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See detailCharacterization of an in vivo model of VZV latency in the nervous system
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S. et al

Conference (1994)

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See detailCharacterization of an Insulating Material with regards to ECCS. Recommendations for the Fire Safety of Steel Structures
Bruls, Aloïs; Cajot, Louis-Guy; Franssen, Jean-Marc ULg

in Journal of Constructional Steel Research (1988), 9(2), 111-135

How to characterize an insulating product by an apparent constant thermal conductivity

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See detailCharacterization of an internal type-II NADH dehydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondria
Remacle, Claire ULg

in 15th International Conference on the Cell & Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas (2012, June)

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See detailCharacterization of an original model of myocardial infarction provoked by coronary artery thrombosis induced by ferric chloride in pig
Dogné, Jean-Michel ULg; Rolin, Stéphanie; Petein, Michel et al

in Thrombosis Research (2005), 116(5), 431-442

Background: Great advances have been made in the prevention of thrombotic disorders by developments of new pharmacological and surgical treatments. Animal models of arterial thrombosis have largely ... [more ▼]

Background: Great advances have been made in the prevention of thrombotic disorders by developments of new pharmacological and surgical treatments. Animal models of arterial thrombosis have largely contributed to the discovery and to the validation of original treatments. The purpose of the present work was to develop and validate an original model of acute myocardial infarction provoked in pig by thrombosis of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery induced by topical application of ferric chloride solution. Methods and results: Myocardial infarction, resulting from an occlusive and adherent mixed thrombus formed in the LAD coronary artery, was examined at macroscopic level using dual staining technique (Evans blue dye; triphenyltetrazolium chloride) and at microscopic level using conventional histological analyses and immunohistochemical detection of desmin. Biochemical markers (troponin T and ATP), platelet reactivity and standard hemodynamic parameters (such as stroke volume, ejection fraction, stroke work and cardiac output) have also been evaluated. From these analyses, it was demonstrated that each pig developed a transmural area of irreversible damage mainly located in the anteroseptal region of the left ventricle. The more progressive development of coronary artery occlusion, as compared to an abrupt Ligation, was accompanied by a correspondingly progressive impairment in hemodynamics. Conclusion: We conclude that this original porcine model of myocardial infarction is quite close to clinical pathophysiological conditions, such as thrombus formation occurring after atherosclerotic plaque rupture. This certainly constitutes a further argument in favour of this model to assess pharmaceutical or mechanical support of an acutely ischemic heart. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an unusual thyroid response unit in the promoter of the human placental lactogen gene
Voz, Marianne ULg; Peers, Bernard ULg; Belayew, Alexandra et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1991), 266(20), 13397-404

The human placental lactogen B (hCS-B) promoter activity is strongly stimulated by thyroid hormones in the rat pituitary GC cell line. The minimal DNA sequence required for stimulation, as determined by ... [more ▼]

The human placental lactogen B (hCS-B) promoter activity is strongly stimulated by thyroid hormones in the rat pituitary GC cell line. The minimal DNA sequence required for stimulation, as determined by transfection with 5' and 3' deletion mutants, spans 67 base pairs, from coordinate -97 to -31. DNase I footprinting experiments show that this thyroid response unit includes two adjacent binding sites: one for the thyroid receptor (-67/-41), the other for the pituitary-specific factor GHF1 (-95/-68). Neither region alone is sufficient to confer thyroid responsiveness. The thyroid receptor binding element (TBE) does not contain any repeats or palindromes but is composed of two different domains, one of which is very similar to the half-palindromic motif described by Glass et al. (Glass, C.K., Holloway, J.M., Devary, O.L., and Rosenfeld, M.G. (1988) Cell 54, 313-323). The other is very rich in purine. The normal human growth hormone (hGH-N) promoter, which is 94% similar to the hCS-B promoter, differs from its hCS-B counterpart precisely in this TBE. This difference may explain the opposite 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) regulation of these two genes. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an up-stream promoter directing extrapituitary expression of the human prolactin gene
Berwaer, M.; Martial, Joseph ULg; Davis, J. R.

in Molecular Endocrinology (1994), 8(5), 635-42

The human PRL gene is expressed outside pituitary lactotrophs in decidualized endometrium and lymphoid cells, but here the mRNA contains a 5'-untranslated region from an additional noncoding exon 1a. We ... [more ▼]

The human PRL gene is expressed outside pituitary lactotrophs in decidualized endometrium and lymphoid cells, but here the mRNA contains a 5'-untranslated region from an additional noncoding exon 1a. We have isolated a genomic DNA clone containing human PRL exon 1a with 2800 basepairs (bp) of 5'-flanking sequences. Sequencing locates exon 1a -5840 bp up-stream of the pituitary start site. To study its suspected regulatory function, various lengths of the 5'-flanking region were linked to the luciferase (Luc) reporter gene. Their ability to direct gene expression has been analyzed in transfection studies. The proximal 1620 bp of promoter sequence directed Luc expression in the T-lymphoid Jurkat cell line, and this was unaffected by 5'-deletion to the proximal 453 bp. However, further 5'-deletion to the most proximal 67 bp drastically reduced this activity by 90%. The exon 1a promoter was inactive in pituitary GH3 cells and HeLa cells; in contrast, the exon 1b pituitary promoter, active in GH3 cells, was inactive in Jurkat cells. DNase-I footprinting studies and further 5'- and 3'-deletion analysis identified factor-binding sites within an enhancer element located at -375/-212 bp, which contributed approximately 50% of the promoter activity. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of anti-GBM antibody reactivity subsequent to renal transplantation in two Alport Syndrome patients
Dehan, Pierre ULg; Weber, M.; Reeders, S. et al

in Journal of the American Society of Nephrology [=JASN] (1993), 4

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See detailCharacterization of antiplatelet activity of ticlopidine and acetylsalicylic acid by PFA-100
Dogne, J. M.; De Leval, X.; Neven, P. et al

Poster (1999, November 20)

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See detailCharacterization of antiplatelet activity of ticlopidine and acetylsalicylic acid by PFA-100
Dogne, J.-M.; De Leval, X.; Neven, P. et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (2000), 14

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See detailCharacterization of Arthrospira / Spirulina strains: Molecular Aspects
Baurain, Denis ULg; Scheldeman, Patsy; Renquin, Laurent et al

Report (1999)

We present the results of a phylogenetic study, based on ARDRA of the rDNA operon, of 38 Arthrospira (‘Spirulina’) cultivated clonal strains from four continents. In addition, duplicates from different ... [more ▼]

We present the results of a phylogenetic study, based on ARDRA of the rDNA operon, of 38 Arthrospira (‘Spirulina’) cultivated clonal strains from four continents. In addition, duplicates from different culture collections or markedly different morphotypes of particular strains established as clonal cultures were treated as separate entries, resulting in a total of 54 tested cultures. Three living samples from Earthrise Farms ponds (September 1997), four freeze-dried samples from EF ponds (August 1996, February and March 1997) and a powder of ‘Spirulina pacifica’ were also included in the study. The strain Spirulina laxissima SAG 256.80 was used as outgroup. The 16S rRNA genes appeared too conserved for discrimination of the strains by ARDRA, and thus the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) was selected as a molecular taxonomic marker. The ITS sequences situated between the 16S and the 23S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR and yielded amplicons of about 540 bp. The amplicons were digested with four restriction enzymes (EcoR V, Hha I, Hinf I, Mse I) and the banding patterns obtained were analyzed. Cluster analysis showed the separation of all the strains into two main clusters (Clusters I and II), of which Cluster I was divided into Subclusters I.A and I.B. Four freeze-dried samples from EF cultivation ponds (Summer 1996 and Winter 1997), as well as a sample of powder sent as ‘Spirulina pacifica’ appeared to contain a mixture of genotypes from Clusters I and II. No clear relationships could be observed between this division into two clusters and the geographic origin of the strains, or their designation in the culture collections, or their morphology. Direct use of cells for PCR seemed to inhibit the amplification reaction. This was overcome by the design of a crude lysis protocol and addition of BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) in the PCR mix. In order to study in more depth the genotypic relationships of Arthrospira, we have obtained the ITS sequence of 19 cultures and 7 samples (living or freeze-dried samples from EF ponds, dried natural samples and one commercial pill). The data confirmed the existence of Clusters I and II, but also subdivided each of them into two Subclusters (A and B). In three cultures, simultaneous presence of types II.A and II.B was detected. It is likely that sequences of both types are contained in different copies of the ITS and that the three cultures represent cryptic duplicates of one unique genotype. The strains cultivated in the EF ponds belong to types I.A, II.A and II.B, while the winter ponds samples were a mixture of types I and II. Though there was surprisingly little sequence variability in the ITS sequences, we designed PCR primers which are specific for the two clusters (44 different positions) and for the four subclusters (2 to 4 different positions). [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of bacteria in biopsies of colon and stools by high throughput sequencing of the V2 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene in human.
Momozawa, Yukihide; Deffontaine Deurbroeck, Valérie ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg et al

in PloS one (2011), 6(2), 16952

BACKGROUND: The characterization of the human intestinal microflora and their interactions with the host have been identified as key components in the study of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The characterization of the human intestinal microflora and their interactions with the host have been identified as key components in the study of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases. High-throughput sequencing has enabled culture-independent studies to deeply analyze bacteria in the gut. It is possible with this technology to systematically analyze links between microbes and the genetic constitution of the host, such as DNA polymorphisms and methylation, and gene expression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study the V2 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene using 454 pyrosequencing from seven anatomic regions of human colon and two types of stool specimens were analyzed. The study examined the number of reads needed to ascertain differences between samples, the effect of DNA extraction procedures and PCR reproducibility, and differences between biopsies and stools in order to design a large scale systematic analysis of gut microbes. It was shown (1) that sequence coverage lower than 1,000 reads influenced quantitative and qualitative differences between samples measured by UniFrac distances. Distances between samples became stable after 1,000 reads. (2) Difference of extracted bacteria was observed between the two DNA extraction methods. In particular, Firmicutes Bacilli were not extracted well by one method. (3) Quantitative and qualitative difference in bacteria from ileum to rectum colon were not observed, but there was a significant positive trend between distances within colon and quantitative differences. Between sample type, biopsies or stools, quantitative and qualitative differences were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Results of human colonic bacteria analyzed using high-throughput sequencing were highly dependent on the experimental design, especially the number of sequence reads, DNA extraction method, and sample type. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) heartwood extractives: identification of resveratrol and piceatannol
Sergent, Thérèse; Kohnen, Stéphane; Jourez, Benoît ULg et al

in Wood Science and technology (2014)

Robinia pseudoacacia L. heartwood is characterized by a very high natural durability. However, a significant difference was observed between the mature and juvenile heartwood, the latter presenting less ... [more ▼]

Robinia pseudoacacia L. heartwood is characterized by a very high natural durability. However, a significant difference was observed between the mature and juvenile heartwood, the latter presenting less durability against fungi decay, which could be attributed to lower extractive content. In order to elucidate this idea, extractives from mature and juvenile heartwoods of black locust trees were investigated. Results showed that extractive and phenolic contents were higher in mature than in juvenile heartwoods. The identification of phenolic compounds by UPLC–DAD–MS/MS revealed, for the first time, the presence of resveratrol and piceatannol. These two stilbenes as well as the flavonoid dihydrorobinetin were present at the highest level in mature heartwood, and as they are known antifungals, they could account for the great durability of mature heartwood. The stilbenes were detected in significant amounts particularly in mature heartwood where piceatannol reached a level tenfold higher than that reported for Japanese knotweed roots, the primary natural source of these stilbenes, whereas resveratrol level was comparable with reported values. As resveratrol and piceatannol receive increasing demand for nutraceutical, cosmetic and, possibly, pharmaceutical purposes, due to their beneficial health effects, this study underlines the use of R. pseudoacacia as a promising sustainable and economical source of resveratrol and piceatannol. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of BoHV-5 field strains circulation and report of transient specific subtype of bovine herpesvirus 5 in Argentina
Maidana, S. S.; Ladelfa, M. F.; Perez, S. et al

in BMC Veterinary Research (2011), 7

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See detailCharacterization of bovine and human cellular prion protein expressed in the central nervous system and in lymphoid organs.
Defaweux, Valérie ULg; Stramiello, Sara; Capellari, Sabina et al

Poster (2005, October)

Prion cell tropism varies significantly among animal species, depending on both the agent strain and host-specific factors. For example, prions show high lymphotropism in scrapie infected sheep and vCJD ... [more ▼]

Prion cell tropism varies significantly among animal species, depending on both the agent strain and host-specific factors. For example, prions show high lymphotropism in scrapie infected sheep and vCJD, but little, if any, in sCJD or BSE. In particular, the BSE strain is associate with significant PrP-res accumulation in tonsils, spleen and appendix in humans, whereas, it is largely confined to the nervous system in infected cattle. So, it appears that, at least in the case of BSE and vCJD, host properties can influence the accumulation of the infectious agent in lymphoid organs. Given that the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), is sine qua non for PrP-res formation and the development of TSE, it appears reasonable to hypothesize that tissue-specific PrPC properties may represent one of the host factors influencing the cell tropism of the infectious agent in human or bovine. We applied a western blot analyses to compare the relative percentage of the di-, mono- and unglycosylated PrPC (the so called glycoform ratio) as well as the expression of truncated PrPC forms in tissues from the central nervous system and lymphoid structures (lymphoid follicles, lymphocytes and follicular dendritic cells) of both bovine and human. We found that PrPC glycoform ratio is significantly different between cerebellum and medulla in both bovine and human. Moreover, the expression of truncated forms of PrPC (i.e. 21 and 18 kDa PrPC) was also significantly heterogenous according to the brain region investigated. PrPC was highly glycosylated in spleen and lymphoid follicles isolated from bovine tonsils, mesenteric lymph nodes, ileal and jejunal Peyer’s patches. After deglycosylation, a novel PrPC truncated form with a relative molecular mass of about 25 kDa was detected in bovine lymphoid organs beside the typical 18 and 21 kDa forms. No difference in WB PrPC profile was seen in human lymphocytes extracted either from spleen or tonsil. Our results highlight variation in the profile expression of PrPC in peripheral and central tissues of bovine and human. Such differences may have an implication for PrPC function or may represent critical factors influencing the accumulation of the infectious agent in these areas. Supported by the EU contract QLG3-CT-2002-81030. [less ▲]

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