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See detailCytokine and transcription factor expression by Aspergillus fumigatus-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells in dogs with sino-nasal aspergillosis
Vanherberghen, Morgane; Bureau, Fabrice ULg; Peters, I.R. et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2013), 154(3-4), 111-20

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See detailExperimental model of equine alveolar macrophage stimulation with TLR ligands.
Waldschmidt, Ingrid; Pirottin, Dimitri ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2013), 155(1-2), 30-37

Pulmonary diseases are common in horses and have a major economic impact on the equine industry. Some of them could be associated with an inadequate immune response in the lung, but methods to evaluate ... [more ▼]

Pulmonary diseases are common in horses and have a major economic impact on the equine industry. Some of them could be associated with an inadequate immune response in the lung, but methods to evaluate this response in horses are lacking. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an experimental model that could be applied in several physiological and pathological conditions to assess the innate immune response of equine pulmonary cells. Equine alveolar macrophages (AMs) obtained from bronchoalveolar lavages were isolated from other cells by adhesion. TLR2, 3, and 4 expression in AMs was studied and their responses to commercial ligands (respectively FSL-1, Poly(I:C), and LPS) were evaluated after determination of the appropriate dose and time of incubation. TLR responses were assessed by measuring cytokine production using (1) gene expression of TNFalpha, IFNbeta, Il-1beta, and IFNalpha by qPCR (indirect method); and (2) cytokine production for TNFalpha and IFNbeta by ELISA (direct method). TLR 2, 3, and 4 were expressed by AMs. TLR 2 stimulation with 10ng/mL of FSL-1 during 3h significantly increased IL-1beta and TNFalpha gene expression. TLR 3 stimulation with 1000ng/mL of Poly(I:C) during 1h increased IFNbeta, IFNalpha, Il-1beta and TNFalpha expression. TLR 4 stimulation with 100ng/mL of LPS during 3h increased TNFalpha, IFNbeta, and Il-1beta expression. Results obtained by ELISA quantification of TNFalpha and IFNbeta produced by AMs following stimulation during 6h were similar: FSL-1 increased TNFalpha production but not IFNbeta, Poly(I:C) and LPS increased production of IFNbeta and TNFalpha. In conclusion, pulmonary innate immunity of horses can be assessed ex vivo by measuring cytokine production following stimulation of AMs with TLR agonists. This experimental model could be applied under several conditions especially to improve the understanding of equine respiratory disease pathogenesis, and to suggest novel therapeutic opportunities. [less ▲]

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See detailEscherichia coli virulence factors
Mainil, Jacques ULg

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2013), 152

Escherichia coli was described in 1885 by a German pediatrician, Theodor Escherich, in the faeces of a child suffering diarrhoea. In 1893, a Danish veterinarian postulated that the E. coli species ... [more ▼]

Escherichia coli was described in 1885 by a German pediatrician, Theodor Escherich, in the faeces of a child suffering diarrhoea. In 1893, a Danish veterinarian postulated that the E. coli species comprises different strains, some being pathogens, others not. Today the E. coli species is subdivided into several pathogenic strains causing different intestinal, urinary tract or internal infections and pathologies, in animal species and in humans. Since this congress topic is the interaction between E. coli and the mucosal immune system, the purpose of this manuscript is to present different classes of adhesins (fimbrial adhesins, afimbrial adhesins and outer membrane proteins), the type 3 secretion system, and some toxins (oligopeptide, AB, and RTX pore-forming toxins) produced by E. coli, that can directly interact with the epithelial cells of the intestinal, respiratory and urinary tracts. [less ▲]

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See detailAn in vitro whole blood model to test the effects of different stimuli conditions on the release of myeloperoxidase and elastase by equine neutrophils.
Ceusters, Justine ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg; MINGUET, Grégory ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2012), 150(3-4), 221-7

Horses are particularly sensitive and exposed to excessive inflammatory responses evolving toward an important stimulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). The aim of this work was to stimulate ... [more ▼]

Horses are particularly sensitive and exposed to excessive inflammatory responses evolving toward an important stimulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). The aim of this work was to stimulate equine neutrophils in whole blood and to evaluate their response by measuring the release of total and active myeloperoxidase (MPO) and total elastase, considered as markers of neutrophil stimulation and degranulation. Because of the critical importance of the concomitant presence of LPS and TNF-alpha in equine pathological situations, we combined these two natural mediators to stimulate PMN and compared the response with those obtained after the PMN stimulation with each mediator used alone and well-known artificial stimulation systems such as 12-phorbol 13-myristate acetate (PMA) and the combination of cytochalasin B (CB) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). All the activation systems, PMA, CB/fMLP, TNF-alpha, LPS and LPS/TNF-alpha, induced a significant release of total MPO in whole blood but only the combinations CB/fMLP and LPS/TNF-alpha significantly favored the release of active MPO. Regarding the total elastase, we did not observe a significant release in all the stimulated conditions except with PMA. It appears clearly that the choice of the neutrophil stimulation model is fundamental for the selection of potentially active pharmacological agents, especially on MPO activity. [less ▲]

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See detailToll- and NOD-like receptor mRNA expression in canine sino-nasal aspergillosis and idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis
Mercier, Elise ULg; Peters, Iain; Clercx, Cécile ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2012), 145(3-4), 618-624

The pathogenesis of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) and lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis (LPR) remains poorly understood. The innate immune system is implicated in the etiology of human chronic ... [more ▼]

The pathogenesis of canine sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) and lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis (LPR) remains poorly understood. The innate immune system is implicated in the etiology of human chronic rhinosinusitis. Therefore, we hypothesized that dysfunction in innate immunity could be implicated in the pathogenesis of SNA and LPR. Expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1 to 10 and NOD-like receptors (NODs) 1 and 2 in nasal mucosal biopsies from SNA or LPR dogs was compared with mucosa from healthy controls. Gene expression was quantified using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction normalized against multiple housekeeper genes. All TLR and NOD genes were quantified in all samples. SNA was associated with significantly increased expression of TLRs 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10; and NOD2, relative to controls. LPR was associated with significantly increased expression of TLRs 1, 2, 6, 7 and 8, relative to controls. There was significantly more expression of TLRs 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and NOD2 in SNA dogs than in LPR dogs. The significance of these differences in the pathogenesis of these diseases is yet to be determined. [less ▲]

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See detailFeatures of follicular dendritic cells in ovine pharyngeal tonsil: An in vivo and in vitro study in the context of scrapie pathogenesis
Toppets, Vinciane ULg; Defaweux, Valérie ULg; Piret, Joëlle ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2011), 141

Although the alimentary tract has been suggested as the most likely portal of entry in natural scrapie, a growing amount of data indicates that the respiratory system and more specifically the pharyngeal ... [more ▼]

Although the alimentary tract has been suggested as the most likely portal of entry in natural scrapie, a growing amount of data indicates that the respiratory system and more specifically the pharyngeal tonsils serve as a natural portal of entry for scrapie. This study describes for the first time the broad cell populations in the lymphoid compartment of pharyngeal tonsils and more specifically inside the lymphoid follicles where the scrapie agent accumulates during the period of latency. Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), stromal cells located in the light zone of the germinal centre of lymphoid follicles, seem to be the principal causal factor in the accumulation of the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases. Knowing that efficient lymphoreticular prion propagation requires PrPc expression, we analysed the expression of PrPc with the mouse monoclonal antibody Pri 909 both in situ and on FDC-cluster-enriched cell suspensions. In situ, a positive staining was observed in the germinal centre of pharyngeal lymph follicles. The germinal centre labelling was due to the presence of a follicular dendritic network as revealed after immunogold staining of isolated FDC clusters. Our results suggest that the pharyngeal lymphoreticular system and more specifically PrPc expressing follicular dendritic cells could serve as a prion “reservoir” during the latency phase, thus playing a key role during the scrapie lymphoinvasion. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow cytometric detection of myeloperoxidase in horse neutrophils: a novel technique in equine diagnostic research.
Wauters, Jella; Franck, Thierry ULg; Pille, Frederik et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2011), 144(3-4), 417-22

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a protein of interest due to its involvement in equine pathologies. Until now, results in equine diagnostic research were achieved through extracellular MPO detection. However ... [more ▼]

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a protein of interest due to its involvement in equine pathologies. Until now, results in equine diagnostic research were achieved through extracellular MPO detection. However, studying the cellular MPO content in neutrophils has revealed important insights in human diseases. This study aimed to develop a technique for the specific detection of MPO on the single cell level defining a flow cytometric protocol for the detection of both equine surface-bound and cellular MPO. Both indirect and direct labeling techniques are described which include the comparison of two secondary antibodies and two linking-fluorochromes, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunohistochemical investigation of cells expressing CD21, membrane IgM, CD32, and a follicular dendritic cell marker in the lymphoid tissues of neonatal calves
Chattha, K. S.; Hodgins, D. C.; DeLay, J. et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2010), 137

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See detailDevelopment of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for equine neutrophil elastase measurement in blood: Preliminary application to colic cases.
de la Rebière de Pouyade, Geoffroy ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg; Salciccia, Alexandra ULg et al

in Veterinary immunology and immunopathology (2010)

Equine neutrophil elastase (NE) is a protease released in inflammatory diseases and participating in tissue destruction. To measure NE in horse plasma to assess its role in pathological conditions, we ... [more ▼]

Equine neutrophil elastase (NE) is a protease released in inflammatory diseases and participating in tissue destruction. To measure NE in horse plasma to assess its role in pathological conditions, we purified elastase from equine neutrophils by a double step chromatography and obtained a pure protein of 27kDa, 4kDa smaller than the NE 2A previously purified (Scudamore et al., 1993; Dagleish et al., 1999), which was likely to be NE 2B. We developed an ELISA by using two specific polyclonal antibodies obtained from rabbit and guinea pig. The sandwich complex was detected using a secondary antibody conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. The ELISA showed good precision and accuracy, with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation below 10% for equine NE concentrations ranging from 1.875 to 60ng/ml. A stable plasma NE value, unaffected by the delay of centrifugation (over 4h), was obtained with plasma from EDTA anticoagulated blood. The mean value (+/-SEM) measured in 37 healthy horses was 32.53+/-4.6ng/ml. NE level in plasma of horses with colic at the time of admission was significantly higher than in healthy horses. Our results indicate that the ELISA technique we developed to measure plasmatic NE is a powerful tool for studying the role of elastase in equine inflammatory disease. In future, the application will be extended to other equine biological fluids. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression microarrays in equine sciences
Ramery, Eve ULg; Closset, Rodrigue; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2009), 127(3-4), 197-202

Microarrays have become an important research tool for life science researchers. Expression microarrays are capable of profiling the gene expression pattern of tens of thousands of genes in a single ... [more ▼]

Microarrays have become an important research tool for life science researchers. Expression microarrays are capable of profiling the gene expression pattern of tens of thousands of genes in a single experiment. It appears to be the platform of choice for parallel gene expression profiling. Various equine-specific gene expression microarrays have been generated and used. However, homologous microarrays are not yet commercially available for the horse. An alternative is the use of heterologous microarrays, mainly microarrays specific for mice or humans. Although the use of microarrays in equine research is still in its infancy, gene expression microarrays have shown their potential in equine research. This review presents the previous, current and potential use of expression microarrays in equine research. [less ▲]

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See detailActivation of equine neutrophils by phorbol myristate acetate or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine induces a different response in reactive oxygen species production and release of active myeloperoxidase.
Franck, Thierry ULg; Kohnen, Stéphane; de la Rebière de Pouyade, Geoffroy ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2009)

Neutrophil (PMN) contribution to the acute inflammatory processes may lead to an excessive generation of reactive oxygen metabolites species (ROS) and secretion of granule enzymes. We compared the effects ... [more ▼]

Neutrophil (PMN) contribution to the acute inflammatory processes may lead to an excessive generation of reactive oxygen metabolites species (ROS) and secretion of granule enzymes. We compared the effects of either phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) in combination with a pre-treatment by cytochalasin B (CB) on the production of ROS and the release of total and active myeloperoxidase (MPO) by isolated equine PMNs. The ROS production was assessed by lucigenin dependent chemiluminescence (CL) and ethylene release by alpha-keto-gamma-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) oxidation. In the supernatant of activated PMNs, total equine MPO was measured by ELISA and active MPO by the SIEFED (Specific Immunologic Extraction Followed by Enzymatic Detection) technique that allows for the study of the interaction of a compound directly with the enzyme. The stimulation of PMNs with CB-fMLP only modestly increased the release of MPO, but more than 70% of released MPO was active. PMA stimulation markedly increased the production of ROS and release of MPO, but more than 95% of released MPO was inactive. When PMNs were pre-incubated with superoxide dismutase (SOD) prior to PMA activation, the lucigenin enhanced CL, which is linked to the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) production, was much more decreased than KMB oxidation, linked to the hydroxyl-like radical production. The addition of SOD prior to the activation of PMNs by PMA also limited the loss of the activity of released MPO. These results confirm the key role of O(2)(-) generation in the ROS cascade in PMN and reveal its critical role on MPO inactivation. [less ▲]

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See detailEquine neutrophil elastase in plasma, laminar tissue, and skin of horses administered black walnut heartwood extract.
de la Rebière de Pouyade, Geoffroy ULg; Riggs, L. M.; Moore, J. N. et al

in Veterinary immunology and immunopathology (2009)

Laminitis is a local manifestation of a systemic inflammatory response that is characterized by neutrophil activation and movement of neutrophils into the laminar tissues. Given the evidence for the ... [more ▼]

Laminitis is a local manifestation of a systemic inflammatory response that is characterized by neutrophil activation and movement of neutrophils into the laminar tissues. Given the evidence for the involvement of neutrophils in the development of laminitis, we measured concentrations of neutrophil elastase, a serine protease released from the azurophilic granules of neutrophils, in plasma, skin and laminar tissues obtained from control horses and horses given black walnut heartwood extract (BWHE) to induce laminitis. Healthy horses (5-15 years old) were randomly assigned to 4 groups: 3 experimental groups given BWHE via nasogastric tube, and a control group given an equal volume of water. The experimental groups consisted of horses euthanized 1.5h (n=5), 3h (n=6) or 12h (n=10) after BWHE administration. Control horses (n=7) were euthanized 12h after intragastric administration of water. Plasma samples were collected in all horses of the control and 12h BWHE groups at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12h after treatment, and laminar tissue and skin from the middle region of the neck were harvested at the time of euthanasia in all 1.5 and 3h BWHE horses, in 6 of the 12h BWHE horses and in 5 of the control horses. Plasma and tissue concentrations of neutrophil elastase were determined using an equine specific ELISA, and statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Plasma concentrations of neutrophil elastase in the BWHE group were significantly higher at 6 and 8h compared to the control group and at 8 and 10h compared to time 0. Concentrations of neutrophil elastase in skin and laminar tissue were significantly higher in the 3 and 12h BWHE groups compared to the control group. Concentrations of neutrophil elastase were significantly higher in the skin than in the lamina in the 12h BWHE horses. The administration of BWHE thus results in significant increases in the concentration of neutrophil elastase in the circulation, skin and laminar tissue. These results confirm a role for neutrophils in the developmental phase of laminitis, and the systemic nature of the inflammatory process. Furthermore, neutrophil elastase may play a key role in the disintegration of the hoof basal membrane and be a target for the development of new treatments for laminitis. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of an antibody panel for immunohistochemical analysis of canine muscle cells
Gofflot, Stéphanie ULg; Kischel, Philippe ULg; Thielen, Caroline ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2008), 125(3-4), 225-33

Immunohistochemistry is an indispensable tool in the assessment and characterization of lineage-specific differentiation of grafted cells in cell-based-therapy. This strategy is under investigation for ... [more ▼]

Immunohistochemistry is an indispensable tool in the assessment and characterization of lineage-specific differentiation of grafted cells in cell-based-therapy. This strategy is under investigation for the treatment of many muscle disorders and different animals such as dogs are used as models to study the tissue regeneration. The aim of the present study was to characterize an antibody panel for the analysis of canine muscle cells, useful in routinely processed formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Overall, 12 antibodies (8 mouse monoclonal and 4 goat polyclonal), validated for use on human tissues tested for cross-reactivity on canine smooth muscle (bladder, intestine, and uterus), skeletal muscle and heart. Specific staining was achieved with eight antibodies, of which six were cytoplasmic markers (desmin, HDAC8, MHC, SMA, Troponin I and Troponin T) and two were cardiac nuclear markers (GATA-4 and Nkx-2.5). This antibody panel may be useful not only for the evaluation of cell-based therapies in muscle disorders, but also for the evaluation of canine soft tissue neoplasms in veterinary pathology. [less ▲]

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See detailReport of the 3rd Havemeyer workshop on allergic diseases of the Horse, Holar, Iceland, June 2007
Marti, E.; Gerber, V.; Wilson, A. D. et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2008), 126(3-4), 351-361

Allergic diseases occur in most mammals, although some species such as humans, dogs and horses seem to be more prone to develop allergies than others. In horses, insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH), an ... [more ▼]

Allergic diseases occur in most mammals, although some species such as humans, dogs and horses seem to be more prone to develop allergies than others. In horses, insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH), an allergic dermatitis caused by bites of midges, and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), a hyperreactivity to stable born dust and allergens, are the two most prevalent allergic diseases. Allergic diseases involve the interaction of three major factors: (i) genetic constitution, (ii) exposure to allergens, and (iii) a dysregulation of the immune response determined by (i) and (ii). However, other environmental factors such as infectious diseases, contact with endotoxin and degree of infestation with endoparasites have been shown to influence the prevalence of allergic diseases in humans. How these factors may impact upon allergic disease in the horse is unknown at this time. The 3rd workshop on Allergic Diseases of the Horse, with major sponsorship from the Havemeyer Foundation, was held in Holar, Iceland, in June 2007 and focussed on immunological and genetic aspects of IBH and RAO. This particular venue was chosen because of the prevalence of IBH in exported Icelandic horses. The incidence of IBH is significantly different between Icelandic horses born in Europe or North America and those born in Iceland and exported as adults. Although the genetic factors and allergens are the same, exported adult horses show a greater incidence of IBH. This suggests that environmental or epigenetic factors may contribute to this response. This report summarizes the present state of knowledge and summarizes important issues discussed at the workshop. [less ▲]

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See detailPartial divergence of cytokine mRNA expression in bronchial tissues compared to bronchoalveolar lavage cells in horses with recurrent airway obstruction.
Riihimaki, M.; Raine, Amanda; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2008), 122(3-4), 256-64

The aim of this study was to investigate mRNA levels of cytokines in bronchial epithelium in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) during acute crisis and remission. Additionally, cytokine mRNA ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate mRNA levels of cytokines in bronchial epithelium in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) during acute crisis and remission. Additionally, cytokine mRNA levels in endobronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells were compared. Seven RAO horses were examined while in respiratory crisis following provocation and again while in remission after 2 months on pasture, during which time six healthy horses on pasture were also examined. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to assess mRNA expression for cytokines IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17 and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) in endobronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of IL-8 mRNA was significantly upregulated during crisis in both endobronchial biopsies and BAL cells (p=0.036), while there was a similar trend for upregulation of IL-10 mRNA only in BAL cells that approached significance (p=0.059). Moreover, during crisis the expression of IL-8 mRNA in BAL cells was positively correlated to relative IL-6 mRNA expression (r(s)=0.971, p=0.001) and bronchial epithelial expression of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 mRNA were positively correlated (r(s)=0.943, p=0.005). In comparing the relationship of mRNA expression in BAL to biopsy in individual RAO horses, there was a positive correlation with IL-6 to IL-8 mRNA expression in BAL during respiratory crisis (r(s)=0.971, p=0.001) that also correlated positively with IL-8 expression in biopsies on pasture (r(s)=0.986, p<0.0001 for both). Regarding RAO horses at pasture versus controls neither the cytokine mRNA levels in endobronchial biopsy nor in BAL cells differed significantly. These results further support previous findings that IL-8 mRNA in both BAL cells and bronchial epithelium is upregulated in RAO horses during crisis. However, apart from IL-8, it appears that expression of other cytokines, including IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and TGF-beta1 in bronchial epithelium does not necessarily mirror cytokine expression in BAL cells in individual horses with RAO. Accordingly, examination of markers of inflammation in endobronchial tissue provides complementary but not necessarily identical information to that obtained in BAL cells. Given the potential for repeated sampling over time bronchial biopsy can serve as an invaluable additional tool for investigation of time-dependent changes in inflammatory process in this animal model of asthma. [less ▲]

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See detailEmphasis on cell turnover in two hosts infected by bovine leukemia virus: a rationale for host susceptibility to disease.
Florins, Arnaud-Francois ULg; Boxus, Mathieu ULg; Vandermeers, Fabian ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2008), 125(1-2), 1-7

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a deltaretrovirus that infects and induces accumulation of B-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues of cattle, leading to leukemia/lymphoma. BLV can also ... [more ▼]

Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a deltaretrovirus that infects and induces accumulation of B-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues of cattle, leading to leukemia/lymphoma. BLV can also be experimentally transmitted to sheep, in which disease appears earlier and at higher frequencies. Abnormal accumulation of leukemic B-lymphocytes results from an alteration of different parameters that include cell proliferation and death as well as migration to lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, B lymphocyte turnover is increased in BLV-infected sheep but reduced in cattle, revealing a potential relationship between cell kinetics and disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and application of multiple internal reference (housekeeper) gene assays for accurate normalisation of canine gene expression studies
Peters, I. R.; Peeters, Dominique ULg; Helps, C. R. et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2007), 117(1-2), 55-66

Measurement of mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) has proven to be an important and powerful tool for the investigation of the pathogenesis of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases in many ... [more ▼]

Measurement of mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) has proven to be an important and powerful tool for the investigation of the pathogenesis of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases in many species. This methodology has proven particularly valuable in the dog, a species for which there are currently few specific antibodies for measurement of relevant proteins. Internal control (housekeeper) mRNAs are widely used for normalisation of QRT-PCR results. The validation and use of multiple internal control mRNAs for increased accuracy of normalisation has been described for humans and rodents. The aims of this study were to develop QRT-PCR assays for 11 potential internal control mRNAs in the dog (ACTB, B2M, G3PDH, HMBS, HPRT1, RPL 13A, RPL32, RPS 18, SDHA, TBP and YWAZ) and validate their use with bone marrow, colon, duodenum, heart, kidney, liver, lung, lymph node, skeletal muscle, pancreas, spleen and stomach from seven dogs. Endoscopic biopsies of the superficial duodenal mucosa were also obtained from nine dogs suffering from chronic gastro-oesophageal disease. The most stably expressed genes varied in the tissues examined. RPL13A and RPL32 (both components of the 60S ribosomal subunit) were the most stably expressed genes in the majority of the tissues examined, whereas ACTB and B2M were the least stable. Distinct internal control genes were shown to be most appropriate for use in full-thickness versus superficial mucosal biopsies of the duodenum. The results of this study indicate that there are no universal control genes for gene expression studies in canine tissues. It is important to use multiple internal control genes based upon a survey of potential control genes applied to representative samples from different disease groups, culture conditions and/or time points in an experimental study. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDistinct tissue cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression in canine sino-nasal aspergillosis and idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis
Peeters, Dominique ULg; Peters, I. R.; Helps, C. R. et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2007), 117

Idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis (LPR) and sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) are among the most common causes of nasal discharge in dogs. The pathogenesis of both diseases is poorly understood. Some ... [more ▼]

Idiopathic lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis (LPR) and sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) are among the most common causes of nasal discharge in dogs. The pathogenesis of both diseases is poorly understood. Some have proposed that LPR is a chronic inflammatory response to an inhaled irritant, pollutant or allergen, but others suggest that most cases of LPR constitute undiagnosed cases of SNA. Local immune dysfunction is thought to permit opportunist infection in canine SNA. This study investigates the nature of the local tissue immune response mounted in canine LPR and SNA in order to determine whether these diseases have similar or distinct pathogenesis. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was carried out on RNA isolated from nasal biopsies from diseased and control dogs, using specific assays designed to amplify messenger RNA (mRNA), encoding a panel of cytokines and chemokines. SNA was associated with significantly increased expression of mRNA encoding interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p19, IL-12p35, IL-12p40, IL-18, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, eotaxin-2 and all four monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCPs) relative to controls. LPR was associated with significantly increased expression of mRNA encoding IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p19, IL12p40, IL-18, TNF-alpha, TGF-(3, MCP-2 and MCP-3 relative to controls. There was significantly more expression of mRNA encoding IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p35, IL-12p40, IL-18, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, TGF-(3 and all MCPs, and significantly less expression of IL-5 in dogs with SNA than in dogs with LPR. Thus, the profile of cytokine and chemokine gene expression in the nasal mucosa is different in dogs with LPR when compared to dogs with SNA. A partial Th2 immune response appears to be mounted in the nasal mucosa of dogs with LPR, whereas the mucosal immune response in canine SNA is of the Th1 type. Increase in IL-10 and TGF-(3 transcripts in dogs with SNA is thought to be implicated in the failure to clear the Aspergillus infection. These results constitute the first evidence that the pathogenesis of canine LPR and SNA is distinct. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailReal-time RT-PCR quantification of mRNA encoding cytokines, CC chemokines and CCR3 in bronchial biopsies from dogs with eosinophilic bronchopneurnopathy
Peeters, Dominique ULg; Peters, I. R.; Clercx, Cécile ULg et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2006), 110(1-2), 65-77

Idiopathic canine eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy (EBP) is a disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the pulmonary interstitium and bronchial mucosa, a cause for which has not yet been ... [more ▼]

Idiopathic canine eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy (EBP) is a disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the pulmonary interstitium and bronchial mucosa, a cause for which has not yet been discovered. A recent study, examining the relative proportion of various lymphocyte cell subsets within bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from dogs with EBP, has shown a selective increase in CD4(+) T-cells and a selective decrease in CD8(+) T-cells, suggesting that a similar Th2 immune response might occur in EBP. The aim of the present study was to determine the profile of cytokine, chemokine and CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in bronchial tissue from dogs with EBP. Real-time RT-PCR assays were used for the quantification of mRNA encoding for a panel of cytokines, CC chemokines and CCR3 in perendoscopic bronchial biopsies from eight dogs with EBP and seven age-matched control dogs. Messenger RNA transcribed from the housekeeping gene glyceraldehyde-3 -phosphate dehydrogenase was used for normalisation of the threshold cycle in order to determine the relative copy numbers of the transcripts. No significant difference in the expression of any cytokine, MCP-1, -2, -4 and CCR3 was found between control and EBP dogs. The expression of transcript for MCP-3, eotaxin-2 and -3 was significantly greater in bronchial biopsies from dogs with EBP than in samples from control dogs while there was significantly less mRNA encoding RANTES in the mucosa of dogs with EBP. In conclusion, the cytokine mRNA expression profile in perendoscopic bronchial biopsies is similar in dogs with EBP and dogs without respiratory disease. Further studies on the quantification of mRNA encoding cytokines in isolated T lymphocytes from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or bronchial biopsies are needed before any conclusion on the cytokine profile in canine EBP can be drawn. Eotaxin-2, -3 and MCP-3 appear to be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDNA binding activity of transcription factors in bronchial cells of horses with recurrent airway obstruction.
Couetil, Laurent L; Art, Tatiana ULg; De Moffarts, Brieuc et al

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2006), 113(1-2), 11-20

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB ... [more ▼]

Horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) present many similarities with human asthmatics including airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, reversible obstruction, and increased NF-kappaB expression. Studies in experimental asthma models have shown that transcriptions factors such as activator protein-1 (AP-1), GATA-3, cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) may also play an important role in airway inflammation. The purpose of this study was to measure DNA binding activity of these transcription factors in the airways of horses with RAO and to compare it to pulmonary function and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cytology. Seven horses with RAO and six control animals were studied during a moldy hay challenge and after 2 months at pasture. Pulmonary function, BALF cytology and transcription factors' activities in bronchial brushings were measured during hay and pasture exposures. During moldy hay challenge, RAO-affected horses developed severe airway obstruction and inflammation and a significantly higher airway AP-1 binding activity than in controls. After 2 months on pasture, pulmonary function and airway AP-1 binding activity were not different between RAO and control horses. The DNA binding activity of CREB in airways of RAO-affected horses increased significantly after 2 months at pasture and became higher than in controls. A significant positive correlation was detected between AP-1 binding activity and indicators of airway obstruction and inflammation. Airway GATA-3, CEBP and CREB binding activities were negatively correlated with indices of airway obstruction. However, contrarily to CREB binding activity, GATA-3 and CEBP binding activities were not different between RAO and control horses and were unaffected by changes in environment. These data support the view that AP-1 and CREB play a role in modulating airway inflammation in horses with RAO [less ▲]

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