF-1-mediated mobilization and peripheral homing of progenitor cells in response to ischemia. In particular, a transient reduction in caveolin expression was shown to therapeutically increase the engraftment of progenitor cells. [less ▲]

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See detailcaveolin-1 expression is critical for VEGF-induced inschemic hindlimb collateralization and NO-mediated angiogenisis.
Martinive, Philippe ULg; Sonveaux, P; DeWever, J et al

in Circulation Research (2004), (95 (2)), 154-61

Nitric oxide (NO) is a powerful angiogenic mediator acting downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and the VEGFR-2 receptor colocalize in caveolae ... [more ▼]

Nitric oxide (NO) is a powerful angiogenic mediator acting downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and the VEGFR-2 receptor colocalize in caveolae. Because the structural protein of these signaling platforms, caveolin, also represses eNOS activity, changes in its abundance are likely to influence the angiogenic process in various ways. In this study, we used mice deficient for the caveolin-1 gene (Cav-/-) to examine the impact of caveolae suppression in a model of adaptive angiogenesis obtained after femoral artery resection. Evaluation of the ischemic tissue perfusion and histochemical analyses revealed that contrary to Cav+/+ mice, Cav-/- mice failed to recover a functional vasculature and actually lost part of the ligated limbs, thereby recapitulating the effects of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME administered to operated Cav+/+ mice. We also isolated endothelial cells (ECs) from Cav-/- aorta and showed that on VEGF stimulation, NO production and endothelial tube formation were dramatically abrogated when compared with Cav+/+ ECs. The Ser1177 eNOS phosphorylation and Thr495 dephosphorylation but also the ERK phosphorylation were similarly altered in VEGF-treated Cav-/- ECs. Interestingly, caveolin transfection in Cav-/- ECs redirected the VEGFR-2 in caveolar membranes and restored the VEGF-induced ERK and eNOS activation. However, when high levels of recombinant caveolin were reached, VEGF exposure failed to activate ERK and eNOS. These results emphasize the critical role of caveolae in ensuring the coupling between VEGFR-2 stimulation and downstream mediators of angiogenesis. This study also provides new insights to understand the paradoxical roles of caveolin (eg, repressing basal enzyme activity but facilitating activation on agonist stimulation) in cardiovascular pathophysiology. [less ▲]

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See detailLa cavernostomie: une ancienne technique parfois efficace dans le traitement des abcès pulmonaires
Defraigne, Jean-Olivier ULg; Siquet, J.; Limet, Raymond ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1997), 52(7), 498-501

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See detailCavernous hemangiosarcoma in a free-living red deer (Cervus elaphus)
Grégoire, Fabien ULg; Mousset, Bénédicte ULg; Hanrez, David ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2008), 162

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See detailCB1 receptor blockade and its impact on cardiometabolic risk factors: overview of the RIO programme with rimonabant.
Scheen, André ULg

in Journal of Neuroendocrinology (2008), 20 Suppl 1

Rimonabant, the first selective CB(1) receptor antagonist in clinical use, has been extensively investigated in the Rimonabant in Obesity (RIO) programme, comprising four 1-2 year placebo-controlled ... [more ▼]

Rimonabant, the first selective CB(1) receptor antagonist in clinical use, has been extensively investigated in the Rimonabant in Obesity (RIO) programme, comprising four 1-2 year placebo-controlled randomised clinical trials recruiting more than 6600 overweight/obese patients with or without co-morbidities. Rimonabant 20 mg daily consistently reduced body weight, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood pressure, insulin resistance and C-reactive protein levels, and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations in both non-diabetic and type-2 diabetic overweight/obese patients. Adiponectin levels were increased, an effect that correlated with HDL cholesterol augmentation, while small dense LDL cholesterol levels were decreased in patients receiving rimonabant 20 mg compared with those receiving placebo in RIO Lipids. Furthermore, in RIO Diabetes, a 0.7% reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was observed in metformin- or sulphonylurea-treated patients with type-2 diabetes, an effect recently confirmed in the 6-month SERENADE (Study Evaluating Rimonabant Efficacy in drug-NAive DiabEtic patients) trial in drug-naive diabetic patients. Almost half of metabolic changes occurred beyond weight loss, in agreement with direct peripheral effects. The positive effects observed after 1 year were maintained after 2 years. Rimonabant was generally well-tolerated, but with a slightly higher incidence of depressed mood disorders, anxiety, nausea and dizziness compared with placebo. In clinical practice, rimonabant has to be prescribed to the right patient, i.e. overweight/obese subjects with cardiometabolic risk factors and with no major depressive illness and/or ongoing antidepressive treatment, in order to both maximise efficacy and minimise safety issues. New trials are supposed to confirm the potential role of rimonabant in patients with abdominal adiposity, atherogenic dyslipidaemia and/or type-2 diabetes, i.e. at high cardiometabolic risk. [less ▲]

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See detailCBP and histone deacetylase inhibition enhance the transactivation potential of the HOXB7 homeodomain-containing protein
Chariot, Alain ULg; Van Lint, Carine; Chapelier, Muriel et al

in Oncogene (1999), 18

Homeodomain-containing proteins are transcription factors regulating the coordinated expression of multiple target genes involved in development, differentiation and cellular transformation. In this study ... [more ▼]

Homeodomain-containing proteins are transcription factors regulating the coordinated expression of multiple target genes involved in development, differentiation and cellular transformation. In this study, we demonstrated that HOXB7, one member of this family, behaved as a transactivator in breast cancer cells. Deletion of either the HOXB7 N-terminal domain or the C-terminal acidic tail abolished this transcriptional effect, suggesting a combination of distinct functional transactivating domains. HOXB7 physically interacted both in vitro and in vivo with the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). This interaction led to an enhanced transactivating potential and required the N-terminal of HOXB7 as well as two domains located at the C-terminal part of CBP. Moreover, trichostatin A, a deacetylase inhibitor, strongly enhanced the transcriptional properties of HOXB7. Our data therefore indicate that HOX proteins can directly interact with CBP and that acetylation/deacetylation may regulate their transcriptional properties. [less ▲]

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See detailA Cbx8-containing polycomb complex facilitates the transition to gene activation during ES cell differentiation.
Creppe, Catherine ULg; Palau, Ana; Malinverni, Roberto et al

in PLoS genetics (2014), 10(12), 1004851

Polycomb proteins play an essential role in maintaining the repression of developmental genes in self-renewing embryonic stem cells. The exact mechanism allowing the derepression of polycomb target genes ... [more ▼]

Polycomb proteins play an essential role in maintaining the repression of developmental genes in self-renewing embryonic stem cells. The exact mechanism allowing the derepression of polycomb target genes during cell differentiation remains unclear. Our project aimed to identify Cbx8 binding sites in differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells. Therefore, we used a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation of endogenous Cbx8 coupled to direct massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq). Our analysis identified 171 high confidence peaks. By crossing our data with previously published microarray analysis, we show that several differentiation genes transiently recruit Cbx8 during their early activation. Depletion of Cbx8 partially impairs the transcriptional activation of these genes. Both interaction analysis, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments support the idea that activating Cbx8 acts in the context of an intact PRC1 complex. Prolonged gene activation results in eviction of PRC1 despite persisting H3K27me3 and H2A ubiquitination. The composition of PRC1 is highly modular and changes when embryonic stem cells commit to differentiation. We further demonstrate that the exchange of Cbx7 for Cbx8 is required for the effective activation of differentiation genes. Taken together, our results establish a function for a Cbx8-containing complex in facilitating the transition from a Polycomb-repressed chromatin state to an active state. As this affects several key regulatory differentiation genes this mechanism is likely to contribute to the robust execution of differentiation programs. [less ▲]

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See detailCCCP, une guerre stellaire plutot chaude - résumé
Nazé, Yaël ULg

Article for general public (2011)

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See detailCCD Detection of beam-foil light
Quevrin, A.; Bastin, Thierry ULg; Dumont, Paul-Dominique ULg et al

Poster (1999)

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See detailCCDC39 is required for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex and for normal ciliary motility in humans and dogs.
Merveille, Anne-Christine ULg; Davis, Erica E; Becker-Heck, Anita et al

in Nature Genetics (2011), 43(1), 72-8

Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, reduced fertility in males and situs inversus in about 50% of ... [more ▼]

Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, reduced fertility in males and situs inversus in about 50% of affected individuals (Kartagener syndrome). It is caused by motility defects in the respiratory cilia that are responsible for airway clearance, the flagella that propel sperm cells and the nodal monocilia that determine left-right asymmetry. Recessive mutations that cause PCD have been identified in genes encoding components of the outer dynein arms, radial spokes and cytoplasmic pre-assembly factors of axonemal dyneins, but these mutations account for only about 50% of cases of PCD. We exploited the unique properties of dog populations to positionally clone a new PCD gene, CCDC39. We found that loss-of-function mutations in the human ortholog underlie a substantial fraction of PCD cases with axonemal disorganization and abnormal ciliary beating. Functional analyses indicated that CCDC39 localizes to ciliary axonemes and is essential for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex. [less ▲]

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See detailThe CCK(-like) receptor in the animal kingdom: functions, evolution and structures.
Staljanssens, Dorien; Azari, Elnaz Karimian; Christiaens, Olivier et al

in Peptides (2011), 32(3), 607-19

In this review, the cholecystokinin (CCK)(-like) receptors throughout the animal kingdom are compared on the level of physiological functions, evolutionary basis and molecular structure. In vertebrates ... [more ▼]

In this review, the cholecystokinin (CCK)(-like) receptors throughout the animal kingdom are compared on the level of physiological functions, evolutionary basis and molecular structure. In vertebrates, the CCK receptor is an important member of the G-protein coupled receptors as it is involved in the regulation of many physiological functions like satiety, gastrointestinal motility, gastric acid secretion, gall bladder contraction, pancreatic secretion, panic, anxiety and memory and learning processes. A homolog for this receptor is also found in nematodes and arthropods, called CK receptor and sulfakinin (SK) receptor, respectively. These receptors seem to have evolved from a common ancestor which is probably still closely related to the nematode CK receptor. The SK receptor is more closely related to the CCK receptor and seems to have similar functions. A molecular 3D-model for the CCK receptor type 1 has been built together with the docking of the natural ligands for the CCK and SK receptors in the CCK receptor type 1. These molecular models can help to study ligand-receptor interactions, that can in turn be useful in the development of new CCK(-like) receptor agonists and antagonists with beneficial health effects in humans or potential for pest control. [less ▲]

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See detailCCL2 as a serum biomarker of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in dogs
Krafft, Emilie ULg; Roels, Elodie ULg; Heikkila, H.P. et al

in Proceedings of 22nd ECVIM Meeting - Masstricht, Netherlands (2012, September)

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See detailCCL2 as a serum biomarker of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in dogs
Krafft, Emilie ULg; Roels, Elodie ULg; Heikkilä, H.P. et al

Poster (2012, October 19)

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See detailCd, Cu and Zn uptake by sukfate reducing bacteria in an upflow fixed bed reactor
Crine, Michel ULg; Baldewijns, Jean-Michel; Schlitz, Marc et al

Poster (1988, July 17)

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See detailThe CD-Rom's in the Medical Library : an 8 year Follow-up Evaluation.
Pasleau, Françoise ULg; Quinaux, N.; Severyns, A.-M. et al

Poster (1996, September)

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See detailCD10 expression by fusiform stromal cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma correlates with tumor progression
Braham, Hend; Trimeche, Mounir; Ziadi, Sonia et al

in Virchows Archiv : An International Journal of Pathology (2006), 449(2), 220-224

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)