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See detailNot at Home in the World: Abject Mobilities in Marie NDiaye’s Trois femmes puissantes and NoViolet Bulawayo’s We Need New Names
Toivanen, Anna-Leena ULg

in Postcolonial Text (2015), 10(1), 1-18

The theme of mobility recurs frequently in the works of third-generation novelists. This article focuses on two recent Africa-affiliated novels, namely We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo and Trois ... [more ▼]

The theme of mobility recurs frequently in the works of third-generation novelists. This article focuses on two recent Africa-affiliated novels, namely We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo and Trois femmes puissantes by Marie NDiaye. While these two texts employ very different narrative and stylistic means, they both explore the thematic of mobility with pronouncedly abject connotations. In Bulawayo’s novel, abjection is the condition of the crisis-ridden postcolonial nation-state and it also marks the characters associated with this abject context through national affiliation. NDiaye’s approach to abjection focuses on the psychological and the private, but the roots of abjection in her novel can be traced back to the multivalent aftermath of the colonial enterprise in Africa and the contemporary mobilities it has generated. Both novels draw attention to the complex reasons behind abject African mobilities and why they become defined as such in the first place. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationality and the Transnational Indian Family in Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Nothing Must Spoil This Visit”
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Postcolonial Text (2011), 6(1),

In Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Nothing Must Spoil this Visit,” Arvind, a Toronto-based Sikh, returns to the homeland to visit his family with his new wife Janet, a white Canadian of Hungarian origin. Drawing ... [more ▼]

In Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Nothing Must Spoil this Visit,” Arvind, a Toronto-based Sikh, returns to the homeland to visit his family with his new wife Janet, a white Canadian of Hungarian origin. Drawing on Sara Ahmed’s critique of the general consensus within post-colonial theory that automatically conflates migration with the transgression of boundaries and the destabilisation of identity, this article discusses Baldwin’s short story with a view to showing how the Indian context proves crucial in deconstructing the intersecting forms of fetishism upon which Arvind’s and Janet’s multicultural and inter-relationship is based. In this return narrative, it is striking that the transnational tendencies of the contemporary world are definitely not an occasion for creating more border-crossings, more plurality, more confrontations and interaction. The encounter with otherness is indeed presented by Baldwin as always-already framed by broader relations of power that are far from being acknowledged as such. What is at stake in this text, I argue, is the somehow counterintuitive truth that migration might well work in favour of, not against, fixed notions of identity. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Ambiguous "Freedom Song": Mind-Style in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Purple Hibiscus
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Postcolonial Text (2009), 5(1), 1-18

This article attempts a stylistic analysis of Purple Hibiscus (2003), the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Using Roger Fowler's concept of "mind-style" and Halliday and Matthiessen ... [more ▼]

This article attempts a stylistic analysis of Purple Hibiscus (2003), the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Using Roger Fowler's concept of "mind-style" and Halliday and Matthiessen's functional grammar, the essay examines the language of the book's first-person narrator, a fifteen-year-old girl whose father is a violent Catholic extremist. It is argued that the unveiling of linguistic patterns in her account leads to a deeper understanding of the concepts of freedom and tyranny in the novel. Thus, while the narrator's deceptively simple style initially conceals her prejudices, it gradually grows into a more straightforward type of language as the character liberates herself from her father's authoritarian grip. [less ▲]

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