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See detailA Brief Review of Ultraviolet Auroral Emissions on Giant Planets
Grodent, Denis ULg

in Space Science Reviews (2014)

The morphologies of the ultraviolet auroral emissions on the giant gas planets, Jupiter and Saturn, have conveniently been described with combinations of a restricted number of basic components. Although ... [more ▼]

The morphologies of the ultraviolet auroral emissions on the giant gas planets, Jupiter and Saturn, have conveniently been described with combinations of a restricted number of basic components. Although this simplified view is very handy for a gross depiction of the giant planets’ aurorae, it fails to scrutinize the diversity and the dynamics of the actual features that are regularly observed with the available ultraviolet imagers and spectrographs. In the present review, the typical morphologies of Jupiter and Saturn’s aurorae are represented with an updated and more accurate set of components. The use of sketches, rather than images, makes it possible to compile all these components in a single view and to put aside ultraviolet imaging technical issues that are blurring the emission sources, thus preventing one from disentangling the different auroral signatures. The ionospheric and magnetospheric processes to which these auroral features allude can then be more easily accounted. In addition, the use of components of the same kind for both planets may help to put forward similarities and differences between Jupiter and Saturn. The case of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune is much less compelling since their weak auroral emissions are very poorly documented and one can only speculate about their origin. This review presents a current perspective that will inevitably evolve in the future, especially with upcoming observing campaigns and forthcoming missions like Juno. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Ultraviolet Spectrograph on NASA’s Juno Mission
Gladstone, G Randal; Persyn, Steven C.; Eterno, John S. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2014)

The ultraviolet spectrograph instrument on the Juno mission (Juno-UVS) is a long-slit imaging spectrograph designed to observe and characterize Jupiter’s far-ultraviolet (FUV) auroral emissions. These ... [more ▼]

The ultraviolet spectrograph instrument on the Juno mission (Juno-UVS) is a long-slit imaging spectrograph designed to observe and characterize Jupiter’s far-ultraviolet (FUV) auroral emissions. These observations will be coordinated and correlated with those from Juno’s other remote sensing instruments and used to place in situ measurements made by Juno’s particles and fields instruments into a global context, relating the local data with events occurring in more distant regions of Jupiter’s magnetosphere. Juno-UVS is based on a series of imaging FUV spectrographs currently in flight—the two Alice instruments on the Rosetta and New Horizons missions, and the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. However, Juno-UVS has several important modifications, including (1) a scan mirror (for targeting specific auroral features), (2) extensive shielding (for mitigation of electronics and data quality degradation by energetic particles), and (3) a cross delay line microchannel plate detector (for both faster photon counting and improved spatial resolution). This paper describes the science objectives, design, and initial performance of the Juno-UVS. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnetospheric Science Objectives of the Juno Mission
Bagenal, Fran; Adriani, A.; Allegrini, F. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2014)

In July 2016, NASA’s Juno mission becomes the first spacecraft to enter polar orbit of Jupiter and enture deep into unexplored polar territories of the magnetosphere. Focusing on these polar regions, we ... [more ▼]

In July 2016, NASA’s Juno mission becomes the first spacecraft to enter polar orbit of Jupiter and enture deep into unexplored polar territories of the magnetosphere. Focusing on these polar regions, we review current understanding of the structure and dynamics of the magnetosphere and summarize the outstanding issues. The Juno mission profile involves (a) a several-week approach from the dawn side of Jupiter’s magnetosphere, with an orbit-insertion maneuver on July 6, 2016; (b) a 107-day capture orbit, also on the dawn flank; and (c) a series of thirty 11-day science orbits with the spacecraft flying over Jupiter’s poles and ducking under the radiation belts. We show how Juno’s view of the magnetosphere evolves over the year of science orbits. The Juno spacecraft carries a range of instruments that take particles and fields measurements, remote sensing observations of auroral emissions at UV, visible, IR and radio wavelengths, and detect microwave emission from Jupiter’s radiation belts. We summarize how these Juno measurements address issues of auroral processes, microphysical plasma physics, ionosphere-magnetosphere and satellite-magnetosphere coupling, sources and sinks of plasma, the radiation belts, and the dynamics of the outer magnetosphere. To reach Jupiter, the Juno spacecraft passed close to the Earth on October 9, 2013, gaining the necessary energy to get to Jupiter. The Earth flyby provided an opportunity to test Juno’s instrumentation as well as take scientific data in the terrestrial magnetosphere, in conjunction with ground-based and Earth-orbiting assets. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma Motion and Kinematics in Cool and Hot Stars
Güdel, Manuel; Nazé, Yaël ULg

in Space Science Reviews (2010), 157

The environments of both hot and cool stars are the sites of highly dynamic processes involving motion of gas and plasma in winds, flows across shocks, plasma motions in closed magnetic fields, or streams ... [more ▼]

The environments of both hot and cool stars are the sites of highly dynamic processes involving motion of gas and plasma in winds, flows across shocks, plasma motions in closed magnetic fields, or streams along magnetospheric accretion funnels. X-ray spectroscopy has opened new windows toward the study of these processes. Kinematics are evident in line shifts and line broadening, and also more indirectly through the analysis and interpretation of density-sensitive lines. In hot stellar winds, expanding-wind kinematics are directly seen in broadened lines although the broadening has turned out to often be smaller than anticipated, and some lines are so narrow that coronal models have been revived. Although X-ray spectra of cool stars have shown line shifts and broadening due to the kinematics of the entire corona, e.g., in binary systems, intrinsic mass motions are challenging to observe at the presently available resolution. Much indirect evidence for mass motion in magnetic coronae is nevertheless available. And finally, spectral diagnostics has also led to a new picture of X-ray production in accreting pre-main sequence stars where massive accretion flows collide with the photospheric gas, producing shocks in which gas is heated to high temperatures. We summarize evidence for the above mechanisms based on spectroscopic data from XMM-Newton and Chandra. [less ▲]

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See detailSun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI)
Howard, R. A.; Moses, J. D.; Vourlidas, A. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2008), 136

The Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) is a five telescope package, which has been developed for the Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory (STEREO) mission by the Naval ... [more ▼]

The Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) is a five telescope package, which has been developed for the Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory (STEREO) mission by the Naval Research Laboratory (USA), the Lockheed Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory (USA), the Goddard Space Flight Center (USA), the University of Birmingham (UK), the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK), the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (Germany), the Centre Spatiale de Leige (Belgium), the Institut d'Optique (France) and the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (France). SECCHI comprises five telescopes, which together image the solar corona from the solar disk to beyond 1 AU. These telescopes are: an extreme ultraviolet imager (EUVI: 1 1.7 R[SUB]o[/SUB]), two traditional Lyot coronagraphs (COR1: 1.5 4 R[SUB]o[/SUB] and COR2: 2.5 15 R[SUB]o[/SUB]) and two new designs of heliospheric imagers (HI-1: 15 84 R[SUB]o[/SUB] and HI-2: 66 318 R[SUB]o[/SUB]). All the instruments use 2048×2048 pixel CCD arrays in a backside-in mode. The EUVI backside surface has been specially processed for EUV sensitivity, while the others have an anti-reflection coating applied. A multi-tasking operating system, running on a PowerPC CPU, receives commands from the spacecraft, controls the instrument operations, acquires the images and compresses them for downlink through the main science channel (at compression factors typically up to 20×) and also through a low bandwidth channel to be used for space weather forecasting (at compression factors up to 200×). An image compression factor of about 10× enable the collection of images at the rate of about one every 2 3 minutes. Identical instruments, except for different sizes of occulters, are included on the STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft. [less ▲]

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See detail"Strategies of life detection": Summary and outlook
Botta, Oliver; Bada, Jeffrey L; Gomez-Elvira, Javier et al

in Space Science Reviews (2008), 135(1-4), 371-380

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See detailStrategies of life detection - Foreword
Bada, J. L.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg et al

in Space Science Reviews (2008), 135(1-4), 1-3

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See detailCompressive and rarefactive electron-acoustic solitons and double layers in space plasmas
Verheest, F.; Cattaert, Tom ULg; Hellberg, M. A.

in Space Science Reviews (2005), 121(1-4), 299-311

Space observations in several near-Earth environments have revealed the presence of positive-potential, large-amplitude electrostatic structures, associated with high-frequency disturbances, and ... [more ▼]

Space observations in several near-Earth environments have revealed the presence of positive-potential, large-amplitude electrostatic structures, associated with high-frequency disturbances, and indicative of electron dynamics. Earlier models proposed in terms of electron-acoustic solitary waves in a two-electron-temperature plasma were inadequate, because only negative potential structures could thus be obtained, whereas the observations point to positive potential structures. In this paper, it is shown that the theoretical restriction to negative potential solitons is due to the neglect of the inertia of the hot electrons, implicitly or explicitly assumed in previous papers. If hot electron inertia is retained, however, there exists a parameter range where positive potential solitary waves are formed, which can have important consequences for the re-interpretation of several astrophysical phenomena involving two-electron-temperature plasmas. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of superthermal particles on waves in magnetized space plasmas
Hellberg, M.; Mace, R.; Cattaert, Tom ULg

in Space Science Reviews (2005), 121(1-4), 127-139

Distributions with excess numbers of superthermal particles are common in space environments. They are well modelled by the isotropic kappa distribution, or, where magnetic effects are important, the ... [more ▼]

Distributions with excess numbers of superthermal particles are common in space environments. They are well modelled by the isotropic kappa distribution, or, where magnetic effects are important, the kappa-Maxwellian. This paper presents a review of some studies of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in such plasmas, based on the associated generalized plasma dispersion functions, Z(kappa) and Z(kappa M). In particular, the effects of low values of kappa are considered, i.e. strongly accelerated distribution functions. Recently the full susceptibility tensor for oblique propagation of electromagnetic waves in a kappa-Maxwellian magnetoplasma has been established and has been applied to the study of whistler waves. [less ▲]

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See detailGlobal Imaging of Proton and Electron Aurorae in the far Ultraviolet
Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Immel, T. J. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2003), 109

The IMAGE spacecraft carries three FUV photon imagers, the Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) and two channels, SI-12 and SI-13, of the Spectrographic Imager. These provide simultaneous global images, which ... [more ▼]

The IMAGE spacecraft carries three FUV photon imagers, the Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) and two channels, SI-12 and SI-13, of the Spectrographic Imager. These provide simultaneous global images, which can be interpreted in terms of the precipitating particle types (protons and electrons) and their energies. IMAGE FUV is the first space-borne global imager that can provide instantaneous global images of the proton precipitation. At times a bright auroral spot, rich in proton precipitation, is observed on the dayside, several degrees poleward of the auroral zone. The spot was identified as the footprint of the merging region of the cusp that is located on lobe field lines when IMF B[SUB]z[/SUB] was northward. This identification was based on compelling statistical evidence showing that the appearance and location of the spot is consistent with the IMF B[SUB]z[/SUB] and B[SUB]y[/SUB] directions. The intensity of the spot is well correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure and it was found that the direct entry of solar wind particles could account for the intensity of the observed spot without the need for any additional acceleration. Another discovery was the observation of dayside sub-auroral proton arcs. These arcs were observed in the midday to afternoon MLT sector. Conjugate satellite observations showed that these arcs were generated by pure proton precipitation. Nightside auroras and their relationship to substorm phases were studied through single case studies and in a superimposed epoch analysis. It was found that generally there is substantial proton precipitation prior to substorms and the proton intensity only doubles at substorm onset while the electron auroral brightness increases on average by a factor of 5 and sometimes by as much as a factor of 10. Substorm onset occurs in the central region of the pre-existing proton precipitation. Assuming that nightside protons are precipitating from a quasi-stable ring current at its outer regions where the field lines are distorted by neutral sheet currents we can associate the onset location with this region of closed but distorted field lines relatively close to the earth. Our results also show that protons are present in the initial poleward substorm expansion however later they are over taken by the electrons. We also find that the intensity of the substorms as quantified by the intensity of the post onset electron precipitation is correlated with the intensity of the proton precipitation prior to the substorms, highlighting the role of the pre-existing near earth plasma in the production of the next substorm. [less ▲]

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See detailSummary of quantitative interpretation of IMAGE far ultraviolet auroral data
Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.; Immel, T. J. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2003), 109

Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by instruments on the IMAGE spacecraft is supplemented by simultaneous observations of the global aurora in three far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelength bands. The purpose of ... [more ▼]

Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by instruments on the IMAGE spacecraft is supplemented by simultaneous observations of the global aurora in three far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelength bands. The purpose of the multi-wavelength imaging is to study the global auroral particle and energy input from the magnetosphere into the atmosphere. This paper describes the method for quantitative interpretation of FUV measurements. The Wide-Band Imaging Camera (WIC) provides broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora with maximum spatial resolution by imaging the nitrogen lines and bands between 140 and 180 nm wavelength. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a dual wavelength monochromatic instrument, images both Doppler-shifted Lyman-alpha emissions produced by precipitating protons, in the SI-12 channel and OI 135.6 nm emissions in the SI-13 channel. From the SI-12 Doppler shifted Lyman-alpha images it is possible to obtain the precipitating proton flux provided assumptions are made regarding the mean energy of the protons. Knowledge of the proton (flux and energy) component allows the calculation of the contribution produced by protons in the WIC and SI-13 instruments. Comparison of the corrected WIC and SI-13 signals provides a measure of the electron mean energy, which can then be used to determine the electron energy flux. To accomplish this, reliable emission modeling and instrument calibrations are required. In-flight calibration using early-type stars was used to validate the pre-flight laboratory calibrations and determine long-term trends in sensitivity. In general, very reasonable agreement is found between in-situ measurements and remote quantitative determinations. [less ▲]

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See detailFar ultraviolet imaging from the IMAGE spacecraft. 3. Spectral imaging of Lyman-alpha and OI 135.6 nm
Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2000), 91

Two FUV Spectral imaging instruments, the Spectrographic Imager (SI) and the Geocorona Photometer (GEO) provide IMAGE with simultaneous global maps of the hydrogen (121.8 nm) and oxygen 135.6 nm ... [more ▼]

Two FUV Spectral imaging instruments, the Spectrographic Imager (SI) and the Geocorona Photometer (GEO) provide IMAGE with simultaneous global maps of the hydrogen (121.8 nm) and oxygen 135.6 nm components of the terrestrial aurora and with observations of the three dimensional distribution of neutral hydrogen in the magnetosphere (121.6 nm). The SI is a novel instrument type, in which spectral separation and imaging functions are independent of each other. In this instrument, two-dimensional images are produced on two detectors, and the images are spectrally filtered by a spectrograph part of the instrument. One of the two detectors images the Doppler-shifted Lyman-alpha while rejecting the geocoronal `cold' Ly-alpha, and another detector images the OI 135.6 nm emission. The spectrograph is an all-reflective Wadsworth configuration in which a grill arrangement is used to block most of the cold, un-Doppler-shifted geocoronal emission at 121.567 nm. The SI calibration established that the upper limit of transmission at cold geocoronal Ly-alpha is less than 2%. The measured light collecting efficiency was 0.01 and 0.008 cm^2 at 121.8 and at 135.6 nm, respectively. This is consistent with the size of the input aperture, the optical transmission, and the photocathode efficiency. The expected sensitivity is 1.8x10^-2 and 1.3x10^-2 counts per Rayleigh per pixel for each 5 s viewing exposure per satellite revolution (120 s). The measured spatial resolution is better than the 128x128 pixel matrix over the 15 degx15 deg field of view in both wavelength channels. The SI detectors are photon counting devices using the cross delay line principle. In each detector a triple stack microchannel plate (MCP) amplifies the photo-electronic charge which is then deposited on a specially configured anode array. The position of the photon event is measured by digitizing the time delay between the pulses detected at each end of the anode structures. This scheme is intrinsically faster than systems that use charge division and it has a further advantage that it saturates more gradually at high count rates. The geocoronal Ly-alpha is measured by a three-channel photometer system (GEO) which is a separate instrument. Each photometer has a built in MgF_2 lens to restrict the field of view to one degree and a ceramic electron multiplier with a KBr photocathode. One of the tubes is pointing radially outward perpendicular to the axis of satellite rotation. The optic of the other two subtend 60 deg with the rotation axis. These instruments take data continuously at 3 samples per second and rely on the combination of satellite rotation and orbital motion to scan the hydrogen cloud surrounding the earth. The detective efficiencies (effective quantum efficiency including windows) of the three tubes at Ly-alpha are between 6 and 10%. [less ▲]

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See detailFar ultraviolet imaging from the IMAGE spacecraft. 1. System design
Mende, S. B.; Heetderks, H.; Frey, H. U. et al

in Space Science Reviews (2000), 91

Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora, the footprint of magnetospheric regions. To assure the simultaneity of these ... [more ▼]

Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by the IMAGE spacecraft will be supplemented by observation of the global aurora, the footprint of magnetospheric regions. To assure the simultaneity of these observations and the measurement of the magnetospheric background neutral gas density, the IMAGE satellite instrument complement includes three Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instruments. In the wavelength region 120-190 nm, a downward-viewing auroral imager is only minimally contaminated by sunlight, scattered from clouds and ground, and radiance of the aurora observed in a nadir viewing geometry can be observed in the presence of the high-latitude dayglow. The Wideband Imaging Camera (WIC) will provide broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora for maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the LBH N_2 bands of the aurora. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a monochromatic imager, will image different types of aurora, filtered by wavelength. By measuring the Doppler-shifted Ly-alpha, the proton-induced component of the aurora will be imaged separately. Finally, the GEO instrument will observe the distribution of the geocoronal emission, which is a measure of the neutral background density source for charge exchange in the magnetosphere. The FUV instrument complement looks radially outward from the rotating IMAGE satellite and, therefore, it spends only a short time observing the aurora and the Earth during each spin. Detailed descriptions of the WIC, SI, GEO, and their individual performance validations are discussed in companion papers. This paper summarizes the system requirements and system design approach taken to satisfy the science requirements. One primary requirement is to maximize photon collection efficiency and use efficiently the short time available for exposures. The FUV auroral imagers WIC and SI both have wide fields of view and take data continuously as the auroral region proceeds through the field of view. To minimize data volume, multiple images are taken and electronically co-added by suitably shifting each image to compensate for the spacecraft rotation. In order to minimize resolution loss, the images have to be distortion-corrected in real time for both WIC and SI prior to co-adding. The distortion correction is accomplished using high speed look up tables that are pre-generated by least square fitting to polynomial functions by the on-orbit processor. The instruments were calibrated individually while on stationery platforms, mostly in vacuum chambers as described in the companion papers. Extensive ground-based testing was performed with visible and near UV simulators mounted on a rotating platform to estimate their on-orbit performance. The predicted instrument system performance is summarized and some of the preliminary data formats are shown. [less ▲]

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See detailReport on the Scientific Interest and Problems
Swings, Polydore ULg

in Space Science Reviews (1963), 1

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