References of "Veterinary Microbiology"
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See detailAssociations between properties linked with persistence in a collection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis
Bardiau, Marjorie ULg; Detilleux, Johann; Farnir, Frédéric et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013)

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See detailFeline polymorphonuclear neutrophils produce pro-inflammatory cytokines following exposure to Microsporum canis
Cambier, Ludivine ULg; Mathy, A; Baldo, A et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013), 162(2-4), 800-805

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See detailImportance of identification and typing of Brucellae from West African cattle: a review
Sanogo, M; Abatih, E; Thys, E et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2013)

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See detailSubtilisin Sub3 is involved in adherence of Microsporum canis to human and animal epidermis
Bagut, ET; Baldo, A; Mathy, Anne ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2012), 160(3-4), 413-419

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See detailGenetic and splice variations of Bos taurus CD46 shift cell permissivity to BVDV, the bovine pestivirus.
Zezafoun, Hussein ULg; Decreux, Annabelle; Desmecht, Daniel ULg

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 152(3-4), 315-27

The pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is known to bind to the CD46 molecule, which subsequently promotes entry of the virus. Mapping of the BVD-virion-binding site has shown that two peptides ... [more ▼]

The pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is known to bind to the CD46 molecule, which subsequently promotes entry of the virus. Mapping of the BVD-virion-binding site has shown that two peptides, 66EQIV69 and 82GQVLAL87, located on antiparallel beta sheets in the most distal complement control protein module (CCP1), provide the attachment platform. In the present study, we reveal the existence of ten distinct allelic versions of the CCP1 module, varying significantly in frequency among taurine and indicine races. A complex mRNA splicing pattern was also evidenced for bovine CD46, generating three different serine-threonine-proline segments and five different cytoplasmic domains. The four most frequent allelic variants and the six splice variants were then expressed in BVDV-nonpermissive porcine cells and the quantity of progeny virions generated by each cell preparation was measured 48 h post-infection. As expected, ectopic expression of the 10 bovine CD46 isoforms rendered the PK15 cells permissive to BVDV, as attested by the 100,000-fold greater recovery of virions from these cells than from non-transfected cells. This permissivity increase was significantly lower (-33%, P<0.001) when the canonical CCP1 was replaced with the variant most frequent in zebus, suggesting positive or negative selection of this allele in the latter and in the former, respectively. The predicted secondary structure of this variant suggests that the measured loss of function is due to the disappearance of one of the two beta sheets constituting the BVDV attachment platform. On the other hand we showed that for a given CCP1, the titer recovered at 48 hpi also depended on the nature of the CD46 cytoplasmic domain (P<0.001). This result implies that virus binding generates a cytoplasmic-tail-dependent outside-in signal that determines permissivity to BVDV. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of ovine herpesvirus 2-induced malignant catarrhal fever in rabbits
Li, Hong; Cunha, Cristina W.; Gailbreath, Katherine L. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 150(3-4), 270-7

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal lymphoproliferative disease syndrome primarily of ruminant species, caused by gammaherpesviruses in the genus Macavirus. Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2 ... [more ▼]

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal lymphoproliferative disease syndrome primarily of ruminant species, caused by gammaherpesviruses in the genus Macavirus. Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), carried by sheep, causes sheep-associated MCF worldwide, while Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried by wildebeest, causes wildebeest-associated MCF, mainly in Africa. Diseases in rabbits can be induced by both viruses, which are clinically and pathologically similar; however, recent studies revealed different expression of viral genes associated with latency or lytic replication during clinical disease between the two viruses. In this study, we further characterized experimentally induced MCF in rabbits by nebulization with OvHV-2 from sheep nasal secretions to elucidate the course of viral replication, along with in vivo incorporation of 5-Bromo-2’-Deoxyuridine (BrdU), to evaluate lymphoproliferation. All six rabbits nebulized with OvHV-2 developed MCF between 24 and 29 days post infection. OvHV-2 DNA levels in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) remained undetectable during the incubation period and increased dramatically a few days before onset of clinical signs. During the clinical stage, we found that predominantly lytic gene expression was detected in PBL and tissues, and both T and B cells were proliferating. The data showed that the viral gene expression profile and lymphoproliferation in rabbits with OvHV-2 induced MCF were different from that in rabbits with AlHV-1 induced MCF, suggesting that OvHV-2 and AlHV-1 may play a different role in MCF pathogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailQ fever IN JApaN: an update REVIEW
Porter, Sarah ULg; Czaplicki, G.; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 149

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See detailCharacterization of ovine herpesvirus 2-induced malignant catarrhal fever in rabbits
Li; Cunha, C.W.; Gailbreath, K.L. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 2

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See detailEpidemiology of pestivirus infection in wild ungulates of the French South Alps
Martin, C.; Letellier, C.; Caij, B. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 147(3-4), 320-328

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See detailBovine herpesvirus 4 immediate early 2 (Rta) gene is an essential gene and is duplicated in bovine herpesvirus 4 isolate U.
Franceschi, V.; Capocefalo, A.; Ravanetti, L. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011)

The ORF50/Rta gene has been shown to be an essential gene for many gammaherpesviruses. Although the BoHV-4 ORF50/Rta homolog, immediate early gene 2 (IE2), has been shown to activate several BoHV-4 early ... [more ▼]

The ORF50/Rta gene has been shown to be an essential gene for many gammaherpesviruses. Although the BoHV-4 ORF50/Rta homolog, immediate early gene 2 (IE2), has been shown to activate several BoHV-4 early and late promoters in cotransfection assays, there is no direct proof of its indispensability for progression of the virus to the lytic replication cycle in the context of the viral genome. In the present communication, replication defective BoHV-4-V.test IE2 mutants were efficiently rescued, with respect to production of infectious virus and DNA replication, upon the expression of BoHV-4 ORF50/Rta in trans. Surprisingly, in the course of our studies, we discovered that the IE2 gene is duplicated in the genome of BoHV-4-U. [less ▲]

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See detailCervid herpesvirus 2 infection in reindeer : a review
das Neves, C.; Rot, S.; Rimstad, E. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2010), 143

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See detailDetection of bovine leukemia virus specific antibodies using recombinant p24-ELISA.
Gutierrez, G.; Alvarez, I.; Fondevila, N. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2009), 137(3-4), 224-34

We developed an indirect ELISA test (rp24-ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against the p24 capsid protein of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in bovine serum samples. A recombinant p24 (rp24) was ... [more ▼]

We developed an indirect ELISA test (rp24-ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against the p24 capsid protein of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) in bovine serum samples. A recombinant p24 (rp24) was expressed in the Escherichia coli expression system, purified in a nickel charged resin and used as antigen in the ELISA test. A cut-off point was established considering the distribution of reactivity values obtained by rp24-ELISA on a set of 555 field serum samples that were stated as double positive (DP) or double negative (DN) by the combination of commercial agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) assay and gp51-ELISA tests results. The rp24-ELISA showed good concordance with the agar gel immunodiffusion assay, when 710 serum samples were analyzed. In addition, rp24-ELISA demonstrated to be a precise assay with good repeatability and reproducibility and a better analytical sensitivity than AGID. From 67 discordant rp24-ELISA-AGID sera, 4 negative reactors were from the DP group, 28 positive samples were from the DN group and 35 positive samples were stated as negative by AGID but positive by the gp51-ELISA. Samples from this last subgroup were sent to an OIE reference laboratory where 28 samples were stated as negative, 5 samples were stated as positive and 2 as inconclusive. Complete concordance with blind previous results from an international proficiency test panel confirmed the capability of the assay to discriminate between infected and non-infected animals. In conclusion, the rp24-ELISA developed and standardized demonstrated to have good analytical characteristics to be considered for screening of BLV. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental reproduction of bluetongue virus serotype 8 clinical disease in calves.
Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; De Clercq, Kris; Guyot, Hugues ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2009), 136(3-4), 352-8

Cattle are commonly subclinically infected following natural or experimental infection with bluetongue virus (BTV). The introduction of BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe has been characterized by the ... [more ▼]

Cattle are commonly subclinically infected following natural or experimental infection with bluetongue virus (BTV). The introduction of BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe has been characterized by the manifestation of clinical signs in infected cattle. In order to study the pathogenesis of BTV-8 in this host, an animal model able to reproduce the clinical manifestations of the disease is required. In this work, two calves were subcutaneously and intravenously injected with a low passage cell-adapted strain of BTV-8. Both calves showed typical bluetongue clinical signs, including pyrexia, ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, oral mucosal congestion, development of ulcers and necrotic lesions on the lips and tongue, submandibular oedema, coronitis and oedema of the coronet and pastern region. A score was assigned depending on the severity of the lesions and a total clinical score was calculated for each animal daily and at the end of the experiment. Both calves became viraemic 24h post-infection and seroconversion occurred between 7 and 11 days P.I. In this study we present the development of a protocol of infection in calves able to reproduce the severity of the lesions observed with BTV-8 in field conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic factors affecting susceptibility to udder pathogens
Detilleux, Johann ULg

in Veterinary Microbiology (2009), 134(1-2), 157-164

Many studies have identified genetic factors underlying resistance or susceptibility to mastitis in dairy cows and heifers. Some authors focused on polygenic variation while others searched for genes and ... [more ▼]

Many studies have identified genetic factors underlying resistance or susceptibility to mastitis in dairy cows and heifers. Some authors focused on polygenic variation while others searched for genes and/or quantitative trait loci with major effects on mastitis. Classical traits related to mastitis include somatic cell counts, electrical conductivity and clinical cases of the disease. With the development of automatic milking devices and '-omics' technologies, new traits are considered, such as acute phase proteins, immunological assays, and milk flow patterns, and new biological pathways are discovered, for example the role of mammary epithelium and the nervous system. The usefulness of these traits for the identification of resistant cows is discussed in relation to the biological mechanisms underlying the development of the disease. In addition, the utility of these traits for genetic improvement is reviewed. Finally, the problem of durability in resistance is addressed, including co-evolution and the cost of resistance. [less ▲]

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