References of "Transboundary and Emerging Diseases"
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See detailMicrobiological zoonotic emerging risks, transmitted between livestock animals and humans (2007-2015)
Filippitzi, ME; Goumperis, T; Robinson, T et al

in Transboundary and emerging diseases (in press)

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See detailResurgence of Schmallenberg virus in Belgium after 3 years of epidemiological silence
Delooz, L; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Quinet, C et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (in press)

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See detailSusceptibility of pigs to zoonotic hepatitis E virus genotype 3 isolated from a wild boar
Thiry, Damien ULg; Rose, Nicolas; Mauroy, Axel ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2016)

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See detailClinical sentinel surveillance of equine West Nile fever, Spain
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Alba-Casals, A; Garcia-Bocanegra, I et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2016), 63(2), 184-193

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See detailCultural Practices Shaping Zoonotic Diseases Surveillance: The Case of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and Thailand Native Chicken Farmers.
Delabouglise, Alexis; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Tatong, D. et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2016)

Effectiveness of current passive zoonotic disease surveillance systems is limited by the under-reporting of disease outbreaks in the domestic animal population. Eval- uating the acceptability of passive ... [more ▼]

Effectiveness of current passive zoonotic disease surveillance systems is limited by the under-reporting of disease outbreaks in the domestic animal population. Eval- uating the acceptability of passive surveillance and its economic, social and cul- tural determinants appears a critical step for improving it. A participatory rural appraisal was implemented in a rural subdistrict of Thailand. Focus group inter- views were used to identify sanitary risks perceived by native chicken farmers and describe the structure of their value chain. Qualitative individual interviews with a large diversity of actors enabled to identify perceived costs and benefits associ- ated with the reporting of HPAI suspicions to sanitary authorities. Besides, flows of information on HPAI suspected cases were assessed using network analysis, based on data collected through individual questionnaires. Results show that the presence of cockfighting activities in the area negatively affected the willingness of all chicken farmers and other actors to report suspected HPAI cases. The high financial and affective value of fighting cocks contradicted the HPAI control pol- icy based on mass culling. However, the importance of product quality in the native chicken meat value chain and the free veterinary services and products delivered by veterinary officers had a positive impact on suspected case reporting. Besides, cockfighting practitioners had a significantly higher centrality than other actors in the information network and they facilitated the spatial diffusion of information. Social ties built in cockfighting activities and the shared purpose of protecting valuable cocks were at the basis of the diffusion of information and the informal collective management of diseases. Building bridges with this informal network would greatly improve the effectiveness of passive surveillance. [less ▲]

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See detailFinancial Impacts of Priority Swine Diseases to Pig Farmers in Red River and Mekong River Delta, Vietnam.
Pham, T. T. Hoa; Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Grosbois, V. et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2016)

A study was conducted between May 2013 and August 2014 in three provinces of Vietnam to investigate financial impacts of swine diseases in pig holdings in 2010-2013. The aim of the study was to quantify ... [more ▼]

A study was conducted between May 2013 and August 2014 in three provinces of Vietnam to investigate financial impacts of swine diseases in pig holdings in 2010-2013. The aim of the study was to quantify the costs of swine diseases at producer level in order to understand swine disease priority for monitoring at local level. Financial impacts of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), foot and mouth disease (FMD), and epidemic diarrhoea were assessed for 162 pig holders in two Red River Delta provinces and in one Mekong River Delta province, using data on pig production and swine disease outbreaks at farms. Losses incurred by swine diseases were estimated, including direct losses due to mortality (100% market value of pig before disease onset) and morbidity (abortion, delay of finishing stage), and indirect losses due to control costs (treatment, improving biosecurity and emergency vaccination) and revenue foregone (lower price in case of emergency selling). Financial impacts of swine diseases were expressed as percentage of gross margin of pig holding. The gross margin varied between pig farming groups (P < 0.0001) in the following order: large farm (USD 18 846), fattening farm (USD 7014) and smallholder (USD 2350). The losses per pig holding due to PRRS were the highest: 41% of gross margin for large farm, 38% for fattening farm and 63% for smallholder. Cost incurred by FMD was lower with 19%, 25% and 32% of gross margin of pig holding in large farm, fattening farm and smallholder, respectively. The cost of epidemic diarrhoea was the lowest compared to losses due to PRRS and FMD and accounted for around 10% of gross margin of pig holding in the three pig farming groups. These estimates provided critical elements on swine disease priorities to better inform surveillance and control at both national and local level. [less ▲]

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See detailBelgian Wildlife as Potential Zoonotic Reservoir of Hepatitis E virus
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2015)

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See detailHepatitis E Virus and Related Viruses in Animals
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Pavio, Nicole et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2015)

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See detailHow to Assess Data Availability, Accessibility and Format for Risk Analysis?
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Vandeputte, Sébastien; Mignot, Clémence et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2015), doi: 10.1111/tbed.12328

Risk assessments are mostly carried out based on available data, which do not reflect all data theoretically required by experts to answer them. This study aimed at developing a methodology to assess data ... [more ▼]

Risk assessments are mostly carried out based on available data, which do not reflect all data theoretically required by experts to answer them. This study aimed at developing a methodology to assess data availability, accessibility and format, based on a scoring system and focusing on two diseases: Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE), still exotic to Europe, and alveolar echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus multilocularis (EM), endemic in several Member States (MSs). After reviewing 36 opinions of the EFSA-AHAW Panel on risk assessment of animal health questions, a generic list of needed data was elaborated. The methodology consisted, first, in implementing a direct and an indirect survey to collect the data needed for both case studies: the direct survey consisted in a questionnaire sent to contact points of three European MSs (Belgium, France and the Netherlands), and the organization of a workshop gathering experts on both diseases. The indirect survey, focusing on the three MSs involved in the direct survey plus Spain, relied on web searches. Secondly, a scoring system with reference to data availability, accessibility and format was elaborated, to, finally, compare both diseases and data between MSs. The accessibility of data was generally related to their availability. Web searches resulted in more data available for VEE compared to EM, despite its current exotic status in the European Union. Hypertext markup language and portable document files were the main formats of available data. Data availability, accessibility and format should be improved for research scientists/assessors. The format of data plays a key role in the feasibility and rapidness of data management and analysis, through a prompt compilation, combination and aggregation in working databases. Harmonization of data collection process is encouraged, according to standardized procedures, to provide useful and reliable data, both at the national and the international levels for both animal and human health; it would allow assessing data gaps through comparative studies. The present methodology is a good way of assessing the relevance of data for risk assessment, as it allows integrating the uncertainty linked to the quality of data used. Such an approach could be described as transparent and traceable and should be performed systematically. [less ▲]

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See detailCongenital jaundice in bovine aborted foetuses: An emerging syndrome in Southern Belgium
Delooz; Mori, M; Petitjean, T et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2015), 62(2), 124-126

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See detailThree Different Routes of Inoculation for Experimental Infection with Schmallenberg Virus in Sheep
Martinelle; Poskin, A; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2015)

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See detailRisk of Introduction in Northern Vietnam of HPAI Viruses from China: Description, Patterns and Drivers of Illegal Poultry Trade
Desvaux, Stéphanie; Nguyen Cong, Oanh ULg; Vu Dinh, Ton et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2014)

Poultry movement is known to contribute to the dissemination of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. In Northern Vietnam, the illegal trade of poultry from China is a source of concern and is ... [more ▼]

Poultry movement is known to contribute to the dissemination of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. In Northern Vietnam, the illegal trade of poultry from China is a source of concern and is considered as responsible for the regular introduction of new H5N1 viruses. The general objective of this study was to get a better understanding of this illegal trade (organization, volume, actors involved and drivers) to propose adequate preventive and control options. The information was also used to qualitatively evaluate the risk of exposure of susceptible poultry to HPAI H5N1 virus introduced from China by illegally traded poultry. We found that the main products imported from China are spent hens, day-old chicks (DOCs) and ducklings; spent hens being introduced in very large number. The drivers of this trade are multiple: economic (especially for spent hens) but also technical (demand for improved genetic potential for DOC and ducklings). Furthermore, these introductions also meet a high consumer demand at certain periods of the year. We also found that spatial dispersion of a batch of poultry illegally introduced from China is extensive and rapid, making any prediction of possible new outbreaks very hazardous. Finally, a risk mitigation plan should include measures to tackle the drivers of this trade or to legally organize it, to limit the threat to the local poultry sector. It is also essential for traders to be progressively better organized and biosecure and for hygienic practices to be enforced, as our study confirmed that at-risk behaviours are still very common among this profession. [less ▲]

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See detailBovine Brucellosis in Argentina and Bordering Countries: Update
Aznar, M; Samartino, L; Humblet, Marie-France ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2014), 61(2), 121-133

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See detailField veterinary survey on clinical and economic impact of Schmallenberg virus in Belgium
Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Gauthier, B et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2014), 61(3), 285-288

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See detailPreliminary survey on the impact of Schmallenberg virus on sheep flocks in south of Belgium
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2014), 61(5), 469-472

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See detailClinical pattern characterisation of cattle naturally infected by BTV-8 - Clinical characterisation of BTV-8 infected cattle
Zanella, G; Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Guyot, Hugues ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2013), 60(3), 231-237

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See detailBluetongue Virus RNA Detection by Real-Time RT-PCR in Post-Vaccination Samples from Cattle.
De Leeuw, I.; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Bertels, G. et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2013)

Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) was responsible for a large outbreak among European ruminant populations in 2006-2009. In spring 2008, a massive vaccination campaign was undertaken, leading to the ... [more ▼]

Bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) was responsible for a large outbreak among European ruminant populations in 2006-2009. In spring 2008, a massive vaccination campaign was undertaken, leading to the progressive disappearance of the virus. During surveillance programmes in Western Europe in 2010-2011, a low but significant number of animals were found weakly positive using BTV-specific real-time RT-PCR, raising questions about a possible low level of virus circulation. An interference of the BTV-8 inactivated vaccine on the result of the real-time RT-PCR was also hypothesized. Several studies specifically addressed the potential association between a recent vaccination and BTV-8 RNA detection in the blood of sheep. Results were contradictory and cattles were not investigated. To enlighten this point, a large study was performed to determine the risks of detection of bluetongue vaccine-associated RNA in the blood and spleen of cattle using real-time RT-PCR. Overall, the results presented clearly demonstrate that vaccine viral RNA can reach the blood circulation in sufficient amounts to be detected by real-time RT-PCR in cattle. This BTV-8 vaccine RNA carriage appears as short lasting. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical Indicators of Exposure to Coxiella burnetii in Dairy Herds
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Speybroeck, N; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2013)

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