References of "Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology"
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See detailDevelopmental defects in zebrafish for classification of EGF pathway inhibitors.
Pruvot, Benoist ULg; Curé, Yoann ULg; Djiotsa, Joachim et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (2014), 274

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See detailA non-invasive approach to study lifetime exposure and bioaccumulation of PCBs in protected marine mammals: PBPK modeling in harbor porpoises
Weijs, Liesbeth; Covaci, Adrian; Yang, Raymond S. H. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (2011), 256

In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically ... [more ▼]

In the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have increasingly been developed to explain the kinetics of environmental pollutants in wildlife. For marine mammals specifically, these models provide a new, non-destructive tool that enables the integration of biomonitoring activities and in vitro studies. The goals of the present study were firstly to develop PBPK models for several environmental relevant PCB congeners in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a species that is sensitive to pollution because of its limited metabolic capacity for pollutant transformation. These models were tested using tissue data of porpoises from the Black Sea. Secondly, the predictive power of the models was investigated for time trends in the PCB concentrations in North Sea harbor porpoises between 1990 and 2008. Thirdly, attempts were made to assess metabolic capacities of harbor porpoises for the investigated PCBs. In general, results show that parameter values from other species (rodents, humans) are not always suitable in marine mammal models, most probably due to differences in physiology and exposure. The PCB 149 levels decrease the fastest in male harbor porpoises from the North Sea in a time period of 18†years, whereas the PCB 101 levels decrease the slowest. According to the models, metabolic breakdown of PCB 118 is probably of lesser importance compared to other elimination pathways. For PCB 101 and 149 however, the presence of their metabolites can be attributed to bioaccumulation of metabolites from the prey and to metabolic breakdown of the parent compounds in the harbor porpoises. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of polystyrene particles on lung mirovascular permeability in isolated perfused rabbit lungs : role of size and surface proporties
Hamoir, J.; Nemmar, A.; Halloy, D. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (2003), 190

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See detailInflammatory Effect of Intratracheal Instillation of Ultrafine Particles in the Rabbit: Role of C-Fiber and Mast Cells
Nemmar, A.; Delaunois, Annie ULg; Nemery, B. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1999), 160(3), 250-61

The effects of ultrafine polystyrene carboxylate-modified (fluorospheres) on inflammatory processes are being investigated in rabbit lungs. One milliliter of sterile NaCl (0.9%) containing 4 mg of ... [more ▼]

The effects of ultrafine polystyrene carboxylate-modified (fluorospheres) on inflammatory processes are being investigated in rabbit lungs. One milliliter of sterile NaCl (0.9%) containing 4 mg of ultrafine particles (UFP) was intratracheally instilled into anesthetized rabbits. The control animals were only instilled with sterile NaCl (0.9%). Twenty hours after being instilled, the rabbits were killed and their lungs were excised and then tracheally perfused with phosphate-buffered physiological solution (PBS). The lung effluents, collected from small holes made in the pleura, were analyzed for substance P (SP) and histamine content by radioimmunoassay (RIA) methods, after administration of drugs. In addition, in other groups of rabbits, the lung wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio was monitored, as were the cellular and protein contents in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Electron microscopy examination was also performed. In tracheally superfused experiments, UFP induced a significant enhancement of both SP and histamine releases after administration of capsaicin (10(-4) M), to stimulate C-fiber, and carbachol (10(-4) M), a cholinergic agonist. A significant increase in histamine release was also recorded in the UFP-instilled group following the administration of both SP (10(-6) M) plus thiorphan (10(-5) M) and compound 48/80 (C48/80) (10(-3) M) to stimulate mast cells. In addition, the BAL fluid analysis of UFP groups showed an influx of neutrophils and an increase in total protein concentration. An increase in the lung WW/DW ratio was also recorded. Both epithelial and endothelial injuries were observed in the lungs of UFP-instilled rabbits. The pretreatment of rabbits in vivo with a mixture of either SR 140333 and SR 48368, a tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptor antagonist, or a mixture of terfenadine and cimetidine, a histamine H(1) and H(2) receptor antagonist, prevented UFP- induced neutrophil influx and increased total proteins and lung WW/DW ratio. Therefore, it can be concluded that chemicaly inert, electrically charged UFP induce a pulmonary inflammatory process during which the release of SP and histamine from C-fibers and mast cells was enhanced after various stimuli. These latter mediators can also modulate the inflammatory process. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractions Of Macrolide Antibiotics (Erythromycin A, Roxithromycin, Erythromycylamine [Dirithromycin], And Azithromycin) With Phospholipids: Computer-Aided Conformational Analysis And Studies On Acellular And Cell Culture Models
Montenez, Jp.; Van Bambeke, F.; Piret, J. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1999), 156(2), 129-40

The potential of 14/15 membered macrolides to cause phospholipidosis has been prospectively assessed, and structure-effects examined, using combined experimental and conformational approaches. Biochemical ... [more ▼]

The potential of 14/15 membered macrolides to cause phospholipidosis has been prospectively assessed, and structure-effects examined, using combined experimental and conformational approaches. Biochemical studies demonstrated drug binding to phosphatidylinositol-containing liposomes and inhibition of the activity of lysosomal phospholipase A1 toward phosphatidylcholine included in the bilayer, in close correlation with the number of cationic groups carried by the drugs (erythromycin A </= roxithromycin < erythromycylamine </= azithromycin). In cultured cells (fibroblasts), phospholipidosis (affecting all major phospholipids except sphingomyelin) was observed after 3 days with the following ranking: erythromycin A </= roxithromycin < erythromycylamine < azithromycin (roxithromycin could, however, not be studied in detail due to intrinsic toxicity). The difference between erythromycylamine and azithromycin was accounted for by the lower cellular accumulation of erythromycylamine. In parallel, based on a methodology developed and validated to study drug-membrane interactions, the conformational analyses revealed that erythromycin A, roxithromycin, erythromycylamine, and azithromycin penetrate into the hydrophobic domain of a phosphatidylinositol monolayer through their desosamine and cladinose moieties, whereas their macrocycle is found close to the interface. This position allows the aminogroups carried by the macrocycle of the diaminated macrolides (erythromycylamine and azithromycin) to come into close contact with the negatively charged phosphogroup of phosphatidylinositol, whereas the amine located on the C-3 of the desosamine, common to all four drugs, is located at a greater distance from this phosphogroup. Our study suggests that all macrolides have the potential to cause phospholipidosis but that this effect is modulated by toxicodynamic and toxicokinetic parameters related to the drug structure and mainly to their cationic character. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of ozone-induced effects on lung mechanics and hemodynamics in the rabbit.
Delaunois, Annie ULg; Segura, P.; Montano, L. M. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1998), 150(1), 58-67

The effects of rabbit exposure to ozone (O3)(0.4 ppm for 4 h) on pulmonary mechanical properties and hemodynamics have been investigated on the isolated perfused lung model. Tracheal pressure, airflow ... [more ▼]

The effects of rabbit exposure to ozone (O3)(0.4 ppm for 4 h) on pulmonary mechanical properties and hemodynamics have been investigated on the isolated perfused lung model. Tracheal pressure, airflow, and tidal volume were measured in order to calculate lung resistance (RL) and dynamic compliance (Cdyn). Using the arterial/venous/double occlusion method, the total pressure gradient (deltaPT) was partitioned into four components (arterial, pre-, postcapillary and venous). Dose-response curves to acetylcholine (ACh), substance P (SP), and histamine were constructed in lungs isolated from rabbits immediately or 48 h after air or O3 exposure O3 induced a significant increase in the baseline value of deltaPt, more markedly 48 h after the exposure. Immediately after the exposure, O3 partly inhibited the ACh-, SP-, and histamine-induced decreases in Cdyn and increases in RL. This inhibitory effect was still in part present 48 h after O3 treatment. In the groups studied immediately after exposure, O3 did not significantly modify the ACh-, SP-, and histamine-induced vasoconstriction. Forty-eight hours after exposure, O3 induced a contractile response to ACh and SP in the arterial segment but decreased the response to histamine. We conclude that O3 can induce direct vascular constriction. Directly, but also 48 h after exposure, O3 can inhibit the ACh-, SP-, and histamine-induced changes in lung mechanical properties. Ozone can also induce some changes in the intensity and in the location of the vascular responses to ACh, SP, and histamine. [less ▲]

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See detailOzone-Induced Stimulation of Pulmonary Sympathetic Fibers: A Protective Mechanism against Edema
Delaunois, Annie ULg; Segura, P.; Dessy, Cécile ULg et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1997), 147(1), 71-82

Tropospheric ozone exerts well-described toxic effects on the respiratory tract. Less documented, by contrast, is the ability of ozone to induce protective mechanisms against agents that are toxic to the ... [more ▼]

Tropospheric ozone exerts well-described toxic effects on the respiratory tract. Less documented, by contrast, is the ability of ozone to induce protective mechanisms against agents that are toxic to the lungs. In particular, interactions between ozone and the sympathetic nervous system have never been considered. Using a model of permeability edema in isolated perfused rabbit lungs, we report here that, immediately after exposure of rabbits to 0.4 ppm ozone for 4 hr, the pulmonary microvascular responses to acetylcholine and substance P are completely blocked. Several lines of evidence, including partial inhibition of the ozone-induced protective effect by several drugs (alpha2- and beta-adrenergic antagonists, neuropeptide Y antagonist, guanethidine), measured levels of released catecholamines in blood and urine and the in vitro response of isolated lungs exposed to 0.4 ppm ozone all seem to suggest that ozone can stimulate pulmonary adrenergic fibers and induce the local release of catecholamines and neuropeptide Y, this resulting in transient protection against pulmonary edema. We also showed that, 48 hr after the exposure, ozone increased the baseline microvascular permeability and the response to low concentrations of acetylcholine [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between Parathion and Paraoxon Toxicokinetics, Lung Metabolic Activity, and Cholinesterase Inhibition in Guinea Pig and Rabbit Lungs
Lessire, Françoise ULg; Gustin, Pascal ULg; Delaunois, Annie et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1996), 138(2), 201-210

Kinetic parameters of parathion and paraoxon uptake were determined in isolated and perfused rabbit and guinea pig lungs. They were related to organophosphate-induced lung cholinesterase inhibition. A ... [more ▼]

Kinetic parameters of parathion and paraoxon uptake were determined in isolated and perfused rabbit and guinea pig lungs. They were related to organophosphate-induced lung cholinesterase inhibition. A single pass procedure was used to perfuse the lungs with an artificial medium perfusate containing paraoxon or parathion. The paraoxon and parathion concentrations were determined in the effluents collected at chosen intervals over an 18-min period beginning at the start of perfusion. Three inflowing concentrations (1 nmol/ml, 10 nmol/ml, and 20 nmol/ml) were tested in guinea pig lungs and one (10 nmol/ml) in rabbit lungs. Cholinesterase activity was determined at time 0 and at the end of the experiment. The lungs abundantly extracted paraoxon and parathion over the perfusion period. The extraction ratio was consistently greater in guinea pig than in rabbit lungs. The uptake velocity varied biexponentially in time, suggesting the existence of two compartments. Initial uptake velocities (A, B) and slopes (alpha and beta) were calculated for both compartments. In guinea pigs, A, B and A + B increased proportionally to the supply rate of paraoxon and parathion while a and b remained constant. No significant difference was observed between parathion and paraoxon uptake kinetics. Parameter B was the only one to differ significantly between the two species (rabbits: 8.19 +/- 1.53 for parathion and 6.85 +/- 1.26 for paraoxon; guinea pigs: 12.75 +/- 0.88 for parathion and 15.02 +/- 3.84 for paraoxon). In the lungs of both species, there was a linear relation between y, the percentage of cholinesterase inhibition induced by either organophosphate, and X, the total amount of drug taken up by the lung tissue (in nmol/g/18 min). The following equations were obtained: y = 0.128 x + 0.979 (R2 = 0.89, p < 0.001 for paraoxon); y = 0.120 x - 6.57 (R2 = 0.82, p < 0.005 for parathion). No difference was observed between the two organophosphates. After treatment with the cytochrome P450 inhibitor piperonyl butoxide, the above relations ceased to apply, but this treatment did not influence the kinetics of paraoxon and parathion uptake. The IC50 value calculated for paraoxon, i.e., the paraoxon concentration required to produce 50% inhibition of lung cholinesterase activity, was similar for guinea pigs (2.22 10(-7) +/- 0.22 M) and rabbits (2.36 10(-7) +/- 0.24 M). In conclusion, the biexponential evolution of the velocity of paraoxon and parathion uptake by the lungs thus demonstrates the presence of two pools. The lower extraction ratios calculated for rabbit lungs reflect the lower initial uptake velocity of the second compartment. In the range of concentrations investigated in guinea pigs, no saturable mechanism could be demonstrated for paraoxon and parathion. Cytochrome P450-related lung metabolic activity, through which parathion is converted to paraoxon, appears as a major step in parathion-induced lung cholinesterase inhibition, although it does not appear to affect parathion toxicokinetics [less ▲]

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See detailProtective Effect of Various Antagonists of Inflammatory Mediators against Paraoxon-Induced Pulmonary Edema in the Rabbit
Delaunois, Annie ULg; Gustin, Pascal ULg; Vargas, M. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1995), 132(2), 343-345

The protective effect of some antagonists of various inflammatory mediators against paraoxon-induced increases in endothelial permeability has been investigated in isolated perfused rabbit lungs. The ... [more ▼]

The protective effect of some antagonists of various inflammatory mediators against paraoxon-induced increases in endothelial permeability has been investigated in isolated perfused rabbit lungs. The edema induced by paraoxon has been previously related to a chain reaction mediated by acetylcholine. Lungs were ventilated and blood-free perfused with a constant flow. Arterial and venous pressures and lung weight were continuously recorded. Endothelial permeability was evaluated by measuring the capillary filtration coefficient (Kf,c). Paraoxon (4 x 10(-4) M) was injected in the perfusion circuit, in lungs with or without pretreatment with atropine, ketanserin, clonidine, morphine, indomethacin, and terfenadine plus cimetidine. Paraoxon induced a time-dependent increase in the Kf,c, a maximal effect being recorded 60 min after the injection. All the antagonists used as pretreatment significantly reduced the maximal effect recorded after paraoxon. These results show that muscarinic receptor antagonists, inhibitors of neuropeptides release, cyclooxygenase inhibitors, and 5-hydroxytryptamine and histamine receptor antagonists can protect the lung against the edema induced by paraoxon. This protective effect is due to inhibition of the chain reaction triggered by acetylcholine. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Atmospheric Ammonia on Pulmonary Hemodynamics and Vascular Permeability in Pigs: Interaction with Endotoxins
Gustin, Pascal ULg; Urbain, B.; Prouvost, J. F. et al

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1994), 125(1), 17-26

The influence of atmospheric ammonia on the somatic growth, the plasma cortisol and ammonia concentrations, and cell blood counts was investigated in pigs exposed to four concentrations (0, 25, 50, and ... [more ▼]

The influence of atmospheric ammonia on the somatic growth, the plasma cortisol and ammonia concentrations, and cell blood counts was investigated in pigs exposed to four concentrations (0, 25, 50, and 100 ppm) for 6 days in a specifically designed air-pollutants exposure chamber. The effects of this gas on pulmonary vascular hemodynamics and permeability and on the endotoxin-induced vascular response were also assessed using an isolated perfused lung preparation. The total pulmonary blood flow resistance (Rt) was partitioned into four components: arterial (Ra), pre-(Ra′) and post-(Rv′) capillary and venous (Rv). The capillary filtration coefficient (Kf,c) was evaluated by using a gravimetric technique. None of the concentrations of ammonia significantly modified the plasma cortisol and ammonia concentrations or the differential leukocyte percentages and total white blood cell count, suggesting an absence of stress related to ammonia. In exposed animals, lethargy and a concentration-related depression of the somatic growth were observed. The equation of the regression line plotted relating the mean values of the changes in body weight gain recorded over the exposure period expressed as percentages of the initial body weight (y) and ammonia concentrations (x) was: y = 3.204 − 0.177x + 0.001x2(r = 0.99; p≤0.013). Endotoxin infused in the perfusion liquid of lungs from unexposed animals for 180 min induced a significant 208% increase in Rt (p < 0.001) which can be ascribed to a 338 and 180% increase in Ra′ and Rv′, respectively. Endotoxin infusion also induced a 62% (p ≤ 0.001) increase in the Kf,c. Exposure of pigs to ammonia at any concentration did not modify the baseline values of any hemodynamic or permeability parameters. However, the hemodynamic response to endotoxins in lungs from pigs exposed to 100 ppm was significantly altered. The increase in Rt, Ra′, and Rv′ observed in unexposed pigs was completely abolished as shown by the limited changes in Rt (+34.9%). An intermediate reaction (+131.7%) was obtained in pigs exposed to 50 ppm. This inhibiting effect of ammonia was closely correlated with gas concentration by a linear regression (r = 0.99; p ≤ 0.037). The changes in the Kf,c recorded in the control group were not modified by exposure to ammonia. It was concluded that exposure of pigs to aerial ammonia concentrations from 0 to 100 ppm for 6 days has no direct effect on the pulmonary microvascular hemodynamics and permeability and induces no stress response. A marked depressive effect on the somatic growth is observed at concentrations greater than 25 ppm. Concentrations greater than 50 ppm can modulate the pulmonary vascular response to endotoxins [less ▲]

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See detailAltered Capillary Filtration Coefficient in Parathion- and Paraoxon-Induced Edema in Isolated and Perfused Rabbit Lungs
Delaunois, Annie; Gustin, Pascal ULg; Ansay, Michel

in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology (1992), 116(2), 161-169

Changes in pulmonary endothelium permeability and in microvascular hemodynamics induced by parathion (Pth) and paraoxon (Pox), its active metabolite, were investigated in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs ... [more ▼]

Changes in pulmonary endothelium permeability and in microvascular hemodynamics induced by parathion (Pth) and paraoxon (Pox), its active metabolite, were investigated in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs. Blood-free perfusate was recirculated through isolated and ventilated lungs in an isogravimetric state and in zone III conditions. The arterial/venous/double occlusion technique was used to divide the total vascular resistance (Rt) into four components: arterial, precapillary, postcapillary, and venous. The capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) was evaluated by measuring the amount of fluid filtering through the endothelium when the arterial and venous pressures were suddenly increased. Pth and Pox induced pulmonary edema by increasing endothelium permeability without changing the hemodynamic parameters at any level of the vascular bed. The Kfc value increased progressively, reaching a maximum (Emax) 60 min after administration of organophosphate (558 ± 65% (n = 5) and 707 ± 109% (n = 5) of baseline values, for Pth and Pox, respectively). During the next 60 min, it decreased. The time course of Pox-induced changes in Kfc was similar to that obtained with Pth. The concentration-response curve (Emax) expressed as a percentage of the baseline value versus the logarithm of the malor Pth concentration, ranging from 2 × 10−5 to 4 × 10−4 image) was linear (y = 1661.1 + 327.3x, R = 0.89, p < 0.001, N = 14). Piperonyl butoxide (4 × 10−4 image), an inhibitor of cytochrome P450, had a strong protective effect against Pth (4 × 10−4 image)-induced alterations of endothelium permeability (n = 5, p < 0.001). The effects of Pox (4 × 10−4 image) on Kfc were completely abolished by pretreatment with 10−5 image atropine, as shown by the significantly lower Emax value recorded in atropine-pretreated lungs (129 ± 33%, n = 4) than in Pox-treated lungs (707 ± 109%, n = 5, p < 0.001). The effects of Pth, on the other hand, were only partially inhibited, since the Emax value recorded in atropine-pretreated lungs (196 ± 20%, n = 4) remained significantly higher than that recorded for control lungs (129 ± 15%; n = 5; p < 0.05). These results show that isolated and perfused rabbit lungs constitute and appropriate model for studying the direct pulmonary effects of organophosphates. The edema-inducing action of Pth depends on its activation by conversion to Pox in the lung tissue. It can be explained by an increase in endothelium permeability. This effect is mediated principally by muscarinic receptors [less ▲]

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