References of "Plant and Soil"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChemical soil factors influencing plant assemblages along copper-cobalt gradients: implications for conservation and restoration
Seleck, Maxime ULg; Bizoux, Jean-Philippe ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg et al

in Plant and Soil (2013), 373

Aims Define the chemical factors structuring plant communities of three copper-cobalt outcrops (Tenke-Fungurume, Katangan Copperbelt, D. R. Congo) presenting extreme gradients. Methods To discriminate ... [more ▼]

Aims Define the chemical factors structuring plant communities of three copper-cobalt outcrops (Tenke-Fungurume, Katangan Copperbelt, D. R. Congo) presenting extreme gradients. Methods To discriminate plant communities, 172 vegetation records of all species percentage cover were classified based on NMDS and the Calinski criterion. Soil samples were analyzed for 13 chemical factors and means compared among communities with ANOVA. Partial canonical correspondence analysis (pCCA) was used to determine amount of variation explained individually by each factor and site effect. Results Seven communities were identified. Six of the studied communities were related to distinct sites. Site effect (6.0 % of global inertia) was identified as the most important factor related to plant communities’ variation followed by Cu (5.5 %), pH (3.6 %) and Co (3.5 %). Unique contribution of site effect (3.8 %) was higher than that of Cu (1.1 %) and Co (1.0 %). Conclusions In restoration, not only Cu and Co contents will be important to maintain vegetation diversity, attention should also be given to co-varying factors potentially limiting toxicity of metals: pH, organic matter, Ca and Mn. Physical parameters were also identified as important in the creation of adequate conditions for diverse communities. Further studies should focus on the effect of physical parameters and geology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (28 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAOB community structure and richness under European beech, sessile oak, Norway spruce and Douglas-fir at three temperate forest sites
Malchair, Sandrine ULg; Carnol, Monique ULg

in Plant and Soil (2013), 366(1-2),

Abstract Background and aims The relations between tree species, microbial diversity and activity can alter ecosystem functioning. We investigated ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community structure and ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background and aims The relations between tree species, microbial diversity and activity can alter ecosystem functioning. We investigated ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community structure and richness, microbial/environmental factors related to AOB diversity and the relationship between AOB diversity and the nitrification process under several tree species. Methods Forest floor (Of, Oh) was sampled under European beech, sessile oak, Norway spruce and Douglas-fir at three sites. AOB community structure was assessed by PCR-DGGE and sequencing. Samples were analyzed for net N mineralization, potential nitrification, basal respiration, microbial biomass, microbial or metabolic quotient, pH, total nitrogen, extractable ammonium, organic matter content and exchangeable cations. Results AOB community structure and tree species effect on AOB diversity were site-specific. AOB richness was not related to nitrification. Factors regulating ammonium availability, i.e. net N mineralization or microbial biomass, were related to AOB community structure. Conclusion Our research shows that, at larger spatial scales, site specific characteristics may be more important than the nature of tree species in determining AOB diversity (richness and community structure). Within sites, tree species influence AOB diversity. The absence of a relation between AOB richness and nitrification points to a possibly role of AOB abundance, phenotypic plasticity or the implication of ammonia oxidizing archaea. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (17 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEstimating the parameters of a 3-D root distribution function from root observations with the trench profile method: case study with simulated and field-observed root data
Vansteenkiste, Joachim; Van Loon, Jelle; Garré, Sarah ULg et al

in Plant and Soil (2013)

Background and Aims Root length density (RLD) is a parameter that is difficult to measure, but crucial to estimate water and nutrient uptake by plants. In this study a novel approach is presented to ... [more ▼]

Background and Aims Root length density (RLD) is a parameter that is difficult to measure, but crucial to estimate water and nutrient uptake by plants. In this study a novel approach is presented to characterize the 3-D root length distribution by supplementing data of the 3-D distribution of root intersections with data of root length density from a limited number of soil cores. Methods The method was evaluated in a virtual experiment using the RootTyp model and a field experiment with cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. botrytis) and leek (Allium porrum, L.). Results The virtual experiment shows that total root length and root length distribution can be accurately estimated using the novel approach. Implementation of the method in a field experiment was successful for characterizing the growth of the root distribution with time both for cauliflower and leek. In contrast with the virtual experiment, total root length could not be estimated based upon root intersection measurements in the field. Conclusions The novel method of combining root intersection data with root length density data from core samples is a powerful tool to supply root water uptake models with root system information. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCopper tolerance in the cuprophyte Haumaniastrum katangense (S. Moore) P.A. Duvign. & Plancke
Chipeng, François; Hermans, Christian; Colinet, Gilles ULg et al

in Plant and Soil (2010), 328(1-2), 235-244

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow do climate warming and plant species richness affect water use in experimental grasslands?
De Boeck, H. J.; Lemmens, CMHM; Bossuyt, H. et al

in Plant and Soil (2006), 288

Climate warming and plant species richness loss have been the subject of numerous experiments, but studies on their combined impact are lacking. Here we studied how both warming and species richness loss ... [more ▼]

Climate warming and plant species richness loss have been the subject of numerous experiments, but studies on their combined impact are lacking. Here we studied how both warming and species richness loss affect water use in grasslands, while identifying interactions between these global changes. Experimental ecosystems containing one, three or nine grassland species from three functional groups were grown in 12 sunlit, climate-controlled chambers (2.25 m(2) ground area) in Wilrijk, Belgium. Half of these chambers were exposed to ambient air temperatures (unheated), while the other half were warmed by 3 degrees C (heated). Equal amounts of water were added to heated and unheated communities, so that warming would imply drier soils if evapotranspiration (ET) was higher. After an initial ET increase in response to warming, stomatal regulation and lower above-ground productivity resulted in ET values comparable with those recorded in the unheated communities. As a result of the decreased biomass production, water use efficiency (WUE) was reduced by warming. Higher complementarity and the improved competitive success of water-efficient species in mixtures led to an increased WUE in multi-species communities as compared to monocultures, regardless of the induced warming. However, since the WUE of individual species was affected in different ways by higher temperatures, compositional changes in mixtures seem likely under climatic change due to shifts in competitiveness. In conclusion, while increased complementarity and selection of water-efficient species ensured more efficient water use in mixtures than monocultures, global warming will likely decrease this WUE, and this may be most pronounced in species-rich communities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the invasive alien plant Solidago giganteaon primary productivity, plant nutrient content and soil mineral nutrient concentrations
Vanderhoeven, SONIA ULg; Dassonville, Nicolas; Chapuis-Lardy, Lydie et al

in Plant and Soil (2006), 286(1-2), 259-268

Invasion by alien plants can alter ecosystem processes and soil properties. In this study, we compared aboveground productivity, nutrient pools in standing biomass and topsoil (0-0.10 m) mineral nutrient ... [more ▼]

Invasion by alien plants can alter ecosystem processes and soil properties. In this study, we compared aboveground productivity, nutrient pools in standing biomass and topsoil (0-0.10 m) mineral nutrient concentrations between plots invaded by Early Goldenrod (Solidago gigantea) and adjacent, uninvaded, vegetation at five sites in Belgium. The five sites were characterised by a resident perennial herbaceous vegetation and spanned a wide range in soil fertility level and floristic composition. Invaded stands consistently had higher (2-3-fold) aboveground productivity and lower mineral element concentrations in standing phytomass. Nutrient pools (calculated as concentration x phytomass) was ca. twice higher in invaded plots, suggesting that S. gigantea might enhance nutrient cycling rates. Impacts on topsoil chemistry were surprisingly modest, with slightly higher nutrient concentrations under the invader. A noticeable exception was phosphorus, which showed higher concentrations of ammonium acetate-extractable fraction in invaded plots in four of five sites. It appears that S. gigantea does not significantly contribute to nutrient uplift from deep soil layers to topsoil, possibly because it does not root much deeper compared to resident vegetation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLignosulfonate promotes the interaction between Scots pine and an ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius in vitro
Niemi, Karoliina; Kevers, Claire ULg; Haggman, Hely

in Plant and Soil (2005), 271(1-2), 243-249

Lignosulfonate (LS) is a lignin-based polymer obtained as a by-product from paper industry, which may have potential as an amendment with macronutrients. We studied effects of LS on the interaction ... [more ▼]

Lignosulfonate (LS) is a lignin-based polymer obtained as a by-product from paper industry, which may have potential as an amendment with macronutrients. We studied effects of LS on the interaction between Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings and hypocotyl cuttings and the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch. The experiments were performed in vitro on the MMN agar medium containing Fe-LS chelate at the concentrations of 0, 5, 10 and 25 mg/L. Inoculation with P. tinctorius increased root growth of the seedlings. Fe-LS enhanced P. tinctorius induced formation of lateral roots and had a dose-dependent positive effect on the establishment of mycorrhizas on the seedlings. The growth of the fungal mycelium was improved by Fe-LS, which might cause faster and more intensive contact with the roots and, thus, better root growth and mycorrhiza formation. P. tinctorius enhanced also adventitious root formation and subsequent root growth of the hypocotyl cuttings but without any synergistic effect with Fe-LS. Our study with P. tinctorius and Scots pine in vitro indicates that a low-cost by-product Fe-LS, obtained from paper industry, may be a potential tool to improve the efficiency of fungal inoculations, thus, facilitating the early interaction between an ECM fungus and host seedling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIncreased topsoil mineral nutrient concentrations under exotic invasive plants in belgium
Vanderhoeven, SONIA ULg; Dassonville, N.; Meerts, P.

in Plant and Soil (2005), 275(1-2), 169-179

Exotic invasive plants can alter ecosystem processes. For the first time in Europe, we have analysed the impacts of exotic invasive plants on topsoil chemical properties. At eight sites invaded by five ... [more ▼]

Exotic invasive plants can alter ecosystem processes. For the first time in Europe, we have analysed the impacts of exotic invasive plants on topsoil chemical properties. At eight sites invaded by five exotic invasive species (Fallopia japonica, Heracleum mantegazzianum, Solidago gigantea, Prunus serotina and Rosa rugosa), soil mineral element composition was compared between invaded patches and adjacent, uninvaded vegetation. We found increased concentrations of exchangeable essential nutrients under the canopy of exotic invasive plants, most strikingly so for K and Mn (32% and 34% increase, respectively). This result fits in well with previous reports of enhanced N dynamics in invaded sites, partly due to higher net primary productivity in exotic invasive plants compared to native vegetation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPhylogeny
Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg; Maquet, A.

in Plant and Soil (2003), 252(1), 55-128

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFate of nitrogen fertilizer applied on two main arable crops, winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) in the loam region of Belgium.
Destain, Jean-Pierre ULg; Francois, E.; Guiot, Joseph et al

in Plant and Soil (1993, September 21), 155/156

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Decennial Control Of N-Cycle In The Belgian Ardenne Forest Ecosystems
Weissen, F.; Hambuckers, Alain ULg; Vanpraag, Hj. et al

in Plant and Soil (1990), 128(1),

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 ULg)