References of "Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism"
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See detailA consensus statement on the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis - From evidence-based medicine to the real-life setting.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C.; Pelletier, J.P. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2016), 45(4 Suppl), 3-11

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis(ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014,which provides ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis(ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014,which provides practical guidance for the prioritization of interventions. Further analysis of real-world data for OA provides additional evidence in support of pharmacological interventions,in terms of management of OA pain and function, avoidance of adverse events, disease-modifying effects and long-term outcomes, e.g., delay of total joint replacement surgery, and pharmacoeconomic factors such as reduction in healthcare resource utilization. This article provides an updated assessment of the literature for selected interventions in OA, focusing on real-life data, with the aim of providing easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment flow in patients with knee OA in primary care clinical practice, in support of the clinicians’ individualized assessment of the patient. In step 1, background maintenance therapy with symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) is recommended, for which high-quality evidence is provided only for the prescription formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. Paracetamol may be added for rescue analgesia only,due to limited efficacy and increasing safety signals. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may provide additional symptomatic treatment with the same degree of efficacy as oral NSAIDs without the systemic safety concerns. Oral NSAIDs maintain a central role in step2 Advanced management of persistent symptoms. However, oral NSAIDs are highly heterogeneous in terms of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety profile, and patient stratification with careful treatment selection is advocated to maximize the risk: benefit ratio. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid as a next step provides sustained clinical benefit with effects lasting up to 6 months after a short-course of weekly injections. As a last step before surgery, thes low titration of sustained-release tramadol, aweak opioid, affords sustained analgesia with improved tolerability. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimizing the management of osteoarthritis-Transitioning evidence-based guidelines into practical guidance for real-world clinical practice
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, C.

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2016), 45(4 Suppl), 1-2

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See detailEfficacy and safety of glucosamine sulfate in the management of osteoarthritis: Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Altman, R.D.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2016), 45(4 Suppl), 12-17

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends chronic symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends chronic symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) including glucosamine sulfate (GS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) as first-line therapy for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Numerous studies are published on the use of SYSADOAs in OA; however, the efficacy of this class is still called into question largely due to the regulatory status, labeling and availability of these medications which differ substantially across the world. Examination of the evidence for the prescription patented crystalline GS (pCGS) formulation at a dose of 1500 mg once-daily demonstrates superiority overother GS and glucosamine hydrochloride (GH) formulations and dosage regimens. Thus, the ESCEO task force advocates differentiation of prescription pCGS over other glucosamine preparations. Long-term clinical trials andreal-life studies show that pCGS may delay joint structural changes, suggesting potential benefit beyond symptom control when used early in the management of knee OA. Real-life pharmacoeconomic studies demonstrate a long-term reduction in the need for additional pain analgesia and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with pCGS, with a significant reduction of over 50% in costs associated with medications, healthcare consultations and examinations over 12 months. Furthermore, treatment with pCGS for at least 12 months leads to a reduction in the need for total joint replacement for at least 5 years following treatment cessation. Thus, pCGS(1500 mg od) is a logical choice to maximize clinical benefit in OA patients, with demonstrated medium-term control of pain and lasting impact on disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of diet and exercise and of glucosamine sulfate in the prevention of knee osteoarthritis: Further results from the PRevention of knee Osteoarthritis in Overweight Females (PROOF) study.
Runhaar, J.; DEROISY, Rita ULg; van Middelkoop, M. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2016), 45(4 Suppl), 42-48

Background and objectives: The PRevention of knee Osteoarthritis in Overweight Females(PROOF) study (ISRCTN42823086) described a trend for a decrease in the incidence of kneeo steoarthritis (OA) by a ... [more ▼]

Background and objectives: The PRevention of knee Osteoarthritis in Overweight Females(PROOF) study (ISRCTN42823086) described a trend for a decrease in the incidence of kneeo steoarthritis (OA) by a tailored diet and exercise program (DEP)or by oral glucosamine sulfate in women at risk for the disease, using a composite clinical and/or radiological outcome. The aim of this updated post-hoc analysis was to re-assess the results according to more precise techniques and take advantage of the 2 x 2 factorial design. Methods: A total of 407 overweight( BMI > or egal 27kg/m2) women of 50–60 years of age with no diagnosis of knee OA were randomized to: (1) noDEP + placebo(Control, N = 102), (2) DEP + placebo (DEP, N = 101), (3) glucosamine sulfate + no DEP (GS, N = 102), and (4) DEP + glucosamine sulfate (DEP + GS, N = 102) and followed for 2.5 years, with standardized postero-anterior, semiflexed (MTP) view knee radiographs at baseline and end of the study. DEP consisted of a tailored low fat and/or low caloric diet and easy to implement physical activities. Glucosamine was given as oral crystalline glucosamine sulfate 1500 mg once daily ,double-blinded vs. placebo. Incident knee OA was defined as radiographic progression of >1mm minimum joint space narrowing (mJSN)in the medial tibiofemoral compartment, as previously assessed by the visual (manual) technique and by a new semi-automated method. Logistic regression analysis was used t ocalculate the odds ratio for the effect of the interventions. Results: After 2.5 years, 11.8% of control subjects developed knee OA. This incidence was decreased with glucosamine sulfate, either alone or in combination with the DEP, but not by the DEP alone. Since there was no statistical interaction between treatments, the 2x2 factorial design allowed analysis of patients receiving glucosamine sulfate (N = 204) vs. those not receiving it (N= 203), similarly for those on the DEP (N = 203) or not (N = 204). Glucosamine sulfate significantly decreased the risk of developing knee OA: odds ratio (OR) = 0.41(95% CI: 0.20–0.85, P = 0.02) by the manual JSN assessment method and OR = 0.42 (95% CI:0.20–0.92, P =0.03) by the semi-automated technique. Conversely, there was no decrease in risk with the DEP. Conclusions: Glucosamine sulfate decreased the risk of developing radiographic knee OA over 2.5 years in overweight, middle-aged women at risk, as determined by medial mJSN progression. Conversely a tailored diet and exercise program exerted no preventive effect, possibly because of the lower than expected effect on weigh tloss. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and safety of hyaluronic acid in the management of osteoarthritis : Evidence from real-life setting trials and surveys.
Maheu, E.; Rannou, F.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2016), 45(4 Suppl), 28-33

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends intra-articular (IA) hyaluronic acid (HA) for management of knee ... [more ▼]

The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) treatment algorithm recommends intra-articular (IA) hyaluronic acid (HA) for management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) as second-line treatment in patients who remain symptomatic despite use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). This recommendation is based upon accumulating evidence that IA HA provides a significant benefit in knee OA. There is good evidence that IA HA injections reduce pain and increase function in knee OA, and the benefits are long-lasting as compared with IA corticosteroids. Evidence from real-life studies of repeat courses of IA HA demonstrates an improvement in pain or function lasting up to 40 months (12 months after the last injection cycle), a reduction in use of concomitant analgesia by up to 50%, and suggests that there may be a delay in the need for total knee replacement (TKR) of around 2 years. The clinical benefit of IA HA on knee OA may be 2-fold: (i) mechanical viscosupplementation of the joint (allowing lubrication and shock absorption) and (ii) the re-establishment of joint homeostasis through induction of endogenous HA production, which continues long after the exogenous injection has left the joint.The magnitude of the clinical effect may be different for different HA products, but this has not been proven so far and requires further investigation. IA HA injections are generally considered to be safe,although a slightly higher number of cases of local reactions and post-injection non-septic arthritis has been reported with high molecular weight cross-linked HAs. The use of IA HA in knee OA patients with mild–moderate disease, and for more severe patients wishing to delay TKR surgery,is recommended by the ESCEO taskforce. Further investigation into the OA patient types most likely to benefit from IA HA is warranted. Viscosupplementation with IA HA is a safe and effective component of the multi-modal management of knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailCommentary on recent therapeutic guidelines for osteoarthritis
Cutolo, M; Berenbaum, F; Hochberg, M et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2015), 44

Background Despite availability of international evidence-based guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) management, agreement on the different treatment modalities is lacking. Method A symposium of European ... [more ▼]

Background Despite availability of international evidence-based guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) management, agreement on the different treatment modalities is lacking. Method A symposium of European and US OA experts was held within the framework of the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology to discuss and compare guidelines and recommendations for the treatment of knee OA and to reach a consensus for management, particularly for areas in which there is no clear consensus: non-pharmacological therapy; efficacy and safety of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); intra-articular (i.a.) hyaluronates (HA); and the role of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and/or glucosamine sulfate (GS). Results All guidelines reviewed agree that knee OA is a progressive disease of the joint whose management requires non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Discrepancies between guidelines are few and mostly reflect heterogeneity of expert panels involved, geographical differences in the availability of pharmacotherapies, and heterogeneity of studies included. Panels chosen for guideline development should include experts with real clinical experience in drug use and patient management. Implementation of agreed guidelines can be thwarted by drug availability and reimbursement plans, resulting in optimal OA treatment being jeopardized, HA and symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SySADOAs) being clear examples of drugs whose availability and prescription can greatly vary geographically. In addition, primary care providers, often responsible for OA management (at least in early disease), may not adhere to clinical care guidelines, particularly for non-pharmacological OA treatment. Conclusion Harmonization of the recommendations for knee OA treatment is challenging but feasible, as shown by the step-by-step therapeutic algorithm developed by European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO). More easily disseminated and implemented guidance for OA treatment in the primary care setting is key to improved management of OA. [less ▲]

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See detailImportance of synovitis in osteoarthritis: Evidence for the use of glycosaminoglycans against synovial inflammation.
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Lambert, Cécile ULg; Richette, Pascal

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2014), 43(5), 579-87

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See detailAn algorithm recommendation for the management of knee osteoarthritis in Europe and internationally: A report from a task force of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C; Pelletier, JP et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2014), 44

Objectives: Existing practice guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) analyze the evidence behind each proposed treatment but do not prioritize the interventions in a given sequence. The objective was to ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Existing practice guidelines for osteoarthritis (OA) analyze the evidence behind each proposed treatment but do not prioritize the interventions in a given sequence. The objective was to develop a treatment algorithm recommendation that is easier to interpret for the prescribing physician based on the available evidence and that is applicable in Europe and internationally. The knee was used as the model OA joint. Methods: ESCEO assembled a task force of 13 international experts (rheumatologists, clinical epidemiologists, and clinical scientists). Existing guidelines were reviewed; all interventions listed and recent evidence were retrieved using established databases. A first schematic flow chart with treatment prioritization was discussed in a 1-day meeting and shaped to the treatment algorithm. Fine-tuning occurred by electronic communication and three consultation rounds until consensus. Results: Basic principles consist of the need for a combined pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment with a core set of initial measures, including information access/education, weight loss if overweight, and an appropriate exercise program. Four multimodal steps are then established. Step 1 consists of background therapy, either non-pharmacological (referral to a physical therapist for re-alignment treatment if needed and sequential introduction of further physical interventions initially and at any time thereafter) or pharmacological. The latter consists of chronic Symptomatic Slow-Acting Drugs for OA (e.g., prescription glucosamine sulfate and/or chondroitin sulfate) with paracetamol at-need; topical NSAIDs are added in the still symptomatic patient. Step 2 consists of the advanced pharmacological management in the persistent symptomatic patient and is centered on the use of oral COX-2 selective or non-selective NSAIDs, chosen based on concomitant risk factors, with intra-articular corticosteroids or hyaluronate for further symptom relief if insufficient. In Step 3, the last pharmacological attempts before surgery are represented by weak opioids and other central analgesics. Finally, Step 4 consists of end-stage disease management and surgery, with classical opioids as a difficult-to-manage alternative when surgery is contraindicated. Conclusions: The proposed treatment algorithm may represent a new framework for the development of future guidelines for the management of OA, more easily accessible to physicians. © 2014 The Authors. [less ▲]

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See detailHealth economics in the field of osteoarthritis: An Expert's consensus paper from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2013), 43(3), 303-313

OBJECTIVES: There is an important need to evaluate therapeutic approaches for osteoarthritis (OA) in terms of cost-effectiveness as well as efficacy. METHODS: The ESCEO expert working group met to discuss ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: There is an important need to evaluate therapeutic approaches for osteoarthritis (OA) in terms of cost-effectiveness as well as efficacy. METHODS: The ESCEO expert working group met to discuss the epidemiological and economic evidence that justifies the increasing concern of the impact of this disease and reviewed the current state-of-the-art in health economic studies in this field. RESULTS: OA is a debilitating disease; it is increasing in frequency and is associated with a substantial and growing burden on society, in terms of both burden of illness and cost of illness. Economic evaluations in this field are relatively rare, and those that do exist, show considerable heterogeneity of methodological approach (such as indicated population, comparator, decision context and perspective, time horizon, modeling and outcome measures used). This heterogeneity makes comparisons between studies problematic. CONCLUSIONS: Better adherence to guidelines for economic evaluations is needed. There was strong support for the definition of a reference case and for what might constitute "standard optimal care" in terms of best clinical practice, for the control arms of interventional studies. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of agents to be used in the prevention and treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis: updated recommendations from the Group for the Respect of Ethics and Excellence in Science.
Abadie, Eric ULg; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Ringe, Johann D. et al

in Seminars in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2005), 35(1), 1-4

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The Group for the Respect and Excellence in Science (GREES) has reviewed and updated their recommendations for clinical trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new chemical entities to be used in the treatment and prevention of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). METHODS: Consensus discussion of the committee. RESULTS: With the exception of steroid use posttransplantation, there is no need to differentiate between underlying diseases. Prevention and treatment for GIOP are dependent on exposure to glucocorticoids rather than T-scores as in postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). If fracture data are obtained for PMO, it need not be repeated for GIOP, relying instead on bone mineral density (BMD) trials of at least 1 year. GREES recommends several changes in the previous guidance for GIOP. The committee saw no need to repeat preclinical studies if those have been previously done to assure bone quality in PMO. Similarly, phase I and phase II trials, if careful dose selection has been done for PMO, should not be repeated. The "prevention" and "treatment" claims should remain. Since the most recent evidence suggests significant increase in fracture risk for daily doses of prednisone of 5 mg/day or equivalent, clinical trials should concentrate on patients receiving at least this daily dosage. The emergence of bisphosphonates as the reference treatment, together with the rapid bone loss and high fracture incidence in glucocorticoid users, necessitates recommending a noninferiority trial design with lumbar spine BMD as the primary endpoint after 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Registration of new chemical entities to be used in the management of GIOP should be granted, based on a 1-year noninferiority trial, using BMD as primary outcome and alendronate or risedronate as comparator. Demonstration of antifracture efficacy should have been previously demonstrated in PMO. [less ▲]

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