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See detailCan tropical basil be integrated in vegetable crop pest management?
Yarou, Boni Barthélémy ULg; Verheggen, François ULg; Heuskin, Stéphanie ULg et al

Poster (2016, May 17)

To address human and environmental health issues related to the use of synthetic pesticides, it is important to explore other ecological pest management approaches. Within this context, a study was ... [more ▼]

To address human and environmental health issues related to the use of synthetic pesticides, it is important to explore other ecological pest management approaches. Within this context, a study was conducted to evaluate the toxic and repellent effect of Ocimum gratissimum L. (Lamiaceae) on Myzus persicae S. (Aphididae). The toxicity of O. gratissimum essential oil (EO) was evaluated on M. persicae comparing 3 concentrations (0.001%; 0.01% and 0.1%) to a control (15% sucrose). Mortality rate and fecundity were assessed for each concentration. The observations were made daily, for 4 days, on 12 replicates per treatment. To test the repellent effect of O. gratissimum plants, 2 treatments were compared: a group of 8 Amaranthus cruentus L. (Amaranthaceae) plants with 1 plant of O. gratissimum in the middle and a group of 9 A. cruentus plants (control). The distribution of aphids was analyzed 12 days after the middle plant infestation (20 aphids per plant) for each treatment (6 replicates per treatment). O. gratissimum EO was found toxic from a concentration of 0.01%, with a mortality rate of 34% versus 12% for the control ; The fecundity felt from 30 larvae after 4 days (control) to 15 larvae for the 3 doses of the EO. The analysis with the generalized linear mixed model with Poisson error distribution followed by Turkey test (5 %) showed that EO is significantly more toxic than the control, both for mortality and fecundity (p <0.001). In association test, the population of M. persicae (15 aphids per plant) was significantly (p<0,001) lower when A. cruentus plants was associated with O. gratissimum plant than with the control (22 aphids per plant). Furthermore, the population increases gradually as one moves away from the infestation point in association test whereas it decreases in the control. With regards to these results, it appears that O. gratissimum has biocide effects on M. persicae. This plant may be used in an integrated pest management strategy in the production of vegetable to reduce the use of synthetic pesticides and avoid chemicals residues. [less ▲]

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See detailCan turbulence statistics reflect the meso-habitat choice of juvenile salmonids
Enders, Eva; Ovidio, Michaël ULg; Hallot, Eric ULg et al

in Proceedings of the combined conference on Hydro-Informatics and Ecohydraulics, Concepcion, Chile, January 2009. (2009)

Variables commonly used to describe the physical habitat of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. parr are average velocity, water depth, and substrate. A variety of micro- and meso-habitat models have been ... [more ▼]

Variables commonly used to describe the physical habitat of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. parr are average velocity, water depth, and substrate. A variety of micro- and meso-habitat models have been developed using these variables to assess habitat quality. However, Atlantic salmon parr live in highly turbulent streams and rivers, in which intense fluctuations of water velocity occur. Laboratory experiments have shown that turbulence affects the behavior and energetics of fish. Nevertheless, habitat use in relation to the strong temporal variability of velocity in natural environments has rarely been studied. In this study, Atlantic salmon parr habitat was examined in relation to turbulence in the Patapédia River, Québec, Canada. We analyzed meso-habitat use in relation to several dynamic hydraulic variables. Our results revealed that in a natural turbulent condition, parr displayed high individual variability in habitat use in relation to turbulence. Such heterogeneous use of habitat suggests that individuals are not constrained to a single habitat type but that they have a tendency to use areas with lower turbulence. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we detect adaptive radiations in marine fishes?
Santini, Francesco; Carnevale, Giorgio; Marrama, Giuseppe et al

Conference (2016, January)

The concept of adaptive radiation, according to which a biological lineage undergoes elevated rates of species diversification while at the same time experiencing divergence along ecological axis, is ... [more ▼]

The concept of adaptive radiation, according to which a biological lineage undergoes elevated rates of species diversification while at the same time experiencing divergence along ecological axis, is often invoked in evolutionary studies to explain the astonishing diversity of groups such as the cichlids of the African rift lakes, silverswords plants and honeycreeper birds in Hawaii, and anole lizards in the Neotropics. Recent surveys of the scientific literature, however, revealed that most studies of adaptive radiation do not recover the expected signal of early burst of lineage diversification, and in several animal groups rates of cladogenesis and phenotypic evolution may often be unlinked, thus creating complex patterns in the tempo of lineage and trait diversification. Furthermore, in spite of the dramatic increase in number of studies of the tempo and mode of evolution in marine fishes during the past decade, very little evidence has been uncovered to support the idea that adaptive radiations played a role in generating their staggering diversity, and even when a signal of radiation is recovered this virtually never conforms to the “traditional” early burst scenario. Using examples from our research on diverse groups of marine teleost fishes such as jacks and allies (Carangoidei), pufferfish and allies (Tetraodontiformes) and snappers (Lutjanidae), we will discuss why it is so difficult to recover a signal of adaptive radiation in general, and early burst in particular, and offer some suggestions on how to test for these patterns. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we identify patients to be treated in osteoarthritis?
Arden, NK; Richette, P; Cooper, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 61-62

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See detailCan we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment ? A focus on epidemiology and phenotype of osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C; Arden, N et al

in Drugs & Aging (2015), 32(3), 179-187

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society working meeting explored the possibility of identifying different patient profiles in osteoarthritis. The risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis include systemic factors (e.g., age, sex, obesity, genetics, race, and bone density) and local biomechanical factors (e.g., obesity, sport, joint injury, and muscle weakness); most also predict disease progression, particularly joint injury, malalignment, and synovitis/effusion. The characterization of patient profiles should help to better orientate research, facilitate trial design, and define which patients are the most likely to benefit from treatment. There are a number of profile candidates. Generalized, polyarticular osteoarthritis and local, monoarticular osteoarthritis appear to be two different profiles; the former is a feature of osteoarthritis comorbid with inflammation or the metabolic syndrome, while the latter is more typical of post-trauma osteoarthritis, especially in cases with severe malalignment. Other biomechanical factors may also define profiles, such as joint malalignment, loss of meniscal function, and ligament injury. Early- and late-stage osteoarthritis appear as separate profiles, notably in terms of treatment response. Finally, there is evidence that there are two separate profiles related to lesions in the subchondral bone, which may determine benefit from bone-active treatments. Decisions on appropriate therapy should be made considering clinical presentation, underlying pathophysiology, and stage of disease. Identification of patient profiles may lead to more personalized healthcare, with more targeted treatment for osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment? A focus on biomarkers ans frailty
Arden, Nigel; Richette, Pascal; Cooper, Cyrus et al

in Drugs & Aging (2015), 32

Osteoarthritis (OA), a disease affecting different patient phenotypes, appears as an optimal candidate for personalized healthcare. The aim of the discussions of the European Society for Clinical and ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis (OA), a disease affecting different patient phenotypes, appears as an optimal candidate for personalized healthcare. The aim of the discussions of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) working group was to explore the value of markers of different sources in defining different phenotypes of patients with OA. The ESCEO organized a series of meetings to explore the possibility of identifying patients who would most benefit from treatment for OA, on the basis of recent data and expert opinion. In the first meeting, patient phenotypes were identified according to the number of affected joints, biomechanical factors, and the presence of lesions in the subchondral bone. In the second meeting, summarized in the present article, the working group explored other markers involved in OA. Profiles of patients may be defined according to their level of pain, functional limitation, and presence of coexistent chronic conditions including frailty status. A considerable amount of data suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may also assist in delineating different phenotypes of patients with OA. Among multiple biochemical biomarkers identified, none is sufficiently validated and recognized to identify patients who should be treated. Considerable efforts are also being made to identify genetic and epigenetic factors involved in OA, but results are still limited. The many potential biomarkers that could be used as potential stratifiers are promising, but more research is needed to characterize and qualify the existing biomarkers and to identify new candidates. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we interpret linear kernel machine learning models using anatomically labelled regions?
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Monteiro, Joao; Joao Rosa, Maria et al

Poster (2014, June)

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See detailCan we measure LOGO's effects on user's problem solving behaviors ? (part 1)
Denis, Brigitte ULg

in Journal of the B L U G (British LOGO User Group) (1989), Spring

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See detailCan we measure LOGO's effects on user's problem solving behaviors ? (part 2)
Denis, Brigitte ULg

in Journal of the B L U G (British LOGO User Group) (1989), Autumn

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See detailCan we predict the high-risk patient?
Benitez, Jose-Manuel; Louis, Edouard ULg

in Digestive diseases (Basel, Switzerland) (2014), 32(4), 328-36

BACKGROUND: While therapeutic strategies able to change the natural history of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are being developed, factors predicting aggressive disease are needed to be able to choose ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: While therapeutic strategies able to change the natural history of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are being developed, factors predicting aggressive disease are needed to be able to choose the appropriate therapeutic strategy for the individual patient based on the risk/benefit ratio. The aim of this review is to focus on the tools assisting the clinician in routine practice regarding the prediction of disease evolution. METHODS: A literature review was performed, which was mainly based on PubMed search, using the following terms: Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, genetics, serology, biomarkers, endoscopy, C-reactive protein, faecal calprotectin, disease evolution and complications. RESULTS: For the prediction of disease evolution, clinical characteristics, particularly disease location and behaviour, are probably currently the most useful. In addition, a series of biomarkers, including genetic, serological and inflammatory markers, as well as characteristics of endoscopic lesions may have an added value. CONCLUSIONS: Simple clinical, biological and endoscopic tools may help the clinician in predicting disease evolution in IBD. However, these tools are still insufficient, and prospective evaluation of new genetic and biological markers are needed. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we predict troubles during horse clinical examination by a simple test?
Peeters, Marie ULg; Godfroid, Sandra; Sulon, Joseph et al

Poster (2010, August 03)

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See detailCan we really get rid of Japanese knotweed clones? Two years of management tests in Belgium
Monty, Arnaud ULg; Delbart, Emmanuel ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

Poster (2010, September)

Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica is an extremely abundant invasive plant in Belgium and surrounding countries. To date, no eradication method is available for managers facing the invasion of this ... [more ▼]

Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica is an extremely abundant invasive plant in Belgium and surrounding countries. To date, no eradication method is available for managers facing the invasion of this rhizomatous plant. We tested different chemical herbicides and two application methods (spraying and stem injection), as well as mechanical treatments, on Fallopia clones throughout southern Belgium. The tested methods were selected to be potentially usable by Belgian managers, e.g. using legally accepted rates for herbicides. Stem volume, height and density reduction was assessed after one or two years depending on the treatment. No tested method allowed a complete eradication of the clone. However, stem injection with glyphosate-based herbicide caused the highest damage. The year following injection, no sprouts were observed. Two following year, however, stunted shoots sprouted. Among mechanical control measures, repeated cuts combined with native trees cuttings plantations most appreciably reduced knotweed development. The most efficient methods we tested appear as tools for curbing knotweed invasion but are not likely to be used to eradicate the species. As such they should be included in a more integrated control strategy, together with prevention and public awareness campaigns. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we restore natural habitats after plant invasion? Lessons from years of management
Frisson, Gwenn ULg; Halford, Mathieu ULg; Delbart, Emmanuel ULg et al

Conference (2010, August)

Negative impacts of invasive plants on natural habitats have been widely demonstrated. Hence, the management of invasive plants, aiming at eradicating, or at least controlling their spread, is being more ... [more ▼]

Negative impacts of invasive plants on natural habitats have been widely demonstrated. Hence, the management of invasive plants, aiming at eradicating, or at least controlling their spread, is being more and more developed. For this purpose, we need to identify the most efficient management techniques which could lead to the restoration of invaded ecosystems. Up to now, management methods mentioned in literature were pragmatic tools and often lacked scientific assessment. For several years, we have tested similar mechanical and chemical management techniques in the field on highly invasive plant species, representative of different life forms and invaded habitats: herbaceous rhizomatous perennial Fallopia japonica, ligneous rhizomatous Spiraea spp., ligneous root suckering Acer rufinerve and ligneous stoloniferous Cotoneaster horizontalis. We investigated the efficiency, cost and feasibility of these techniques, and their effects on the restoration of invaded ecosystems. The best performing management technique was found to be highly species specific and was also influenced by the invaded habitat type. For these perennial species, long-term management must be considered, to reduce their competitive capacities with repeated mechanical or chemical techniques (cutting or pulling out several times a year, injection combined with mechanical methods, etc.). For species with sexual reproduction, like Acer rufinerve and Cotoneaster horizontalis, seed bank and seed dispersal must also be taken into account to avoid dissemination when managing. We can conclude invasion plant management is usually expensive and hard to implement but some results are encouraging and show the importance to carry on research on invasive plant management methods. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we trust Type Ia Supernovae as cosmological tools? - Critical analysis and alternative processing of SCP Supernovae data
Hauret, Clémentine ULg; Magain, Pierre ULg

Poster (2015, July)

Current processing to standardize Type Ia Supernovae SCP data produces a significant bias in favour of a particular cosmological model, the flat ΛCDM model. To reduce this bias, we develop an alternative ... [more ▼]

Current processing to standardize Type Ia Supernovae SCP data produces a significant bias in favour of a particular cosmological model, the flat ΛCDM model. To reduce this bias, we develop an alternative, model-independent, methodology. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we use bone turnover markers as targets for antiresorptive treatment in postmenopausal osteoporosis ? an analysis from two phase 3 clinical trials.
BROWN, J.P.; DAKIN, P.; HADJI, P. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatology (2015), 67(S10), 515-517

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See detailCan we use circulating biomarkers to monitor bone turnover in CKD haemodialysis patients? Hypotheses and facts
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2014), 29(5), 997-1004

Assessing bone turnover is a key diagnostic tool in the global management of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Since bone biopsy is invasive and cannot be repeated in clinical ... [more ▼]

Assessing bone turnover is a key diagnostic tool in the global management of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Since bone biopsy is invasive and cannot be repeated in clinical practice and because bone histomorphometry is less available due to the lack of specialized laboratories, we will focus on potential biomarkers used to assess and monitor bone turnover. After briefly reviewing the pathophysiology of bone turnover in CKD and haemodialysis patients, we will focus on the strengths and limitations of the now recommended biomarkers, i.e. parathormone and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase. We will consider the clinical and also the biological aspects of the topic and also insist on the use of these biomarkers for the monitoring, and the follow-up of the turnover in haemodialysis subjects. Finally, we will discuss some of the most promising, but still not recommended, emerging biomarkers. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we use electrical resistivity tomography to measure root zone competition in fields with multiple crops?
Garré, Sarah ULg; Coteur, Ine; Wongleecharoen, Chalemchart et al

in Procedia Environmental Sciences (2013, June 20)

Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion on steep agricultural land. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated ... [more ▼]

Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion on steep agricultural land. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated hedgerows may reduce the overall performance of these systems. ERT measurements conducted in Thailand showed that the soils of our experimental plots were very heterogeneous both along the slope as with depth. This observation highlighted some constraints of the ERT method for soil moisture monitoring in the field. Nevertheless, the data indeed revealed contrasting water depletion patterns under monocropping and intercropping systems, which could also be related to plant parameters. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we use Electrical Resistivity Tomography to measure root zone moisture dynamics in fields with multiple crops?
Garré, Sarah ULg; Coteur, Ine; Wongleecharoen, Chalemchart et al

in 2012 Scientific program (2012, December 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULg)