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See detailChanges in excitatory and inhibitory amino acids as a possible target for new treatments of alcoholism
De Witte, Philippe; Ward, Roberta; Dahchour, Abdelkhader et al

in International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology (1998), 1

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See detailChanges in femoral neck bone mineral density are associated with hip fracture incidence in untreated postmenopausal women
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Brandi, M. L.; Vellas, B. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008, April), 19(Suppl.1), 18-19

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See detailChanges in function of iron-loaded alveolar macrophages after in vivo administration of desferrioxamine and/or chloroquine.
Legssyer, Rachida; Josse, Claire ULg; Piette, Jacques ULg et al

in Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry (2003), 94(1-2), 36-42

Both desferrioxamine (DFO) and chloroquine can significantly reduce hepatic iron in experimental animals with iron overload by chelating iron from the low-molecular-weight pool or decreasing iron uptake ... [more ▼]

Both desferrioxamine (DFO) and chloroquine can significantly reduce hepatic iron in experimental animals with iron overload by chelating iron from the low-molecular-weight pool or decreasing iron uptake by the transferrin-transferrin receptor cycle, respectively. However, no previous studies have investigated whether combination therapy of these two drugs would further decrease the tissue iron overload as well as iron-induced toxicity. Chloroquine administration, 15 mg/kg, 5x/week, to rats during the iron loading regime, 10 mg/kg, 3x/week for 4 weeks, significantly decreased both hepatic (54%) and macrophage iron content (24%). However when administered in combination with desferrioxamine, 10 mg/kg, 3x/week for 2 weeks at the cessation of iron loading, no further reduction of hepatic iron content was noted while the iron content of the macrophages significantly increased, possibly indicating the flux of ferrioxamine through these cells. Further studies are warranted to investigate the speciation of iron within these macrophages. Macrophages isolated from chloroquine-treated iron loaded rats showed a reduction in latent NFkappaB activation and a significant increase in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitrite release by comparison to these parameters in iron loaded macrophages. Co-administration of chloroquine and desferrioxamine normalised the latent activity of NFkappaB to that of control macrophages as well as increasing LPS-stimulated NO release towards control values. However, DFO alone did not have any significant effect upon either of these parameters. Such results may have important relevance for the reduced immune function of iron loaded macrophages isolated from thalassaemia patients receiving chelation therapy and their propensity to increased infection. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in functional interactions during anaesthesia-induced loss of consciousness
Schrouff, Jessica ULg; Perlbarg, Vincent; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

Poster (2010, December 12)

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol ... [more ▼]

Consciousness has been related to the amount of integrated information that the brain is able to generate. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that the loss of consciousness caused by propofol anesthesia is associated with a significant reduction in the capacity of the brain to integrate information. To assess the functional structure of the whole brain, functional integration and partial correlations were computed from fMRI data acquired from 18 healthy volunteers during resting wakefulness and propofol-induced deep sedation. Total integration was significantly reduced from wakefulness to deep sedation in the whole brain as well as within and between its constituent networks (or systems). Integration was systematically reduced within each system (i.e., brain or networks), as well as between networks. However, the ventral attentional network maintained interactions with most other networks during deep sedation. Partial correlations further suggested that functional connectivity was particularly affected between parietal areas and frontal or temporal regions during deep sedation. Our findings suggest that the breakdown in brain integration is the neural correlate of the loss of consciousness induced by propofol. They stress the important role played by parietal and frontal areas in the generation of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in gene expression in the leaf of Lolium temulentum L. Ceres during the photoperiodic induction of flowering
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Ongena, Philippe; Bernier, Georges ULg

in Planta (1996), 200(1), 32-40

Unifoliated plants of Lolium temulentum L. Ceres were induced to flower by a unique 24-h long day (LD) consisting of the extension of the regular 8-h short day (SD) (400 µmol photons·m-2·s-1, fluorescence ... [more ▼]

Unifoliated plants of Lolium temulentum L. Ceres were induced to flower by a unique 24-h long day (LD) consisting of the extension of the regular 8-h short day (SD) (400 µmol photons·m-2·s-1, fluorescence + incandescence) with incandescence at 10–15 µmol photonsm -2·s-1. The polyadenylated-RNA complement of leaf blade tissues was analysed at 4-h intervals during the photoperiod extension in LD vs. SD, by using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to resolve in-vitro-translated products. Of the 991 spots that were analysed, none appeared or disappeared during the inductive cycle, i.e. no qualitative effect of floral induction was detected, at any time. Sixty-eight spots were found whose intensity was influenced by lengthening of the photoperiod; 50 of them, i.e. ca. 5 of the population analysed, were affected before the end of the extension period and were thus potentially related to floral induction. Many of these RNAs were not quantitatively constant during a 24-h cycle in SD. Seven of them oscillated according to the ‘light-on’ and the ‘light-off’ signals, among which three seemed to be controlled by phytochrome since their relative amount increased under the standard light conditions but decreased under incandescence even faster than in darkness. The large majority of other RNAs varied with a timing that was not clearly driven by the alternation of light and darkness, indicating that genes related to the biological clock may be especially sensitive to the lengthening of the photoperiod. Furthermore, seven spots were observed that underwent a phase-shift in LD, which consisted, for six of them, of a phase advance of 4–8 h. The steady-state level of CAB mRNA was analysed because the CAB gene family (encoding the chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins of the light-harvesting complexes) is known to be controlled both by the biological clock and phytochrome. In SD, the level was high in the light and low in darkness; the fluctuation was conducted by a circadian rhythm. When plants were exposed to the inductive LD, the peak of mRNA accumulation that was expected according to the endogenous rhythmicity was abolished, possibly because of the change in light quality during the LD extension. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in glucose turnover parameters and improvement of glucose oxidation after 4-week magnesium administration in elderly noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetic patients.
Paolisso, G.; Scheen, André ULg; Cozzolino, D. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1994), 78(6), 1510-4

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of magnesium supplementation on glucose uptake and substrate oxidation in noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetic patients. Nine elderly non ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of magnesium supplementation on glucose uptake and substrate oxidation in noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetic patients. Nine elderly non-obese noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetic patients, treated by diet only, participated in the study, which was designed as randomized, double blind, and cross-over. Each patient was followed up for a prestudy period of 3 weeks before inviting him/her to receive placebo or magnesium supplementation (15.8 mmol/day) for 4 weeks. At the end of each treatment period, a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp with simultaneous D-[3-3H]glucose infusion and indirect calorimetry was performed. Magnesium supplementation resulted in significantly increased plasma and erythrocyte magnesium levels, whereas body weight and fasting plasma glucose did not change. In the last 60 min of the glucose clamp, insulin-mediated glucose disappearance, total body glucose disposal (24.5 +/- 0.4 vs. 28.2 +/- 0.7 mumol/kg.min; P < 0.005), and glucose oxidation (13.0 +/- 0.4 vs. 16.3 +/- 0.8 mumol/kg.min; P < 0.01) were increased after chronic magnesium supplementation. Endogenous glucose production, nonoxidative glucose disposal, lipid and protein oxidation, and insulin MCR were not affected. In conclusion, a 4-week magnesium supplementation improves insulin sensitivity and glucose oxidation in the course of a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp in noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients. Long term studies are needed to determine whether magnesium supplementation is useful in the management of type II diabetes. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in hindquarter metabolite uptake when turning from maintenance to fattening in Belgian Blue bulls double muscled type
Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Van Eenaeme, Christian ULg; Baldwin, Paule et al

in Proceeding of the British Society of Animal Science (1997)

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See detailChanges in histone H4 acetylation during in vivo versus in vitro maturation of equine oocytes
Franciosi, Federica; Lodde, Valentina; Goudet, Ghylène et al

in Molecular Human Reproduction (2011)

Epigenetic modifications are established during gametogenesis and preimplantation embryonic development. Any disturbance of the normal natural environment during these critical phases could cause ... [more ▼]

Epigenetic modifications are established during gametogenesis and preimplantation embryonic development. Any disturbance of the normal natural environment during these critical phases could cause alterations of the epigenetic signature. Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in the regulation of chromatin organization and gene expression. The present study was aimed to determine whether the proper establishment of post-translational histone H4 acetylation at lysine 8 (AcH4K8), 12 (AcH4K12), and 16 (AcH4K16) of equine oocytes is adversely affected during in vitro maturation when compared to in vivo matured oocytes collected from naturally cycling mares not undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation. The acetylation patterns were investigated by means of indirect immunofluorescence staining with specific antibodies directed against the acetylated lysine residues. Our results indicate that the acetylation state of H4 is dependent on the chromatin configuration in immature GV stage oocytes and it changes in a residue-specific manner along with the increase of chromatin condensation. In particular, the levels of AcH4K8 and AcH4K12 increased significantly, while AcH4K16 decreased significantly from the fibrillar to the condensed state of chromatin configuration within the GV. Moreover, during meiosis K8 and K12 were substantially deacetylated without any differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions, while K16 displayed a strong acetylation in oocytes matured in vivo, and in contrast, it was markedly deacetylated following in vitro maturation. Although the functional meaning of residue-specific acetylation during oocyte differentiation and meiotic resumption needs further investigation, our results support the hypothesis that in vitro maturation conditions can adversely affect oocyte ability to regulate the epigenetic reprogramming, critical for successful meiosis and subsequent embryonic development. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in intestinal microbial ecophysiology as related to the carbohydrate composition of barleys and oats cultivars in an in vitro model of the pig gastrointestinal tract
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Pieper, Robert; Leterme, Pascal et al

in Livestock Science (2010), 133

The influence of variation in carbohydrate (CHO) composition within the same type of cereal on intestinal fermentation patterns and microbial community composition in the pig is unknown. Ten hulless ... [more ▼]

The influence of variation in carbohydrate (CHO) composition within the same type of cereal on intestinal fermentation patterns and microbial community composition in the pig is unknown. Ten hulless barleys (HLB), 6 hulled barleys (HB), 6 oats (O) and 6 oat groats (OG) were studied in vitro. These cultivars differed in β-glucan, non-starch polysaccharides (total, soluble and insoluble), starch content and structure. They were hydrolyzed enzymatically, inoculated with pig feces and fermented for 72h. Fermentation kinetics was modelled, and microbial composition and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profiles analyzed using TRFLP and gas chromatography. Multivariate analysis revealed that microbial profiles, SCFA and fermentation parameters were affected by CHO composition but differently according to the grain type (HLB, HB, O or OG). Members of Clostridium cluster XIVa were associated to higher amylose contents and butyrate production in HB cultivars and in HLB cultivars. Several clostridia phylotypes were positively influenced by β-glucan content in HLB and HB. Cellulolytic Ruminococcus-like bacteria were increased with cellulose content in HB, HLB and OG and these bacteria tended to increase acetate production in general. Bacteroides-like bacteria were positively affected by amylopectin and starch content of barley cultivars. Cereal cultivars differing in CHO composition can alter the pig intestinal microbial ecophysiology to possibly improve gut health. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in isoform patterns and stability of CK-MB during storage
El Allaf, M.; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg

in Clinical Chemistry (1989), 35

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See detailChanges in leucocyte counts related to adrenocortical function in horses during exercise
Linden, Annick ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1991)

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See detailChanges in lipoxygenase and hydroperoxide decomposition activity in tissues cultures of soybean
Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg; Mouttalib, A.; Billo, D. et al

in Journal of Plant Physiology (2001), 158(7), 953-955

Glycine max L. tissue cultures were initiated on different media supplemented with appropriate plant growth regulators that specifically induce the formation of callus, root, or shoot primordia ... [more ▼]

Glycine max L. tissue cultures were initiated on different media supplemented with appropriate plant growth regulators that specifically induce the formation of callus, root, or shoot primordia. Exogenously applied hormones resulted in important changes in both Lox and HPO decomposition activity. Lox activity was higher in extracts from tissues cultured in medium supplemented with NAA or 2,4-D, while a lowest activity was recorded in extracts from cultures treated with BA. 13-HPOD was cleaved by all tested extracts, while 13-HPOT and 9-HPOD were cleaved exclusively by extracts from tissues cultured in the presence of BA. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in major intracellular osmolytes in L-929 cells following rapid and slow application of hyperosmotic media.
Libioulle, Cécile ULg; Corbesier, L.; Gilles, Raymond ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2001), 130(3), 461-70

Cultured L-929 cells respond to media-made hyperosmotic (600 mOsmol/kg H2O) by addition of NaCl, sorbitol or proline by adjusting successively their intracellular level in different osmolytes: Na+, K ... [more ▼]

Cultured L-929 cells respond to media-made hyperosmotic (600 mOsmol/kg H2O) by addition of NaCl, sorbitol or proline by adjusting successively their intracellular level in different osmolytes: Na+, K+, amino acids and sorbitol. In the NaCl medium, Na+ and K+ are first to increase. Their concentration is then down-regulated while they are replaced by less disrupting osmolytes: amino acids and sorbitol. The amino-acid level is also adjusted with respect to the increase in sorbitol which starts only after 24 h, depending on the induction of aldose reductase. A similar evolution in the amount of these osmolytes is observed, with different time scales and amplitudes, depending on whether the osmotic shocks are applied abruptly or slowly, in a more physiological way. The interplay between the osmolytes is also different depending on their availability in the external medium. Such complex evolutions indicate that a cascade of interacting signals must be considered to account for the overall regulation process. It can hardly be fitted into a model implicating a single primary signalling event (early increase in ions or decrease in cell volume) as usually postulated. Also, the volume up-regulation is not significantly different in the different conditions, showing that it is not primarily dependent on the adjustment of the intracellular osmolarity which is reached immediately upon cell shrinkage and is maintained all over, independently of the availability and changes in nature of the osmolytes. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in matrix gene and protein expressions after single or repeated exposure to one minimal erythemal dose of solar-simulated radiation in human skin in vivo
Seite, S.; Colige, Alain ULg; Deroanne, Christophe ULg et al

in Photochemistry and Photobiology (2004), 79(3), 265-271

Damage to the skin extracellular matrix (ECM) is the hallmark of long-term exposure to solar UV radiation. The aim of our study was to investigate the changes induced in unexposed human skin in vivo after ... [more ▼]

Damage to the skin extracellular matrix (ECM) is the hallmark of long-term exposure to solar UV radiation. The aim of our study was to investigate the changes induced in unexposed human skin in vivo after single or repeated (five times a week for 6 weeks) exposure to I minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UV solar-simulated radiation. Morphological and biochemical analyses were used to evaluate the structural ECM components and the balance between the degrading enzymes and their physiologic inhibitors. A three-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase 2 messenger RNA (mRNA) (P < 0.02, unexposed versus exposed) was observed after both single and repeated exposures. Fibrillin 1 mRNA level was increased by chronic exposure (P < 0.02) and unaltered by a single MED. On the contrary, a single MED significantly enhanced mRNA levels of interleukin-la (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta (P < 0.02) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant decrease in Type-I procollagen localized just below the dermal-epidermal junction in both types of exposed sites. At the same location, the immunodetected tenascin was significantly enhanced, whereas a slight increase in Type-III procollagen deposits was also observed in chronically exposed areas. Although we were unable to observe any change in elastic fibers in chronically exposed buttock skin, a significant increase in lysozyme and alpha-1 antitrypsin deposits on these fibers was observed. These results demonstrate the existence of a differential regulation, after chronic exposure compared with an acute one, of some ECM components and inflammatory mediators. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in mediobasal hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone messenger ribonucleic acid levels induced by mating or ovariectomy in a reflex ovulator, the ferret.
Bakker, Julie ULg; Rubin, B. S.; Baum, M. J.

in Endocrinology (1999), 140(2), 595-602

The ferret is a reflex-ovulating species in which receipt of an intromission induces a prolonged (+/- 12 h) preovulatory LH surge in the estrous female. This LH surge is probably stimulated by a large ... [more ▼]

The ferret is a reflex-ovulating species in which receipt of an intromission induces a prolonged (+/- 12 h) preovulatory LH surge in the estrous female. This LH surge is probably stimulated by a large release of GnRH from the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). In Exp 1 we asked whether GnRH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels increase in response to mating so as to replenish the MBH GnRH stores needed to sustain the preovulatory LH surge. Estrous females were killed 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 14, or 24 h after the onset of a 10-min intromission from a male. Coronal brain sections ranging from the rostral preoptic area caudally to the posterior hypothalamus were processed for in situ hybridization using a 35S-labeled oligoprobe complementary to the human GnRH-coding region. We found no evidence of increased MBH GnRH mRNA levels during the ferret's mating-induced preovulatory LH surge. Instead, the number of GnRH mRNA-expressing cells dropped significantly in the arcuate region beginning 6 h after onset of intromission and remained low thereafter. Furthermore, cellular GnRH mRNA levels decreased in the arcuate region toward the end of the preovulatory LH surge. In Exp 2 we asked whether ovarian hormones regulate MBH GnRH mRNA levels in the female ferret. Ovariectomy of estrous females significantly reduced the number of GnRH mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate region. This decrease was probably not due to the absence of circulating estradiol. Gonadally intact anestrous females had levels of MBH GnRH mRNA similar to those in estrous females even though plasma estradiol levels were equally low in anestrous females and ovariectomized females. Ovarian hormones other than estradiol may stimulate MBH GnRH mRNA levels in anestrous and estrous females. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in mitral regurgitation and left ventricular geometry during exercise affect exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure.
Izumo, Masaki; Suzuki, Kengo; Moonen, Marie ULg et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011), 12(1), 54-60

AIMS: exercise may dramatically change the extent of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We hypothesized that dynamic ... [more ▼]

AIMS: exercise may dramatically change the extent of functional mitral regurgitation (MR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We hypothesized that dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry would affect exercise capacity. METHODS AND RESULTS: this study included 30 CHF patients with functional MR who underwent symptom-limited bicycle exercise stress echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing for quantitative assessment of MR (effective regurgitant orifice; ERO), and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). LV sphericity index was obtained from real-time three-dimensional echocardiograms. The patients were stratified into exercised-induced MR (EMR; n = 10, an increase in ERO by >/=13 mm(2)) or non-EMR (NEMR; n = 20, an increase in ERO by <13 mm(2)) group. At rest, no differences in LV volume and function, ERO, and PASP were found between the two groups. At peak exercise, PASP and sphericity index were significantly greater (all P < 0.01) in the EMR group. The EMR group revealed lower peak oxygen uptake (peak VO(2); P = 0.018) and greater minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope (VE/VCO(2) slope; P = 0.042) than the NEMR group. Peak VO(2) negatively correlated with changes in ERO (r = -0.628) and LV sphericity index (r = -0.437); meanwhile, VE/VCO(2) slope was well correlated with these changes (r = 0.414 and 0.364, respectively). A multivariate analysis identified that the change in ERO was the strongest predictor of peak VO(2) (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: dynamic changes in MR and LV geometry contributed to the limitation of exercise capacity in patients with CHF. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in motor unit numbers in patients with ALS: a longitudinal study using the adapted multiple point stimulation method.
Wang, François-Charles ULg; Bouquiaux, Olivier ULg; De Pasqua, Victor ULg et al

in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis & Other Motor Neuron Disorders (2002), 3(1), 31-8

METHOD: The adapted multiple point stimulation (AMPS) method for calculating motor unit numbers (MUNE) was applied in 12 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) before riluzole therapy (T(0 ... [more ▼]

METHOD: The adapted multiple point stimulation (AMPS) method for calculating motor unit numbers (MUNE) was applied in 12 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) before riluzole therapy (T(0)) and again after 4, 8 and 12 months of treatment. RESULTS: Paired Student's t-test indicated a significant decrease of thenar MUNE and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) size at each 4-monthly interval, while average surface motor unit potential (SMUP) size did not change significantly over time. The rate of motor unit (MU) loss at month 4 was more than 20% in six patients (group 1) and less than 20% in six other patients (group 2). Comparison of groups 1 and 2 by Mann-Whitney U-testing indicated that percent changes in thenar MUNE and CMAP size compared to baseline were significantly different at months 4, 8 and 12, while no difference between the two groups was found for average SMUP size variations. In the group with a slow rate of MU loss, CMAP size remained stable, while in the group with a rapid rate of MU loss, there was a dramatic reduction in size of the CMAP. A positive correlation was found between percent change in thenar MUNE at T(4) and at T(12) (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: AMPS is a useful technique to document MUNE, SMUP size and CMAP size changes over time in patients with ALS. [less ▲]

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