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See detailAerial surveys using an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS): comparison of different methods for estimating the surface area of sampling strips
Lisein, Jonathan ULg; Linchant, Julie ULg; Lejeune, Philippe ULg et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2013), 6(4), 506-520

Conservation of natural ecosystems requires regular monitoring of biodiversity, including the estimation of wildlife density. Recently, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have become more available for ... [more ▼]

Conservation of natural ecosystems requires regular monitoring of biodiversity, including the estimation of wildlife density. Recently, unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have become more available for numerous civilian applications. The use of small drones for wildlife surveys as a surrogate for manned aerial surveys is becoming increasingly attractive and has already been implemented with some success. This raises the question of how to process UAS imagery in order to determine the surface area of sampling strips within an acceptable confidence level. For the purpose of wildlife surveys, the estimation of sampling strip surface area needs to be both accurate and quick, and easy to implement. As GPS and an inertial measurement units are commonly integrated within unmanned aircraft platforms, two methods of direct georeferencing were compared here. On the one hand, we used the image footprint projection (IFP) method, which utilizes collinearity equations on each image individually. On the other hand, the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique was used for block orientation and georeferencing. These two methods were compared on eight sampling strips. An absolute orientation of the strip was determined by indirect georeferencing using ground control points. This absolute orientation was considered as the reference and was used for validating the other two methods. The IFP method was demonstrated to be the most accurate and the easiest to implement. It was also found to be less demanding in terms of image quality and overlap. However, even though a flat landscape is the type most widely encountered in wildlife surveys in Africa, we recommend estimating IFP sensitivity at an accentuation of the relief. [less ▲]

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See detailAnthropisation et effets de lisière: impacts sur la diversité des rongeurs dans la Réserve forestière de Masako (Kisangani, R.D. Congo)
Iyongo Waya Mongo, L; Visser, M; De Cannière, C et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2012), 5(3), 270-283

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See detailHousehold bushmeat consumption in Brazzaville, the Republic of the Congo.
Mbete, Roger Albert; Banga-Mboko, Henri; Racey, Paul et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2011), 4(2), 187-202

Wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban populations in Congo. Quantitative and qualitative surveys on the consumption of bushmeat were undertaken in Brazzaville in 2006 ... [more ▼]

Wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban populations in Congo. Quantitative and qualitative surveys on the consumption of bushmeat were undertaken in Brazzaville in 2006, in about 1,050 urban households. The main objective was to establish the profiles of consumers and of species concerned. The results showed that 88.3% of the surveyed households consumed bushmeat. Their average size was 5.7 ± 3.2 persons. The average monthly income of an urban consumer with a permanent job was 98,334 (US$197) ± 84,306 (US$169) FCFA. It appeared that households preferred to consume bushmeat for two major reasons: the taste or flavor (67.8%) and food habits (14.7%). Meat from mammals was preferred, the top three orders of this class being artiodactyls (48.3%), rodents (28.3%), and primates (13.0%). Some of them are listed as threatened in Congo Brazzaville and are included in the IUCN Red List. The results showed that in Brazzaville, bushmeat consumption remains important and is determined by socio-economic parameters. The promotion of game farming, and breeding of domestic species such as poultry and fish, in the Brazzaville suburbs could help to meet Congolese demand for bushmeat. [less ▲]

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See detailProfil des vendeurs de viande de chasse et évaluation de la biomasse commercialisée dans les marchés municipaux de Brazzaville, Congo.
Mbete, Roger Albert; Banga-Mboko, Henri; Ngokaka, Christophe et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2011), 4(2), 203-217

The consumption of wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban population in Congo. A survey on bushmeat trade was undertaken in 21 municipal markets during four weeks, in ... [more ▼]

The consumption of wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban population in Congo. A survey on bushmeat trade was undertaken in 21 municipal markets during four weeks, in Brazzaville. The objective of this study was to define the traders’ profile and to evaluate the quantities of games and meat merchandised on the municipal markets. The study methodology combined two approaches: a quantitative one using a questionnaire as principal tool for collecting data, and a qualitative one associating informal survey methods via individual or group interviews. The results showed that women were the most involved in this trade (52%). Markets trader’s monthly income was estimated at 210,428 (US$420) ± 49,128 (US$98,256) FCFA. On average, the bushmeat traders’ were 39 ± 10 years old and 69% of them attended the two levels of secondary education. During four weeks, 3,711 animal carcasses were recorded on the 21 surveyed markets, representing almost 35,790 kg of biomass. Overall, 35 animal species were identified, including 9 the hunting of which was prohibited. The mammals constituted 93.8% of total number of hunted animals, with three dominant orders as the artiodactyls (49.2%), the rodents (22.6%) and the primates (17.7%), of which the Cephalophus, the Potamochoerus, the Atherurus and the Cercopithecus were the most represented. It was also noticed that trapping, an activity which leads to great losses, becomes very important, followed by be helpful alternatives to meet Congolese demand for bushmeat. For a sustainable management of the Congo’s faunic resources, this study suggests the introduction gun-hunting. The Congo-Ocean Railway and the National Road n°2 were used regularly in the transportation of game, to a 72% level. The district of Niari, Lekoumou, Sangha and Pool were the main sources of supply. At the present time, the meat quantities offered in Brazzaville markets don’t seem to be reduced because hunting areas extend always further, often to the detriment of protected areas. Despite the fact that such business squarely growths and shows evidence of overexploitation, activities promoting game farming and breeding of domestic species, in Brazzaville suburbs, are needed to mitigate the impact of bushmeat trade. [less ▲]

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See detailStructure démographique et mouvements saisonniers des populations d’hippopotame commun, Hippopotamus amphibius Linné 1758 dans la Réserve de Biosphère de la Mare aux Hippopotames en zone sud soudanienne du Burkina Faso
Dibloni, Ollo Théophile; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Guenda, Wendengoudi et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2010), 3(2), 175-189

The study was conducted in the “Mare aux Hippopotames” Biosphere Reserve of Burkina Faso and aimed at assessing the number, age structures and seasonal mobility of Hippopotamus amphibius. Methodology used ... [more ▼]

The study was conducted in the “Mare aux Hippopotames” Biosphere Reserve of Burkina Faso and aimed at assessing the number, age structures and seasonal mobility of Hippopotamus amphibius. Methodology used was based on three consecutive-year (2006-2008) monitoring and ground inventory inside and outside the reserve. The results of the inventories have led to the identification of 41 hippopotamus in 2008 versus 35 in 2006 which are divided into 3 distinct herds. The structure in age group of that population was composed of 32 were adults, 5 sub-adults and 4 juveniles. Location of places where they take a rest varies with the level of the water in the pond. The inventory has identified eight sites on each side of the pond as used by hippos to harvest food. In addition, exploration of the reserve has identified four temporary ponds located near the water meadows used by hippos during the rainy season. These areas were surrounded by agricultural fields that were often raided by these mammals for food. It is urgent to zone agricultural activity in the area and to grant a special conservation status to the four additional ponds to minimize conflicts between humans and hippopotamus. Finally, local participation in conservation activities is probably greatly responsible for an increase in the size of the hippo population. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence de la densité de la population sur la structure spatiale d’un paysage forestier dans le Bassin du Congo en R. D. Congo.
Bamba, I; Barima, Y S S; Bogaert, Jan ULg

in Tropical Conservation Science (2010), 3(1), 43-56

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See detailMise en relation de la diversité des vers de terre et des caractéristiques du sol de Thua Thien Hue (Centre Vietnam)
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Collin, Caroline; Dufey, Joseph et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2009), 2(3), 282-298

The large proportion of sandy soils of Thua Thien Hue, in Central Vietnam, present a particular habitat for soil-inhabiting organisms among which earthworms represent close to 70% of total biomass. This ... [more ▼]

The large proportion of sandy soils of Thua Thien Hue, in Central Vietnam, present a particular habitat for soil-inhabiting organisms among which earthworms represent close to 70% of total biomass. This study identified relationships between the characteristics of soil and earthworms. Our inventories yielded the presence of seven species of earthworms belonging to the families Glossoscolecidae, Megascolecidae and Microchaetidae. These were: Pontoscolex corethrurus, Glyphidrilus papillatus, Pheretima rodericensis, Pheretima danangana, Pheretima sp., Perionyx excavatus, and Lampito mauritii. Those of the Microchaetidae were present in acid soils with a high rate of silt and clay. Species in the other families were associated with poor but less acid sandy soils. This study also showed that the number of P. corethrurus was significantly higher in orchards while L. mauritii was significantly more common in soils with cultures other than rice. The species G. papillatus was significantly more abundant in fallow and was the only species found in this habitat. Highest earthworm diversity (Shannon-Wiener index(H=0.97)) was found in crops like manioc and sweat potatoes rather than in rice. [less ▲]

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