References of "Veterinary Microbiology"
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See detailFatal transmission of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia to an Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx)
Chaber, AL; Lignereux, L; Al Qassimi, M et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (in press)

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See detailFirst isolation and molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Benin
Gorna, K; Houndjè, E; Romey, A et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2014)

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See detailCarriage and acquisition rates of Clostridium difficile in hospitalized horses, including molecular characterization, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Brévers, Bastien et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2014)

lostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the ... [more ▼]

lostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the development of C. difficile infection. Horses admitted to a care unit are therefore at greater risk of being colonized. The aim of this study was to investigate the carriage of C. difficile in hospitalized horses and the possible influence of some risk factors in colonization. During a seven-month period, faecal samples and data relating the clinical history of horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital were collected. C. difficile isolates were characterized through toxin profiles, cytotoxicity activity, PCR-ribotyping, antimicrobial resistance and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ten isolates were obtained with a total of seven different PCR-ribotypes, including PCR-ribotype 014. Five of them were identified as toxinogenic. A high resistance to gentamicin, clindamycin and ceftiofur was found. MLST revealed four different sequencing types (ST), which included ST11, ST26, ST2 and ST15, and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the isolates clustered in the same lineage. Clinical history suggests that horses frequently harbour toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. difficile and that in most cases they are colonized regardless of the reason for hospitalization; the development of diarrhoea is more unusual. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations between properties linked with persistence in a collection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis
Bardiau, Marjorie ULg; Detilleux, Johann; Farnir, Frédéric et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013)

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See detailFeline polymorphonuclear neutrophils produce pro-inflammatory cytokines following exposure to Microsporum canis
Cambier, Ludivine ULg; Mathy, A; Baldo, A et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013), 162(2-4), 800-805

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See detailImportance of identification and typing of Brucellae from West African cattle: a review
Sanogo, M; Abatih, E; Thys, E et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013)

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See detailSubtilisin Sub3 is involved in adherence of Microsporum canis to human and animal epidermis
Bagut, ET; Baldo, A; Mathy, Anne ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2012), 160(3-4), 413-419

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See detailGenetic and splice variations of Bos taurus CD46 shift cell permissivity to BVDV, the bovine pestivirus.
Zezafoun, Hussein ULg; Decreux, Annabelle; Desmecht, Daniel ULg

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 152(3-4), 315-27

The pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is known to bind to the CD46 molecule, which subsequently promotes entry of the virus. Mapping of the BVD-virion-binding site has shown that two peptides ... [more ▼]

The pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is known to bind to the CD46 molecule, which subsequently promotes entry of the virus. Mapping of the BVD-virion-binding site has shown that two peptides, 66EQIV69 and 82GQVLAL87, located on antiparallel beta sheets in the most distal complement control protein module (CCP1), provide the attachment platform. In the present study, we reveal the existence of ten distinct allelic versions of the CCP1 module, varying significantly in frequency among taurine and indicine races. A complex mRNA splicing pattern was also evidenced for bovine CD46, generating three different serine-threonine-proline segments and five different cytoplasmic domains. The four most frequent allelic variants and the six splice variants were then expressed in BVDV-nonpermissive porcine cells and the quantity of progeny virions generated by each cell preparation was measured 48 h post-infection. As expected, ectopic expression of the 10 bovine CD46 isoforms rendered the PK15 cells permissive to BVDV, as attested by the 100,000-fold greater recovery of virions from these cells than from non-transfected cells. This permissivity increase was significantly lower (-33%, P<0.001) when the canonical CCP1 was replaced with the variant most frequent in zebus, suggesting positive or negative selection of this allele in the latter and in the former, respectively. The predicted secondary structure of this variant suggests that the measured loss of function is due to the disappearance of one of the two beta sheets constituting the BVDV attachment platform. On the other hand we showed that for a given CCP1, the titer recovered at 48 hpi also depended on the nature of the CD46 cytoplasmic domain (P<0.001). This result implies that virus binding generates a cytoplasmic-tail-dependent outside-in signal that determines permissivity to BVDV. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of ovine herpesvirus 2-induced malignant catarrhal fever in rabbits
Li, Hong; Cunha, Cristina W.; Gailbreath, Katherine L. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 150(3-4), 270-7

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal lymphoproliferative disease syndrome primarily of ruminant species, caused by gammaherpesviruses in the genus Macavirus. Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2 ... [more ▼]

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal lymphoproliferative disease syndrome primarily of ruminant species, caused by gammaherpesviruses in the genus Macavirus. Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), carried by sheep, causes sheep-associated MCF worldwide, while Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried by wildebeest, causes wildebeest-associated MCF, mainly in Africa. Diseases in rabbits can be induced by both viruses, which are clinically and pathologically similar; however, recent studies revealed different expression of viral genes associated with latency or lytic replication during clinical disease between the two viruses. In this study, we further characterized experimentally induced MCF in rabbits by nebulization with OvHV-2 from sheep nasal secretions to elucidate the course of viral replication, along with in vivo incorporation of 5-Bromo-2’-Deoxyuridine (BrdU), to evaluate lymphoproliferation. All six rabbits nebulized with OvHV-2 developed MCF between 24 and 29 days post infection. OvHV-2 DNA levels in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) remained undetectable during the incubation period and increased dramatically a few days before onset of clinical signs. During the clinical stage, we found that predominantly lytic gene expression was detected in PBL and tissues, and both T and B cells were proliferating. The data showed that the viral gene expression profile and lymphoproliferation in rabbits with OvHV-2 induced MCF were different from that in rabbits with AlHV-1 induced MCF, suggesting that OvHV-2 and AlHV-1 may play a different role in MCF pathogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of ovine herpesvirus 2-induced malignant catarrhal fever in rabbits
Li; Cunha, C.W.; Gailbreath, K.L. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 2

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See detailEpidemiology of pestivirus infection in wild ungulates of the French South Alps
Martin, C.; Letellier, C.; Caij, B. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 147(3-4), 320-328

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See detailBovine herpesvirus 4 immediate early 2 (Rta) gene is an essential gene and is duplicated in bovine herpesvirus 4 isolate U.
Franceschi, V.; Capocefalo, A.; Ravanetti, L. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011)

The ORF50/Rta gene has been shown to be an essential gene for many gammaherpesviruses. Although the BoHV-4 ORF50/Rta homolog, immediate early gene 2 (IE2), has been shown to activate several BoHV-4 early ... [more ▼]

The ORF50/Rta gene has been shown to be an essential gene for many gammaherpesviruses. Although the BoHV-4 ORF50/Rta homolog, immediate early gene 2 (IE2), has been shown to activate several BoHV-4 early and late promoters in cotransfection assays, there is no direct proof of its indispensability for progression of the virus to the lytic replication cycle in the context of the viral genome. In the present communication, replication defective BoHV-4-V.test IE2 mutants were efficiently rescued, with respect to production of infectious virus and DNA replication, upon the expression of BoHV-4 ORF50/Rta in trans. Surprisingly, in the course of our studies, we discovered that the IE2 gene is duplicated in the genome of BoHV-4-U. [less ▲]

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See detailQ fever IN JApaN: an update REVIEW
Porter, Sarah ULg; Czaplicki, G.; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 149

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