Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan orbital angle morphology distinguish dogs from wolves?
Janssens, Luc; Spanoghe, Inge; Miller, Rebecca ULg et al

in Zoomorphology (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCan passive house be the solution to our energy problems, and particularly with solar energy?
Merciadri, Luca ULg

E-print/Working paper (2007)

A description about the main characteristics of the passive house concept. The aim of this document is to answer to the question ``Can passive house be the solution to our energy problems, and ... [more ▼]

A description about the main characteristics of the passive house concept. The aim of this document is to answer to the question ``Can passive house be the solution to our energy problems, and particularly with solar energy ?'' in an objective way. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 144 (29 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan performance-based financing be used to reform health systems in developing countries?
Ireland, Megan; Paul, Elisabeth ULg; Dujardin, Bruno

in Bulletin of the World Health Organization (2011), 89(9), 695-698

Over the past 15 years, performance-based financing has been implemented in an increasing number of developing countries, particularly in Africa, as a means of improving health worker performance. Scaling ... [more ▼]

Over the past 15 years, performance-based financing has been implemented in an increasing number of developing countries, particularly in Africa, as a means of improving health worker performance. Scaling up to national implementation in Burundi and Rwanda has encouraged proponents of performance-based financing to view it as more than a financing mechanism, but increasingly as a strategic tool to reform the health sector. We resist such a notion on the grounds that results-based and economically driven interventions do not, on their own, adequately respond to patient and community needs, upon which health system reform should be based. We also think the debate surrounding performance-based financing is biased by insufficient and unsubstantiated evidence that does not adequately take account of context nor disentangle the various elements of the performance-based financing package. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan perturbative QCD predict a substantial part of diffractive LHC / SSC physics?
Cudell, Jean-René ULg; Margolis, B.

in Physics Letters B (1992), 297

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan phonological and semantic short-term memory be dissociated ? Further evidence from Landau-Kleffner syndrome
Majerus, Steve ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychology (2004), 21(5), 491-512

Recent studies have made a distinction between short-term storage capacities for phonological information and short-term storage capacities for lexico-semantic information (R. Martin, Lesch,

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan phytoestrogen-rich plants restore the image of livestock in terms of human health? Do they promise a differentiated quality products chain?
Daems, Frédéric ULg; Jasselette, Christophe; Lognay, Georges ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In a project named PhytoHealth, the development of analytical methods for studying the impact of phytoestrogens rich diet on the «health value» of animal products is in progress. Despite the ambiguous ... [more ▼]

In a project named PhytoHealth, the development of analytical methods for studying the impact of phytoestrogens rich diet on the «health value» of animal products is in progress. Despite the ambiguous image that have phytoestrogens, some of their metabolites seemed to have potentially beneficial effects to human health. In a first time, a microbial metabolite (equol) was selected and its metabolism in dairy cow is studied. A first method using the UPLC®-MS/MS technology has been validated and has achieved a screening of equol content in milk consumed in Wallonia. Equol was found in all milk samples analyzed and a significant difference between farming methods has been highlighted. A second analytical method to quantify the equol precursors was then developed and a study of forage plants consumed by Belgian dairy cows will be conducted to select the richest fodder varieties. Other methods will be developed to better understand the metabolism in the cow and estimate the impact of enriched milk on human health. An original approach involving the use of minipigs will be considered. In the end, creating of a differentiated quality animal products chain could be interesting for the consumer, but also recoverable for the producer. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (23 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan Pleistocene refuge theory explain within-species patterns of genetic diversity in African lowland rainforest trees?
Heuertz, Myriam; Savolainen, Vincent; Budde, Katharina et al

Poster (2010)

Pleistocene refuge theory holds that regions which nowadays harbour high numbers of endemic species correspond to forest refuges, where rainforest persisted through periods of adverse climatic conditions ... [more ▼]

Pleistocene refuge theory holds that regions which nowadays harbour high numbers of endemic species correspond to forest refuges, where rainforest persisted through periods of adverse climatic conditions. In order to test this theory, we surveyed geographical patterns of genetic diversity based on chloroplast DNA sequences in 15 rainforest tree species from 12 plant families in Atlantic Equatorial Africa. We found frequent geographic structure in the data sets, but no consistent pattern of genetic structure due to refugia. Species with gravity-dispersed oily seeds display low polymorphism whilst those with divergent lineages or ancient species display high polymorphism. Phylogeographical signals often correspond to taxa with divergent lineages. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 182 (9 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan positron emission tomography (PET) predict the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) ? Controversies and updates in vascular surgery.
SAKALIHASAN, Natzi ULg; HUSTINX, Roland ULg; GOMEZ, Pierre et al

in Can positron emission tomography (PET) predict the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) ? Controversies and updates in vascular surgery. (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
See detailCan Positron Emission Tomography (PET) predict the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm(AAA)?
Sakalihasan, Natzi ULg; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Gomez, Pierre et al

in Controversies and updates in vascular surgery 2008 (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCan prenatal nutritional constraints in the chicken embryo have long-term effects on the post-hatch performance and glucose metabolism?
Willems, E.; Koppenol, A.; Lesuisse, J. et al

Scientific conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan principal component analysis be used to predict the dynamics of a strongly non-linear marine biogeochemical model?
Raick, Caroline ULg; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg; Soetaert, Karline et al

in Ecological Modelling (2006), 196(3-4), 345-364

In the framework of model complexity reduction, we investigate the ability of the principal component analysis technique to represent in a compact form the dynamics of a coupled physical-ecosystem model ... [more ▼]

In the framework of model complexity reduction, we investigate the ability of the principal component analysis technique to represent in a compact form the dynamics of a coupled physical-ecosystem model. The biogeochemical model describes the evolution in time and depth of the partly decoupled nitrogen and carbon cycles of the pelagic food web in the Ligurian Sea (North Western Mediterranean Sea) through 19 biogeochemical state variables. The GHER hydrodynamic model (1D version) is used to represent the physical forcings. The coupled model presents a high variability in time and space that can be decomposed in modes by principal component analysis. To investigate the possibility of being represented in a compact form, the model is constrained to evolve in a reduced space spanned by its most dominant modes of variability that are the empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Different orthogonal bases (formed by 1D and OD EOFs) are used to investigate the performance and realism of the method. 1D vertical EOFs show a tendency to impose a spatial structure to model results according to the most dominant EOFs. In the case of OD EOFs, results of the reduced model can be very close to the original one, but it requires a large number of modes. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (11 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCan regional blocs (still) talk with each other? The Euro-Mercosur relationship
Santander, Sébastian ULg

in World Affairs (2016), 2/33 (459)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan satellites help organic crop certification?
Denis, Antoine ULg; Desclee, Baudouin; Migdall, Silke et al

Poster (2012, November 08)

Organic agriculture, while producing healthy food and contributing to protect the environment, needs to be certified in order to meet the consumers confidence. The objective of this study was to ... [more ▼]

Organic agriculture, while producing healthy food and contributing to protect the environment, needs to be certified in order to meet the consumers confidence. The objective of this study was to investigate how earth observation techniques could enhance the crop certification process and in particular the possibility to discriminate organic and conventional fields. These different crop management methods results in crop biophysical differences which are supposed to be observable by earth observation techniques. A set of satellites with varying spatial and spectral resolution was used to compute discriminant indicators. Under the best conditions the results show a complete discrimination between organic and conventional crops. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 151 (27 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan science explain consciousness? Lessons from coma and related states
Martial, Charlotte ULg

Conference (2017, March)

Understanding consciousness remains one of the greatest mysteries for science to solve. How do our brains work? How can we know if some patients in coma have any consciousness left and how could we ... [more ▼]

Understanding consciousness remains one of the greatest mysteries for science to solve. How do our brains work? How can we know if some patients in coma have any consciousness left and how could we communicate with them? What are near-death experiences? What is brain death? What happens in our brains during dreaming, hypnosis or meditation? At present, nobody understands how matter (our trillions of neural connections) becomes perception and thought. We will here briefly review some neurological facts on consciousness and impaired consciousness. Thanks to recent advances in (neuroimaging) technology, the mapping of conscious perception and cognition in health (e.g., conscious waking, sleep, dreaming, hypnosis, meditation, sleepwalking and anesthesia) and in disease (e.g., coma, near-death, “vegetative” state, seizures, hallucinations etc) is providing exiting new insights into the functional neuroanatomy of human consciousness. Our perception of the outside world (sensory awareness; what we see, hear, etc.) and our awareness of an inner world (self-awareness; the little "voice" inside that "speaks" to ourselves) seemingly depend on two separate networks we could recently identify. Philosophers might argue that the subjective aspect of the mind will never be sufficiently accounted for by the objective methods of reductionistic science. We here prefer a more pragmatic approach and remain naively optimistic that technological advances might ultimately lead to an understanding of the neural substrate of human consciousness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCan sea ice-specific biogeochemical processes support significant air-ice CO2 fluxes?
Delille, Bruno ULg; Lannuzel, Delphine; Schoemann, Véronique et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2006), 8

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan serum progesterone be used to decide altrenogest supplementation discontinuation in problem pregnancies in mares?
Parrilla Hernandez, Sonia ULg; Delahaut, Philippe; Ponthier, Jérôme ULg et al

Poster (2016, June)

Use of oral altrenogest as exogenous progesterone (P4) in mares in an effort to maintain high-risk pregnancies is a widespread practice. Treatment is sometimes initiated as early as 2 days after ovulation ... [more ▼]

Use of oral altrenogest as exogenous progesterone (P4) in mares in an effort to maintain high-risk pregnancies is a widespread practice. Treatment is sometimes initiated as early as 2 days after ovulation. Timing when it can safely be stopped is frequently uncertain and therefore, supplementation is often continued until 100-120 days, when the placental secretion of progestagens has taken over. The aim of this study was to determine if altrenogest interfered with progesterone assay and if timing of altrenogest administration discontinuation could be based on the blood concentration of P4. Data were obtained from 7 healthy standard breed mares in seasonal anoestrus and in dioestrus. Mares were considered anoestrus when no follicles larger than 15 mm in diameter or corpus luteum (CL) were found at 2 consequent ultrasound examinations 7 days apart. They were confirmed dioestrus based on an observed ovulation and the presence of a CL 2 days after. Mares were treated with 0.044 mg/kg of altrenogest (Regumate®, Intervet, Boxmeer, Netherlands) orally once per day during 12 days beginning at any time for the anestrus group and at day 2 after ovulation for the dioestrus group. Blood was collected at day 0, 6, 12, 18 right before altrenogest administration and the serum was stored at -20°C until analysis. P4 concentration was obtained by radioimmunoassay and altrenogest by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Differences in P4 and in altrenogest concentrations between different sampling days were determined by Friedman non parametric test. Concentrations of altrenogest before treatment were almost not detectable (negative control). At day 6, they were significantly higher (p<0.05), and were back to basal, almost not detectable values at day 18, in both groups. P4 concentration was basal with values < 0.4 ng/ml all through the experiment in the anoestrus group. In the dioestrus group, P4 concentration was variable from one mare to another, but it was significantly higher in mid-dioestrus (day 6) as compared to the time of the impending next oestrus (day12). No cross-reaction between P4 and altrenogest assays was observed as illustrated by the fact that concentration of P4 during anoestrus remained basal with or without supplementation. Despite the treatment, the variation of P4 over time was as expected in both groups. Altrenogest was no longer detectable 6 days after the last administration. Further studies with larger numbers and sampling in dioestrus to compare P4 levels in treated and untreated mares to investigate the potential effect of altrenogest on endogenous P4 production by the CL are needed. However, our experiment shows that P4 levels assayed by RIA can be trusted to evaluate if the secondary CL’s have become functional and can thus maintain the pregnancy while oral altrenogest supplementation is discontinued. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan soil bunds increase the production of rain-fed lowland rice in south eastern Tanzania
Raes, Dirk; Kafiriti, Elly M.; Wellens, Joost ULg et al

in Agricultural Water Management (2007), 89

Rain-fed lowland rice is by far the most common production system in south eastern Tanzania. Rice is typically cultivated in river valleys and plains on diverse soil types although heavy soil types are ... [more ▼]

Rain-fed lowland rice is by far the most common production system in south eastern Tanzania. Rice is typically cultivated in river valleys and plains on diverse soil types although heavy soil types are preferred as they can retain moisture for a longer period. To assess the effects of soil bunds on the production of rain-fed lowland rice, the crop was cultivated in bunded and non-bunded farmers’ plots under the common agronomic practices in the region, in three successive seasons on Grumic Calcic Vertisols (Pellic). For the three seasons and for the two plot types, crop transpiration was simulated with the BUDGET soil water balance model by using the observed weather data, soil and crop parameters. Comparison between the observed yields and the simulated crop transpiration yielded an exponential relationship with a determination factor of 0.87 and an RMSE of 0.15 tonnes ha−1. With the validated soil water balance model crop yields that can be expected in bunded and non-bunded fields were subsequently simulated for wet, normal and dry years and various environmental conditions. Yield comparison shows that soil bunds can appreciably increase the production of rain-fed lowland rice in south eastern Tanzania in three quarters of the years (wet and normal years) when the soil profile is slow draining (KSAT equal to or less than 10 mm day−1). In normal years a minimum yield increase of 30% may be expected on those soil types. In wet years and when the soil hardly drains (drainage class of 0–5 mm day−1), the yield may even double. In dry years the yield increase will be most of the time less than 10% except for plots with a percolation rate of 0–5 mm day−1. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan standardized uptake value (SUV) characterize brain tumors on FDG PET Scan ?
HUSTINX, Roland ULg; BENARD, F.; SHNIER, D. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (1998), 39

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan systems using hyper specialized breeds be considered as localized agrifood systems? The example of the Belgian Texel breed
Lauvie, Anne; Stassart, Pierre M ULg

Conference (2014)

The Belgian Texel sheep breed is a meat purpose breed, the Belgian form of the Dutch Texel breed, with muscular hypertrophy. Comparing the situation of this breed to others hyper specialized breeds in ... [more ▼]

The Belgian Texel sheep breed is a meat purpose breed, the Belgian form of the Dutch Texel breed, with muscular hypertrophy. Comparing the situation of this breed to others hyper specialized breeds in Belgium raise the question of the existence of a Belgian breeding model. We interviewed 11 stakeholders concerned by the Texel breed (breeders, scientists, veterinary, extension service technician, and butcher). Those interviews have allowed us to discuss three dimensions of the Texel breed management: ‐ The breed is actually a breeding animals propose breed. Sheep meat is few consumed in Belgium and butchers seem to prefer crossbreed meat than pure Texel meat. As a consequence the main aim for breeding Texel is breeding animals selling. The breeders consider the selection activity as their activity, and underline that it is more interesting for them from an economical point of view to sell breeding animals abroad (United Kingdom). ‐ The breed management follows a Belgian model and is as a consequence localized! The Blanc Bleu Belge cattle breed is clearly a model for the Texel breeders and several of them mention the “Belgian eye of the breeder”. Producing meat in quantity is the core motivation in this breeding model (a breeding model that echoes an engineering culture where performance is a core motivation). Among the organization of breeding in Belgium, the breeding shows contests are important places where this model is shared by breeders, even among deferent species. ‐ The breed is very well adapted to its breeding situation but what about it adaptive capacities? The breed is mentioned as adapted to grazing (good quality grassland) and it is as well adapted to socio-territorial conditions of belgium (small area). The breed is easy to breed (except during the lambing period very time consuming which means that flocks are often small flocks). It’s considered as well adapted to breeding animal production for crossbreeding. However, most of the interviewed persons have mentioned failures in adaptation to changes in breeding conditions (bigger flocks, breeding in hot climate area for instance). Thanks to this case study, we discuss the fact that qualifying an agrifood system as “localized” is not enough and that it is crucial to understand and analyze the anchorages in local as dynamics and in their dynamics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 ULg)