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See detailChemical abundances of fast-rotating OB stars
Cazorla, Constantin ULg; Morel, Thierry ULg; Nazé, Yaël ULg et al

in Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union - New windows on massive stars: asteroseismology, interferometry, and spectropolarimetry (2015)

Fast rotation in massive stars is predicted to induce mixing in their interior, but a population of fast-rotating stars with normal nitrogen abundances at their surface has recently been revealed (Hunter ... [more ▼]

Fast rotation in massive stars is predicted to induce mixing in their interior, but a population of fast-rotating stars with normal nitrogen abundances at their surface has recently been revealed (Hunter et al. 2009; Brott et al. 2011, but see Maeder et al. 2014). However, as the binary fraction of these stars is unknown, no definitive statements about the ability of single-star evolutionary models including rotation to reproduce these observations can be made. Our work combines for the first time a detailed surface abundance analysis with a radial-velocity monitoring for a sample of bright, fast-rotating Galactic OB stars to put strong constraints on stellar evolutionary and interior models. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical analyses of the seeds from Prunella vulgaris: A chemotaxonomic approach
Paul, Aman ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Cieckiewicz, Ewa ULg et al

Poster (2014, April)

Common self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) plants are traditionally sown along the border of crops to enhance the biodiversity. Besides enhancing the biodiversity, they can also be a source of interesting ... [more ▼]

Common self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) plants are traditionally sown along the border of crops to enhance the biodiversity. Besides enhancing the biodiversity, they can also be a source of interesting compounds which could be important for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. The seeds of Common Yarrow were investigated for proteins, fatty acid compositions and polyphenolic compounds. The protein content was analyzed according to Dumas method, the extraction of oil was done using a cold extraction technique employing 2:1 chloroform/methanol as solvent, the fatty acid composition was determined using the gas chromatography and the amount of polyphenolic compounds were estimated using the method as described in European Pharmacopoeia, 8th edition. Common self-heal seeds can be of great commercial importance. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical anatomy of the spinal cord
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Neurologic Clinics (1991), 9

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See detailChemical and biological evaluation of the nutritive value of Algerian green seaweed Ulva lactuca using in vitro gas production technique fior ruminant animals
Zitouni, Hind; Arhab, Rabah; Boudry, Christelle ULg et al

in International Journal of Advanced Research (2014), 2(4), 916-925

This study aimed to determine the nutritive value of seaweed Ulva lactuca collected from the Algerian coast by estimation of its chemical composition and fermentation characteristics, comparatively to ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to determine the nutritive value of seaweed Ulva lactuca collected from the Algerian coast by estimation of its chemical composition and fermentation characteristics, comparatively to vetch-oat hay (control), using in vitro gas production technique. Seaweed and control were incubated with rumen liquor taken from fistulated and non lactating cows. Gas production was recorded at: 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72h. The in vitro rumen fermentation parameters were measured after 24h and 72h of fermentation. Proteins degradability was investigated by the enzymatic technique using a protease extracted from Streptomyces griseus. The results showed a wide variation between the chemical components of seaweed and conventional fodder used as control. The main constituents in Ulva lactuca were ashes (39.1% DM), fibers (22.8 % DM) and proteins (15.3% DM). The gas production profile of seaweed during 72h of incubation showed a slow and low gas production. Cumulative gas production obtained after 24h for seaweed (42 ml/g OM) was significantly lower than control (128.4 ml/g OM) (P<0.001). pH, ammonia, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), apparent digestibility of dry matter (DDM), organic matter digestibility (OMD) and metabolizable energy (ME) were significantly different between seaweed and vetch-oat hay (6.86, 290.1 mg/ml, 1.25 mmol/g DM, 38.3%, 29.2%, 3.81MJ/Kg DM respectively for seaweed). Protein degradability measurement indicates the weak hydrolysis of seaweed crude protein which is beneficial for ruminants. This study showed that the use of Ulva lactuca as non conventional feed in ruminant nutrition can be considered under certain conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical and biological investigations of a toxic plant from Central Africa, Magnistipula butayei subsp montana
Karangwa, Charles; Esters, Virginie ULg; Frederich, Michel et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2006), 103(3), 433-438

Magnistipida butayei subsp. montana (Chrysobalanaceae) is known, in the Great Lakes Region, to possess toxicological properties. In this paper, we investigated the acute toxicity (dose levels 50-1600 mg ... [more ▼]

Magnistipida butayei subsp. montana (Chrysobalanaceae) is known, in the Great Lakes Region, to possess toxicological properties. In this paper, we investigated the acute toxicity (dose levels 50-1600 mg/kg) of its aqueous extract, administered orally to adult Wistar rats. This study demonstrated that the freeze-dried aqueous extract (5%, w/w) possesses high toxicity. The extract caused hypothermia, neurological disorders, including extensor reflex of maximal convulsive induced-seizures at about 2h after the administered dose, and death occurred (LD50 = 370 mg/kg) in a dose dependent manner. Blood parameter evaluation revealed slight variations, but these might not have clinical relevance. Histological examination of internal organs (lungs, liver, heart and kidneys) did not reveal any abnormality in the treated group compared to the control. Therefore, it can be concluded that Magnistipida butayei subsp. montana aqueous extract, given orally, is toxic and that its target is the central nervous system. General phytochemical screening revealed that the plant did not contain significant amounts of products known to be toxic, such as alkaloids or cardioactive glycosides, but only catechic tannins, amino acids, saponins and other aphrogen principles in the three parts of the species (fruit, leave and bark). (c) 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical and enzymatical modifications of sugar derived from lignocellulose
Richard, Gaetan ULg; Laurent, Pascal ULg; Nott, Katherine ULg et al

Poster (2009, January)

Actually, biorefinery is increasingly considered as a promising alternative to petroleum chemistry, since it aims at not only the replacement of fossil energy but also the development of chemicals from ... [more ▼]

Actually, biorefinery is increasingly considered as a promising alternative to petroleum chemistry, since it aims at not only the replacement of fossil energy but also the development of chemicals from biomass, with applications such as detergents, phytopharmaceutics, solvents, plastics, etc. The valorisation of carbohydrates from renewable raw materials is currently the subject of numerous researches. In this context, the synthesis of new surfactants derived from the sugars issued from the lignocellulose hydrolysis was undertaken by chemical or enzymatic routes. In this poster, the examples of glucose, cellobiose and uronic acids will be discussed. Whatever the way used, the reaction conditions (use of a catalyst, protection/deprotection steps, type of solvent, presence of co-solvent, reactant concentrations, etc) were optimized to yield a panel of carbohydrate derivatives (some examples of the structures obtained are given above). These differ by the nature of the alkyl chain (in length and in degree of saturation), the type of chemical bond (amide, ester, thioester, acetal), and the position of substitution. The impact of these differences on the techno-functional properties of these modified sugars will be evaluated. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical and physical factors involved in the aggregation behaviour of Harmonia axyridis Pallas
Durieux, Delphine ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis et al

Conference (2011, July 27)

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See detailThe chemical biomarkers C2C, Coll2-1, and Coll2-1NO(2) provide complementary information on type II collagen catabolism in healthy and osteoarthritic mice
Ameye, L. G.; Deberg, Michelle ULg; Oliveira, M. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2007), 56(10), 3336-3346

Objective. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, biglycan/fibromodulin double-deficient mice develop severe knee osteoarthritis. We undertook this study to compare type 11 collagen catabolism in the 2 ... [more ▼]

Objective. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, biglycan/fibromodulin double-deficient mice develop severe knee osteoarthritis. We undertook this study to compare type 11 collagen catabolism in the 2 genotypes and to compare the usefulness of 3 biomarkers of collagen degradation (C2C [also known as Col23/4C(long mono)] as well as the peptide Coll2-1 and its nitrated form, Coll2-1NO(2)) for evaluating collagen catabolism in vivo. Methods. In 15 WT mice and 15 biglycan/ fibromodulin double-deficient mice, we determined serum levels of C2C at ages 66 and 141 days, and we determined serum levels of Coll2-1 and Coll2-1NO(2) at ages 49, 81, 95, and 141 days. Expression of the biomarkers in knee sections was examined using immunohistochemistry. Results. The mean concentrations of C2C and Coll2-1 were higher in biglycan/fibromodulin double-deficient mice at all time points. For C2C and Coll2-1, the ratio of the serum concentration in biglycan/ fibromodulin double-deficient mice to that in WT mice (the double-deficient:WT ratio) was constant over time and was similar to 1.63 and similar to 1.15, respectively. In contrast, the double-deficient:WT ratio for Coll2-1NO(2) varied and, depending on age, was >1 or <1. No significant correlation was found between the expression of the different biomarkers, except for a weak, negative correlation between Coll2-1NO(2) and C2C. In both genotypes, antibodies to each biomarker labeled some fibroblasts in the tendons and menisci as well as chondrocytes above the tidemark in articular cartilage. Growth plates were unstained. For each biomarker, extracellular staining was limited to fibrocartilage areas in the tendons and menisci in all mice and was limited to some focal lesions of the cartilage in biglyean/fibromodulin double-deficient mice. Conclusion. The different double-deficient:WT ratios observed with C2C, Coll2-1, and Coll2-1NO(2) in the absence of any correlation between the expression of the 3 biomarkers indicate that these biomarkers give complementary, rather than redundant, information about in vivo type 11 collagen catabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical changes and influences of rapeseed antinutritional factors on gestating and lactating ewes 1. Animal performances and plasma hormones and glucose
Mandiki, S. N. M.; Derycke, G.; Bister, J. L. et al

in Animal Feed Science & Technology (2002), 98(1-2), 25-35

An experiment was carried out in order to study the effects of high levels of low-glucosinolates (LG)-rapeseed meal of two varieties (Apex or Synergy) on ewes and lambs performances and circulating ... [more ▼]

An experiment was carried out in order to study the effects of high levels of low-glucosinolates (LG)-rapeseed meal of two varieties (Apex or Synergy) on ewes and lambs performances and circulating hormones (progesterone-P4, estradiol-E2,-prolactin-PRL, cortisol, insulin, tri-iodothyronin-T3, thyroxin-T4) and glucose. On the 100th day of gestation, 90 ewes bearing at least two foetuses were divided into 3 groups. Control, Apex and Synergy groups received concentrates with 0, 40 and 40% of LG-rapeseed meal obtained with either Apex (13.77 mumol of glucosinolates/g DM seed) or Synergy (18.19 mumol) variety. Apart from the distribution of pasture hay ad libitum, the ewes received 500 and 1200 g of concentrates/animal per day during gestation and lactation, respectively. Concentrates were offered till the 47th day of lactation, and thereafter, the ewes were fed only with hay during 3 weeks. The lambs received ad libitum concentrates without rapeseed meal from 10 days of age till slaughtering. They were weaned at 65 days of age and were slaughtered when their fattening state was optimal. The performances of ewes (food intake and liveweight profiles) and of lambs (birth liveweight, mortality at birth, weight gains, slaughtering parameters) were not reduced by 40% of LG-rapeseed meal except a decrease in the liveweight for ewes in the Apex group after lambing. The profiles and levels of plasma metabolic (T3, T4, cortisol, insulin) and reproductive (PRL, P4) hormones were not modified by the rapeseed meal. In contrast, the estradiol concentration was lower (P < 0.05) in the two groups of ewes which received rapeseed meal than in the controls as an index of an eventual disturbance in the reproductive functions. In conclusion, large amounts of LG-rapeseed meal may be used as protein supplement in the diet of ewes at the end of gestation and during lactation without negative effects on animal performances and physiology. (c( 2002 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical changes and influences of rapeseed antinutritional factors on lamb physiology and performance - 1. Animal performance and thyroid histology
Derycke, G.; Mabon, N.; Mandiki, S. N. M. et al

in Animal Feed Science & Technology (1999), 81(1-2), 81-91

Sixty six Texel, Suffolk or crossbred lambs allocated to three groups were used. From the end of their first month of age till slaughtering, they were fed ad libitum with concentrates containing 0 ... [more ▼]

Sixty six Texel, Suffolk or crossbred lambs allocated to three groups were used. From the end of their first month of age till slaughtering, they were fed ad libitum with concentrates containing 0% (Control) or 25% of rapeseed meal obtained from either Samourai (Samourai) or Honk (Honk) variety. The Samourai and Honk concentrates contained 1.95 and 4.22 mmoles/g DM of glucosinolates, respectively. Lambs were weaned at 88 +/- 8 days of age and 24 +/- 5 kg of live weight and were slaughtered when their fattening state was estimated to be optimal. Apart from low concentrate intake for suckling lambs at the beginning of the experiment in the Honk, no negative effect of low glucosinolates (LG)-rapeseed meal was noted concerning animal performance. The quality of perirenal fat was better for lambs which received rapeseed meal since lower (P < 0.5) proportions of saturated fatty acids (C-10 : 0, C-12 : 0, C-14 : 0) and higher contents (P < 0.05) of some unsaturated fatty acids (C-18 : 1trans, C-22 : 2) were determined. The thyroid weight was significantly higher (P < 0.05) for the Honk (3.04 +/- 0.8 g) than in the Control (2.6 +/- 0.5 g) and the Samourai (2.7 +/- 0.6 g). Moreover, the percentages of small thyroid follicles were lower (P < 0.05) in the Honk than in the Control and Samourai groups. Conversely, the percentages of large thyroid follicles were higher (P < 0.05) in the Honk than in the two other groups. These results suggest that rapeseed meal can be used as the only protein supplement for fattening lambs despite the modification of thyroid histology by high glucosinolate content. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical changes and influences of rapeseed antinutritional factors on lamb physiology and performance - 2. Plasma substances and activity of the thyroid
Mandiki, S. N. M.; Mabon, N.; Derycke, G. et al

in Animal Feed Science & Technology (1999), 81(1-2), 93-103

In order to study the effects of a high level of rapeseed meal in the diet on endocrine function and thyroid activity, sixty six Texel, Suffolk or crossbred lambs allocated to three groups were fed ad ... [more ▼]

In order to study the effects of a high level of rapeseed meal in the diet on endocrine function and thyroid activity, sixty six Texel, Suffolk or crossbred lambs allocated to three groups were fed ad libitum with concentrates containing 0% (Control) or 25% of rapeseed meal obtained with either Samourai (Samourai) or Honk (Honk) rapeseed varieties. Lambs were weaned at 88 +/- 8 days of age and 24 +/- 5 kg of live weight and were slaughtered when their fattening state was estimated to be satisfactory. Blood samples were taken fortnightly for the determinations of hormones, glucose and transaminases (GOT and GPT). To evaluate the capacity of hormone production, the thyroid glands were collected at slaughter and the in-vitro release of thyroid hormones was recorded. The plasma concentrations in triiodothyronine (T-3) and thyroxine (T-4) decreased (P <0.05) with the age of lambs and were lower (P <0.05) in the Samourai and Honk groups than in the Control. Moreover, the capacity of T-3 and T-4 production by the thyroid gland shown by the in-vitro T-3 and T-4 accumulation in the thyroid tissues was higher (P <0.05) in the Control than in the two rapeseed groups. In contrast, the concentrate with rapeseed meal had no effect on the plasma concentrations in GH, cortisol and insulin nor on other substances (glucose, GOT and GPT). These results indicate that the ingestion of rapeseed meal induces a low functional disorder of the thyroid without affecting the animal performance of lambs, as we reported previously. This is because the thyroid hormones do not appear to play a major role in the processes of growth and fattening, these having been successively taken under the control on priority by GH and insulin. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical changes and influences of rapeseed antinutritional factors on lamb physiology and performance. 3. Antinutritional factors in plasma and organs
Mabon, N.; Mandiki, S. N. M.; Derycke, G. et al

in Animal Feed Science & Technology (2000), 85(1-2), 111-120

The impact of a high level of rapeseed meal in the diet on the concentration of antinutritional factors in plasma and organs was studied in 66 Texel, Suffolk or crossbred lambs. From 1 month of age till ... [more ▼]

The impact of a high level of rapeseed meal in the diet on the concentration of antinutritional factors in plasma and organs was studied in 66 Texel, Suffolk or crossbred lambs. From 1 month of age till slaughter (132+/-21 days), they were fed ad libitum with concentrates containing 0% or 25% of rapeseed meal obtained either Samourai or Honk rapeseed varieties. Lambs were weaned at 88+/-8 days of age and 24+/-5 kg live weight. Blood and organ samples were taken fortnightly for the determination of antinutritional factors. In plasma and organs, the thiocyanate concentrations were systematically higher in the Samourai and Honk lots than in the control. After weaning, the SCN- concentration in plasma increased up to 490 mu mol l(-1) in the Samourai lot. The goitrogen 5-vinyl-1,3-oxazolidine-2-thione (5-VOT) was determined in muscle, organs (thyroid, liver, kidney and lung) and biological fluid (plasma). The 5-VOT was present only after the ingestion of rapeseed meal but not to the same extent for the two varieties. The Honk rapeseed meal induced a 5-VOT level significantly (p<0.05) higher in the target organs such as lung and thyroid than Samourai. Very low levels were found in muscle, liver, kidney, plasma and lung. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical characterisation and in vitro assessment of the nutritive value of co-products yield from the corn wet-milling process
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Roiseux, Olivier et al

in Food Chemistry (2015), 166

The chemical characteristics of co-products recovered during a laboratory-scale wet milling procedure as well as that of whole corn flour were characterised and their digestibility and fermentability ... [more ▼]

The chemical characteristics of co-products recovered during a laboratory-scale wet milling procedure as well as that of whole corn flour were characterised and their digestibility and fermentability value determined using a 2 steps in vitro digestibility and fermentation model of the pig digestive tract. Five co-products differing in their chemical composition were collected and analysed. These co-products differed in their in vitro dry matter Digestibility and in their kinetic of fermentation. High coefficients of digestibility were observed for starchy samples, while low coefficients of digestibility were observed for samples rich in lignocellulosic components. Fermentation patterns of samples analysed were different as well as the profile of volatile fatty acids produced during the fermentation. The production of straight-chain fatty acids produced was significantly correlated with the proportion of starch in the sample, while branched-chain fatty acids were correlated to proteins concentration of samples. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical characteristics and oxidative stability of sesame paste, and olive oils.
Borchani, C.; Besbes, Souhail; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

in Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology (2010), 12

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See detailChemical Characterization Of Cuticular Extracts Of Sitobion Avenae (Hemiptera : Aphididae)
Muratori, Frédéric; Hance, Thierry; Lognay, Georges ULg

in Annals of the Entomological Society of America (2008), 101(3), 598-603

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See detailChemical characterization of Yarrowia lipolytica extracellular lipase.
Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Moreau, B.; Fickers, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (2000, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 ULg)