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See detailCarbon balance of two Belgian crops
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg; Vilret, Amélie et al

in Open conference on the GHG cycle in the Northern Hemisphere (2006)

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See detailCarbon biogeochemistry of the Betsiboka Estuary (north-western Madagascar)
Ralison, Olivier Harifidy; Borges, Alberto ULg; Dehairs, Frank et al

in Organic Geochemistry (2008), 39

Madagascar’s largest estuary (Betsiboka) was sampled along the salinity gradient during the dry season to document the distribution and sources of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC, DOC) as ... [more ▼]

Madagascar’s largest estuary (Betsiboka) was sampled along the salinity gradient during the dry season to document the distribution and sources of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC, DOC) as well as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The Betsiboka was characterized by a relatively high suspended matter load, and in line with this, low DOC/POC ratios ( 0.4–2.5). The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) was generally above atmospheric equilibrium (270–1530 ppm), but relatively low in comparison to other tropical and subtropical estuaries, resulting in low average CO2 emission to the atmosphere (9.1 ± 14.2 mmol m 2 d 1). Despite the fact that C4 vegetation is reported to cover >80% of the catchment area, stable isotope data on DOC and POC suggest that C4 derived material comprises only 30% of both pools in the freshwater zone, increasing to 60–70% and 50–60%, respectively, in the oligohaline zone due to additional lateral inputs. Sediments from intertidal mangroves in the estuary showed low organic carbon concentrations (<1%) and d13C values (average 19.8‰) consistent with important inputs of riverine imported C4 material. This contribution was reflected in d13C signatures of bacterial phospholipid derived fatty acids (i + a15:0), suggesting the potential importance of terrestrial organic matter sources for mineralization and secondary production in coastal ecosystems. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon black-filled polymer blends : a scanning probe microscopy characterization
Leclère, Philippe; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Gubbels, Frédéric et al

in Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings (1997), 457

Conducting polymer composites, that consist of a conducting filler randomly distributed throughout an insulating polymer or polymer blend, attract interest in several application fields such as sensors or ... [more ▼]

Conducting polymer composites, that consist of a conducting filler randomly distributed throughout an insulating polymer or polymer blend, attract interest in several application fields such as sensors or electromagnetic radiation shielding. The macroscopic electrical resistivity of the filled polyblend strongly depends on the localization of the filler. Here, we investigate the morphology of Carbon Black (CB)-filled polymer blends in order to determine the parameters governing the selective localization of CB in one phase of the blend components or at the interface between the components. The dispersion of the CB particles in the polymer blend is observed by means of Lateral Force Microscopy (LFM) as a function of the blend composition and the load in CB. The selective localization of CB at the interface enables the reduction of the percolation threshold down to 0.5 wt%; as a result, the mechanical properties of the polymer blend can be fully retained. Different techniques can be used to locate the CB at the interface; we compare their efficiency experimentally. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon Budget as a Tool for Assessing Mangrove Forests Degradation in the Western, Coastal Wetlands Complex (Ramsar Site 1017) of Southern Benin, West Africa
Ajonina, Gordon N.; Ago, Expédit Evariste ULg; Amoussou, Gautier et al

in Diop, Salif; Barusseau, Jean-Paul; Descamps, Cyr (Eds.) The Land/Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone of West and Central Africa (2014)

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See detailCarbon budget of a sugar beet crop
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Vilret, Amélie; Delvoye, Sébastien et al

in Abstracts and proceedings - 68th Congress 2005 (2005)

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See detailCarbon budget of a sugar beet crop
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Vilret, Amélie; Delvoye, Sébastien et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2005), 7(1),

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See detailCarbon budget of a sugar beet crop
Moureaux, Christine ULg; Bodson, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg

Conference (2005)

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See detailThe Carbon budget of the North Sea
Thomas, H.; Bozec, Y.; de Baar, Hein J. W. et al

in Biogeosciences (2005), 2(1), 87-96

A carbon budget has been established for the North Sea, a shelf sea on the NW European continental shelf. The carbon exchange fluxes with the North Atlantic Ocean dominate the gross carbon budget. The net ... [more ▼]

A carbon budget has been established for the North Sea, a shelf sea on the NW European continental shelf. The carbon exchange fluxes with the North Atlantic Ocean dominate the gross carbon budget. The net carbon budget – more relevant to the issue of the contribution of the coastal ocean to the marine carbon cycle – is dominated by the carbon inputs from rivers, the Baltic Sea and the atmosphere. The North Sea acts as a sink for organic carbon and thus can be characterised as a heterotrophic system. The dominant carbon sink is the final export to the North Atlantic Ocean. More than 90% of the CO2 taken up from the atmosphere is exported to the North Atlantic Ocean making the North Sea a highly efficient continental shelf pump for carbon. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon capture and storage at the University of Liège
Léonard, Grégoire ULg

Scientific conference (2014, November 05)

The objective of this presentation was to discuss the main technologies of CO2 capture, re-use and storage, with their respective characteristics (costs, challenges...), advantages and drawbacks. Then ... [more ▼]

The objective of this presentation was to discuss the main technologies of CO2 capture, re-use and storage, with their respective characteristics (costs, challenges...), advantages and drawbacks. Then, the second part of the presnetation highlights the main research results that have been achieved at the University of Liège in this field. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon Cycle and Climate Sensitivity in an Earth System Model
Mouchet, Anne ULg; Loutre, M.; Fichefet, T. et al

Poster (2008, December)

The sensitivity of the potential feedbacks between climate and biogeochemical cycles (BGC) is adressed with the help of LOVECLIM, a global three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity ... [more ▼]

The sensitivity of the potential feedbacks between climate and biogeochemical cycles (BGC) is adressed with the help of LOVECLIM, a global three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity. Key physical or biogeochemical parameters of LOVECLIM are varied within their range of uncertainty in order to provide an ensemble of parameter sets resulting in contrasted climate and global carbon cycle sensitivities. The selected climate parameter sets lead to a climate sensitivity ranging from 2 to 4°C and a reduction of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC) ranging from 20 to 60% after 1 kyr in response to identical external forcings. The key parameters for the carbon cycle were chosen among those with the largest impact on the marine biogeochemical cycle and on the response of atmospheric CO2 to emission scenario. We then analyze the results of freshwater hosing experiments in which both the climate parameters and the BGC parameters are modified. These experiments allow to examine the impact of changes in climate sensitivity and of MOC reduction over the biogeochemical cycles as well as to assess the potential feedback from the carbon cycle onto the climate. A decreasing MOC directly impacts the ocean biogeochemistry. Most of the model setups show a decline in export production although some parameter sets yield reorganisation of the large scale ocean circulation, which leads to different behaviour of the ocean biogeochemistry. The atmospheric carbon is also affected by a decrease of the MOC. While most parameter sets cause a modest increase in atmospheric CO2, consecutive to the decrease of the continental vegetation, some model versions exhibit an amplification of the atmospheric CO2 response to the forcing. The mechanisms leading to the different responses for the different parameter sets are examined and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon cycle and hydrology in the palaeo-terrestrial environments
François, Louis ULg; Probst, Jean-Luc

in Global and Planetary Change (2008), 61(1-2), 1-2

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See detailCarbon cycle dynamics during interglacials
Brovkin, V; Kleinen, T; Ganopolski, A et al

Conference (2010, December 16)

Explaining a difference in atmospheric CO2 dynamics among interglacials is an elusive issue. Several biogeochemical mechanisms of different origin are involved in interglacial CO2 dynamics leading to a ... [more ▼]

Explaining a difference in atmospheric CO2 dynamics among interglacials is an elusive issue. Several biogeochemical mechanisms of different origin are involved in interglacial CO2 dynamics leading to a CO2 release from the ocean (carbonate compensation, coral growth) compensated by a land carbon uptake (biomass and soil carbon buildup, peat accumulation). The balance between these fluxes of CO2 is delicate and time-dependent, and it is not possible to provide firm constraints on these fluxes from proxy data. The best framework for quantification of all these mechanisms is an Earth System model that includes all necessary physical and biogeochemical components of the atmosphere, ocean, and land. To perform multi-millennial model integrations through the Holocene and Eemian, we use an intermediate complexity climate model, CLIMBER-2, coupled to the LPJ DGVM model with recently implemented boreal peatland module. The global carbon cycle is never in complete equilibrium during the glacial cycles due to changes in small but persistent fluxes such as terrestrial weathering. This complicates setting up the interglacial runs as the usual approach to start model integration from equilibrium state is not valid anymore. To by-pass this problem of non-equilibrium initial conditions, the model is initialized with the oceanic biogeochemistry state taken from a transient CLIMBER-2 simulation through the last glacial cycle. In this simulation, the CLIMBER-2 model was run through the last glacial cycle with carbon cycle in “offline mode” as interactive components of the physical climate system (atmosphere, ocean, ice sheets) were driven by concentration of greenhouse gases reconstructed from ice cores. In response to simulated climate change, the carbon cycle model was able to reproduce the main features of glacial CO2 dynamics reconstructed from ice cores. Results of the CLIMBER-LPJ model integrations through the Holocene and Eemian interglacials in terms of climate changes and atmospheric CO2 and d13CO2 dynamics will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon cycle dynamics during recent interglacials
Kleinen, T.; Brovkin, V.; Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Climate of the Past Discussions (2015), 11(3), 1945-1983

Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials, the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11, are investigated using an Earth system Model of Intermediate ... [more ▼]

Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials, the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11, are investigated using an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity, which we extended with modules to dynamically determine two slow carbon cycle processes – peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation). For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle setup neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP, but are not relevant before this time. Therefore our model experiments show for the first time how the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials can be explained consistently using an identical model setup. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon cycle modelling and remote sensing
François, Louis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Warnant, Pierre ULg

in Space scientific research in Belgium, Vol. III, Earth Observation, Part 2 (1994)

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See detailCarbon cycle modelling and remote sensing
François, Louis; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg

in Space scientific research in Belgium (Earth Observations) (1995)

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See detailCarbon cycling and burial in the glacially influenced polar North Atlantic
Taylor, Justin; Tranter, Martyn; Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Paleoceanography (2002), 17(1), 1001

We have collated published records of carbon storage (wt% calcium carbonate and organic carbon) in polar North Atlantic sediments in order to assess the role that the glacial history of Greenland and ... [more ▼]

We have collated published records of carbon storage (wt% calcium carbonate and organic carbon) in polar North Atlantic sediments in order to assess the role that the glacial history of Greenland and Fennoscandia may have had on carbon cycling in this oceanographically important region. The proportion of carbonate in sediment varies between 0 and similar to 50%, while that of organic carbon varies between 0 and similar to 2.0%. The spatial variation of the concentration and accumulation of both constituents is markedly different. Bulk accumulation shows a strong relationship with depth, distance offshore, and the location of major glacial outlets on neighboring landmasses. Therefore, ice sheet dynamics and erosion influence carbon (especially organic carbon) storage strongly during the late Weichselian (27-12 C-14 ka) via their impact on sedimentation rates and constituents. In contrast, water mass characteristics are important in determining the pattern of carbon storage during the Holocene. Carbonate fluxes to the polar North Atlantic sediment Column fall by similar to50% during glacials to similar to 1.1 x 10(13) kg kyr(-1), but organic carbon storage is maintained at or greater than interglacial levels (similar to 4.6 x 10(11) kg kyr(-1)). This represents a 100% change in the ratio of preserved inorganic to organic carbon. When combined with reduced deep water ventilation, respiration of this relatively greater organic carbon flux in both the water and sediment columns provides a good explanation for the observed periodic enhanced dissolution of carbonate in polar North Atlantic late Weichselian sections. perhaps enhancing CO2 storage in deep waters. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon cycling in a large, meromictic tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa): insights from seasonal monitoring of biogeochemical depth profiles
Morana, C; Darchambeau, F; Muvundja, F et al

Poster (2014, April 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)