References of "Veterinary Microbiology"
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See detailReconstruction of the Schmallenberg virus epidemic in Belgium: Complementary use of disease surveillance approaches
Poskin, A; Theron, Léonard ULg; Hanon, JB et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2016), 183

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See detailA retrospective study on equine herpesvirus type-1 associated myeloencephalopathy in France (2008-2011)
Van Galen, G; Leblond, A; Tritz, P et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2015)

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See detailInvestigation of clostridium difficile interspecies relatedness using multilocus sequence typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Avesani, Véronique; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2015)

Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and antimicrobial susceptibility were performed on 37 animal and human C. difficile isolates belonging to 15 ... [more ▼]

Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and antimicrobial susceptibility were performed on 37 animal and human C. difficile isolates belonging to 15 different PCR-ribotypes in order to investigate the relatedness of human and animal isolates and to identify possible transmission routes. MLVA identified a total of 21 different types while MLST only distinguished 12 types. Identical C. difficile strains were detected in the same animal species for PCR-ribotypes 014, 078, UCL 16U and UCL 36, irrespective of their origin or the isolation date. Non clonal strains were found among different hosts; however, a high genetic association between pig and cattle isolates belonging to PCR-ribotype 078 was revealed. MLVA also showed genetic differences that clearly distinguished human from animal strains. For a given PCR-ribotype, human and animal strains presented a similar susceptibility to the antimicrobials tested. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin, metronidazole, chloramphenicol and rifampicin, while PCR-ribotypes 078, UCL 5a, UCL 36 and UCL 103 were associated with erythromycin resistance. The data suggest a wide dissemination of clones at hospitals and breeding-farms or a contamination at the slaughterhouse, but less probability of interspecies transmission. However, further highly discriminatory genotyping methods are necessary to elucidate interspecies and zoonotic transmission of C. difficile. [less ▲]

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See detailPestiviruses infections at the wild and domestic ruminants interface in the French Southern Alps
Martin; Duquesne, V; Adam, G et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2015), 175

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See detailFatal transmission of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia to an Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx)
Chaber, AL; Lignereux, L; Al Qassimi, M et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2014), 173(1-2), 156-159

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See detailFirst isolation and molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Benin
Gorna, K; Houndjè, E; Romey, A et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2014)

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See detailCarriage and acquisition rates of Clostridium difficile in hospitalized horses, including molecular characterization, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Brévers, Bastien et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2014)

lostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the ... [more ▼]

lostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the development of C. difficile infection. Horses admitted to a care unit are therefore at greater risk of being colonized. The aim of this study was to investigate the carriage of C. difficile in hospitalized horses and the possible influence of some risk factors in colonization. During a seven-month period, faecal samples and data relating the clinical history of horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital were collected. C. difficile isolates were characterized through toxin profiles, cytotoxicity activity, PCR-ribotyping, antimicrobial resistance and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ten isolates were obtained with a total of seven different PCR-ribotypes, including PCR-ribotype 014. Five of them were identified as toxinogenic. A high resistance to gentamicin, clindamycin and ceftiofur was found. MLST revealed four different sequencing types (ST), which included ST11, ST26, ST2 and ST15, and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the isolates clustered in the same lineage. Clinical history suggests that horses frequently harbour toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. difficile and that in most cases they are colonized regardless of the reason for hospitalization; the development of diarrhoea is more unusual. [less ▲]

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See detailFeline polymorphonuclear neutrophils produce pro-inflammatory cytokines following exposure to Microsporum canis
Cambier, Ludivine ULg; Mathy, A; Baldo, A et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013), 162(2-4), 800-805

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See detailImportance of identification and typing of Brucellae from West African cattle: a review
Sanogo, M; Abatih, E; Thys, E et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013)

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See detailSubtilisin Sub3 is involved in adherence of Microsporum canis to human and animal epidermis
Bagut, ET; Baldo, A; Mathy, Anne ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2012), 160(3-4), 413-419

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (13 ULg)