References of "Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports"
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See detailMuscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2013), 23(4), 501-7

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized ... [more ▼]

Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized lengthening contractions has been well described, the reasons underlying this phenomenon have not yet been understood. Therefore, this study investigated a possible correlation of the changes in muscle damage indirect markers after an eccentric exercise with the decline in muscle performance during the exercise. Twenty-seven healthy untrained male subjects performed three sets of 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. The muscular work was recorded using an isokinetic dynamometer to assess muscle fatigue by means of various fatigue indices. Plasma CK activity, muscle soreness, and stiffness were measured before (pre) and one day after (post) exercise. The eccentric exercise bout induced significant changes of the three muscle damage indirect markers. Large intersubject variability was observed for all criteria measured. More interestingly, the log (CKpost/CKpre) and muscle stiffness appeared to be closely correlated with the relative work decrease (r = 0.84, r2 = 0.70 and r = 0.75, r2 = 0.56, respectively). This is the first study to propose that the muscle fatigue profile during maximal eccentric protocol could predict the magnitude of the symptoms associated with muscle damage in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy of pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection in indoor sport climbing
Sanchez, Xavier; Lambert, Philippe ULg; Jones, G. et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2012), 22

Pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection (route preview) has been suggested as a key climbing performance para- meter although its role has never been verified experimentally. We examined the efficacy ... [more ▼]

Pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection (route preview) has been suggested as a key climbing performance para- meter although its role has never been verified experimentally. We examined the efficacy of this perceptual-cognitive skill on indoor sport climbing performance. Twenty-nine male climbers, divided into intermediate, advanced and expert climbing level groups, climbed two indoor sport routes matching their climbing level and, where applicable, routes below their climbing level. At each level, one route was climbed with a preview, where participants benefited from a 3-min pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection. Performance was assessed in terms of output (route comple- tion) and form (number and duration of moves and stops). Route preview did not influence the output performance. Climbers using visual inspection were no more likely to finish the ascent than those without the option of using visual inspection. Conversely, route preview did influence form performance; climbers made fewer, and shorter stops during their ascent following a preview of the route. Form performances differences remained when baseline ability levels were taken into account, although for shorter duration of stops only with expert climbers benefiting most from route preview. The ability to visually inspect a climb before its ascent may represent an essential component of performance optimization. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociation between preseason functional tests and injuries in youth football: a prospective follow-up
Frisch, Anne ULg; Urhausen, Axel; Seil, Romain et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2011), 21(6), 468-76

This prospective cohort study aimed at identifying player-related risk factors for injuries in youth football as determined by extensive preseasonal screening. All male U15-U19 players from a regional ... [more ▼]

This prospective cohort study aimed at identifying player-related risk factors for injuries in youth football as determined by extensive preseasonal screening. All male U15-U19 players from a regional football school (season 2007-2008; n = 67) underwent preseason evaluations assessing physical fatigue, emotional stress and injury history (questionnaire), anthropometric variables, general joint laxity (Beighton score), lower limb coordination (functional hop tests), aerobic fitness (shuttle run test), strength of knee extensor and flexor muscles (isokinetic tests), static and dynamic balance (force plate tests), and explosive strength (jump tests on force plate). Football exposure and all football-related injuries (n = 163) were recorded during the entire subsequent season (44 weeks). Total injury incidence was 10.4 injuries/1000  h and was higher in competition than in training [relative risk = 3.3; CI(95%) (2.39; 4.54); P < 0.001]. Lower limb injuries were most frequent (87%). Acute contact injuries represented 37%, while intrinsic (noncontact and chronic) injuries amounted to 63%. Of all the variables tested, only physical fatigue was significantly associated with injury, as revealed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The same result was observed when considering only intrinsic injuries as outcome. A single preseason test session may be of limited interest in the framework of an injury prevention strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of sex-specific injury patterns and risk factors in young high-level athletes
Frisch, Anne ULg; Seil, Romain; Urhausen, Axel et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2009), 19

This study analyzed sex-specific injury patterns and risk factors in young athletes (n=256) from 12 sport disciplines practicing at the national or the international level in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg ... [more ▼]

This study analyzed sex-specific injury patterns and risk factors in young athletes (n=256) from 12 sport disciplines practicing at the national or the international level in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. Injury occurrence as a result of sport practice was analyzed retrospectively over the year 2006 using a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Overall incidence was not different between girls and boys (1.20 and 1.21 injuries/1000 athlete-hours, respectively), but in the context of team sport competition girls tended to be at a greater risk (rate ratio 2.05, P=0.053). Girls had a higher proportion of injuries in the ankle/foot region compared with boys (34.8% vs 16.8%). No sex-related differences were found regarding injury severity. Multivariate logistic regression (controlling for age and practice volume) revealed that girls' team sports were associated with a greater injury risk compared with individual sports [odds ratio (OR) of 4.76], while in boys this was observed for racket sports (OR=3.31). Furthermore, physical or emotional stress tended to be a specific risk factor in girls. There was a tendency for injury outside sports to be coupled to a higher injury risk in girls and boys. Consideration of sex-specific injury patterns and risk factors could be of importance for effective injury prevention. [less ▲]

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See detailMuscular strength, functional performances and injury risk in professional and junior elite soccer players.
Lehance, Cédric ULg; Binet, J.; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports (2009), 19(2), 243-51

Muscle strength and anaerobic power of the lower extremities are neuromuscular variables that influence performance in many sports activities, including soccer. Despite frequent contradictions in the ... [more ▼]

Muscle strength and anaerobic power of the lower extremities are neuromuscular variables that influence performance in many sports activities, including soccer. Despite frequent contradictions in the literature, it may be assumed that muscle strength and balance play a key role in targeted acute muscle injuries. The purpose of the present study was to provide and compare pre-season muscular strength and power profiles in professional and junior elite soccer players throughout the developmental years of 15-21. One original aspect of our study was that isokinetic data were considered alongside the past history of injury in these players. Fifty-seven elite and junior elite male soccer players were assigned to three groups: PRO, n=19; U-21, n=20 and U-17, n=18. Players benefited from knee flexor and extensor isokinetic testing consisting of concentric and eccentric exercises. A context of lingering muscle disorder was defined using statistically selected cut-offs. Functional performance was evaluated throughout a squat jump and 10 m sprint. The PRO group ran faster and jumped higher than the U-17 group (P<0.05). No significant difference in isokinetic muscle strength performance was observed between the three groups when considering normalized body mass parameters. Individual isokinetic profiles enabled the identification of 32/57 (56%) subjects presenting lower limb muscular imbalance. Thirty-six out of 57 players were identified as having sustained a previous major lower limb injury. Of these 36 players, 23 still showed significant muscular imbalance (64%). New trends in rational training could focus more on the risk of imbalance and implement antagonist strengthening aimed at injury prevention. Such an intervention would benefit not only athletes recovering from injury, but also uninjured players. An interdisciplinary approach involving trainers, a physical coach, and medical staff would be of interest to consider in implementing a prevention programme. [less ▲]

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