References of "Plant Physiology"
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See detailRoot System Markup Language: toward an unified root architecture description language
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Pound, Michael; Diener, Julien et al

in Plant Physiology (2015)

The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased over the last years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it ... [more ▼]

The number of image analysis tools supporting the extraction of architectural features of root systems has increased over the last years. These tools offer a handy set of complementary facilities, yet it is widely accepted that none of these software tool is able to extract in an efficient way growing array of static and dynamic features for different types of images and species. . We describe the Root System Markup Language (RSML) that has been designed to overcome two major challenges: (i) to enable portability of root architecture data between different software tools in an easy and interoperable manner allowing seamless collaborative work, and (ii) to provide a standard format upon which to base central repositories which will soon arise following the expanding worldwide root phenotyping effort. RSML follows the XML standard to store 2D or 3D image metadata, plant and root properties and geometries, continuous functions along individual root paths and a suite of annotations at the image, plant or root scales, at one or several time points. Plant ontologies are used to describe botanical entities that are relevant at the scale of root system architecture. An xml-schema describes the features and constraints of RSML and open-source packages have been developed in several languages (R, Excel, Java, Python, C#) to enable researchers to integrate RSML files into popular research workflow. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant Water Uptake in Drying Soils
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Couvreur, Valentin; Meunier, Félicien et al

in Plant Physiology (2014), in press

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See detailRoot Systems Biology: bridging regulatory networks to rhizosphere-scale processes
Hill, Kristine; Porco, Silvana; Lobet, Guillaume ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2013)

Our understanding of root biology has advanced over the last decade, in large part due to genetic and genomic approaches in model organisms. Recently, researchers have started to study the mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of root biology has advanced over the last decade, in large part due to genetic and genomic approaches in model organisms. Recently, researchers have started to study the mechanisms controlling root growth and development using systems biology approaches. Modeling is set to become much more important as our knowledge of root regulatory pathways becomes increasingly complex and their outputs less intuitive. In order to relate root genotype to phenotype we must move beyond the network scales and employ multiscale modeling approaches to predict emergent properties at the tissue, organ, organism and rhizosphere levels. The interplay between scales is complex and an integrative approach is essential to understand the underlying biological mechanisms. We describe examples where such approaches have been successful and conclude by discussing the merits of developing digital plant models able to span the network to population scales and interact with their environment. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma membrane localization of StREM1.3 Remorin is mediated by conformational changes in a novel C-terminal anchor and required for the restriction of PVX movement.
Perraki, Artemis; Cacas, Jean-Luc; Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2012), 160(1),

The formation of plasma membrane (PM) micro-domains plays a crucial role in the regulation of membrane signalling and trafficking. Remorins are a plant-specific family of proteins organized in six ... [more ▼]

The formation of plasma membrane (PM) micro-domains plays a crucial role in the regulation of membrane signalling and trafficking. Remorins are a plant-specific family of proteins organized in six phylogenetic groups, and Remorins of the group 1 are among the few plant proteins known to specifically associate with membrane rafts. As such, they are valuable to understand the molecular bases for PM lateral organization in plants. However, little is known about the structural determinants underlying group 1 Remorins specific association with membrane rafts. We used a structure-function approach to identify a short C-terminal anchor (RemCA) indispensable and sufficient for tight direct binding of Solanum tuberosum REMORIN 1.3 (StREM1.3) to the PM. RemCA switches from unordered to an alpha-helical structure in a non-polar environment. Protein structure modelling indicates that RemCA folds into a tight hairpin of amphipathic helices. Consistently, mutations reducing RemCA amphipathy abolished StREM1.3 PM localization. Furthermore, RemCA directly binds to biological membranes in vitro, shows higher affinity for Detergent-Insoluble Membranes (DIM) lipids, and targets YFP to DIMs in vivo. Mutations in RemCA resulting in cytoplasmic StREM1.3 localization abolish StREM1.3 function in restricting potato virus X movement. The mechanisms described here provide new insights on the control and function of lateral segregation of plant PM. [less ▲]

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See detailA Single Ancient Origin for Prototypical Serine/Arginine-Rich Splicing Factors1[W][OA]
Califice, Sophie; Baurain, Denis ULg; Hanikenne, Marc ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2012), 158(2), 546-560

Eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in pre-mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing, and have ... [more ▼]

Eukaryotic pre-mRNA splicing is a process involving a very complex RNA-protein edifice. Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play essential roles in pre-mRNA constitutive and alternative splicing, and have been suggested to be crucial in plant-specific forms of developmental regulation and environmental adaptation. Despite their functional importance, little is known about their origin and evolutionary history. SR splicing factors have a modular organization featuring at least one RRM domain and a C-terminal region enriched in Ser/Arg dipeptides. To investigate the evolution of SR proteins, we infer phylogenies for >12,000 RRM domains representing >200 broadly sampled organisms. Our analyses reveal that the RRM domain is not restricted to eukaryotes and that all prototypical SR proteins share a single ancient origin, including the plant-specific SR45 protein. Based on these findings, we propose a scenario for their diversification into four natural families, each corresponding to a main SR architecture, and a dozen subfamilies, of which we profile both sequence conservation and composition. Finally, using operational criteria for computational discovery and classification, we catalogue SR proteins in 20 model organisms, with a focus on green algae and land plants. Altogether, our study confirms the homogeneity and antiquity of SR splicing factors, while establishing robust phylogenetic relationships between animal and plant proteins, which should enable functional analyses of lesser characterized SR family members, especially in green plants. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-symbiotic hemoglobin-2 leads to an elevated energy state and to a combined increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids and total oil content when over-expressed in developing seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis plants.
Vigeolas, Hélène ULg; Huhn, D.; Geigenberger, P.

in Plant Physiology (2011)

Non-symbiotic hemoglobins are ubiquitously expressed in plants and divided into two different classes based on gene-expression pattern and oxygen binding-properties. Most of the published research has ... [more ▼]

Non-symbiotic hemoglobins are ubiquitously expressed in plants and divided into two different classes based on gene-expression pattern and oxygen binding-properties. Most of the published research has been on the function of class-1 hemoglobins. To investigate the role of class-2 hemoglobins, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated over-expressing Arabidopsis hemoglobin-2 (AHb2) under the control of a seed-specific promoter. Over-expression of AHb2 led to a 40% increase in the total fatty acid content of developing and mature seeds in three subsequent generations. This was mainly due to an increase in the poly-unsaturated C18:2 (omega-6) linoleic and C18:3 (omega-3) alpha-linolenic acids. Moreover, AHb2 over-expression led to an increase in the C18:2/C18:1 and C18:3/C18:2 ratios as well as in the C18:3 content in mol% of total fatty acids and in the unsaturation/saturation index of total seed lipids. The increase in fatty-acid content was mainly due to a stimulation of the rate of triacylglycerol synthesis which was attributable to a 3-fold higher energy state and a 2-fold higher sucrose content of the seeds. Under low external oxygen, AHb2 over-expression maintained an up to 5-fold higher energy state and prevented fermentation. This is consistent with AHb2 over-expression results in improved oxygen availability within developing seeds. In contrast to this, over-expression of class-1 hemoglobin did not lead to any significant increase in the metabolic performance of the seeds. Results provide evidence for a specific function of class-2 hemoglobin in seed oil production and in promoting the accumulation of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by facilitating oxygen supply in developing seeds. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel image-analysis toolbox enabling quantitative analysis of root system architecture
Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Pagès, L.; Draye, X.

in Plant Physiology (2011), 157(1), 29--39

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See detailDynamic Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of an Arabidopsis SR Splicing Factor: Role of the RNA-Binding Domains
Rausin, Glwadys ULg; Tillemans, Vinciane ULg; Stankovic, Nancy ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2010), 153

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a ... [more ▼]

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling properties in specific cell types. Comparison of transient ectopic- and stable tissue-specific expression highlights the advantages of both approaches for nuclear protein dynamic studies. By site-directed mutagenesis of RSZp22 RNA-binding sequences, we show that functional RNA recognition motif RNP1 and zinc-knuckle are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging also revealed that these motifs are implicated in RSZp22 molecular interactions. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the CRM1/XPO1/Exportin-1 receptor pathway but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. Moreover, our data suggest that CRM1 is a putative export receptor for mRNPs in plants. [less ▲]

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See detailThe plastidial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is critical for viable pollen development in Arabidopsis
Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales - Miñana, Borja ULg; Irles-Segura, Asunción et al

in Plant Physiology (2010), 152(4), 1830-1841

Plant metabolism is highly coordinated with development. However, an understanding of the whole picture of metabolism and its interactions with plant development is scarce. In this work, we show that the ... [more ▼]

Plant metabolism is highly coordinated with development. However, an understanding of the whole picture of metabolism and its interactions with plant development is scarce. In this work, we show that the deficiency in the plastidial glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) leads to male sterility in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Pollen from homozygous gapcp double mutant plants (gapcp1gapcp2) displayed shrunken and collapsed forms and were unable to germinate when cultured in vitro. The pollen alterations observed in gapcp1gapcp2 were attributed to a disorganized tapetum layer. Accordingly, the expression of several of the genes involved in tapetum development was down-regulated in gapcp1gapcp2. The fertility of gapcp1gapcp2 was rescued by transforming this mutant with a construct carrying the GAPCp1 cDNA under the control of its native promoter (pGAPCp1::GAPCp1c). However, the GAPCp1 or GAPCp2 cDNA under the control of the 35S promoter (p35S::GAPCp), which is poorly expressed in the tapetum, did not complement the mutant fertility. Mutant GAPCp isoforms deficient in the catalytic activity of the enzyme were unable to complement the sterile phenotype of gapcp1gapcp2, thus confirming that both the expression and catalytic activity of GAPCp in anthers are necessary for mature pollen development. A metabolomic study in flower buds indicated that the most important difference between the sterile (gapcp1gapcp2, gapcp1gapcp2-p35S::GAPCp) and the fertile (wild-type plants, gapcp1gapcp2-pGAPCp1::GAPCp1c) lines was the increase in the signaling molecule trehalose. This work corroborates the importance of plastidial glycolysis in plant metabolism and provides evidence for the crucial role of GAPCps in pollen development. It additionally brings new insights into the complex interactions between metabolism and development. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists. [less ▲]

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See detailPlastidial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency leads to altered root development and affects the sugar and amino acid balance in Arabidopsis
Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales - Miñana, Borja ULg; Mulet, Juan M. et al

in Plant Physiology (2009), 151(2), 541-558

Glycolysis is a central metabolic pathway that, in plants, occurs in both the cytosol and the plastids. The glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the conversion of ... [more ▼]

Glycolysis is a central metabolic pathway that, in plants, occurs in both the cytosol and the plastids. The glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate with concomitant reduction of NAD+ to NADH. Both cytosolic (GAPCs)and plastidial(GAPCps)GAPDH activities have been described. However, the in vivo functions of the plastidial isoforms remain unresolved. In this work, we have identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) chloroplast/plastid-localized GAPDH isoforms (GAPCp1 and GAPCp2). gapcp double mutants display a drastic phenotype of arrested root development, dwarfism,and sterility. In spite of their low gene expression level as compared with other GAPDHs, GAPCp down-regulation leads to altered gene expression and to drastic changes in the sugar and amino acid balance of the plant. We demonstrate that GAPCps are important for the synthesis of serine in roots. Serine supplementation to the growth medium rescues root developmental arrest and restores normal levels of carbohydrates and sugar biosynthetic activities in gapcp double mutants. We provide evidence that the phosphorylated pathway of Ser biosynthesis plays an important role in supplying serine to roots. Overall, these studies provide insights into the in vivo functions of the GAPCps in plants. Our results emphasize the importance of the plastidial glycolytic pathway, and specifically of GAPCps, in plant primary metabolism. © 2009 American Society of Plant Biologists. [less ▲]

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See detailCombined metabolomic and genetic approaches reveal a link between the polyamine pathway and albumin 2 in developing pea seeds.
Vigeolas, Hélène ULg; Chinoy, Catherine; Zuther, Ellen et al

in Plant Physiology (2008), 146(1), 74-82

Several legume seed proteins that are potentially allergenic, poorly digested by farm animals, and/or have undesirable functional properties, have been described. One of these is the albumin protein in ... [more ▼]

Several legume seed proteins that are potentially allergenic, poorly digested by farm animals, and/or have undesirable functional properties, have been described. One of these is the albumin protein in pea (Pisum sativum) called PA2. A naturally occurring mutant line that lacks PA2 has been exploited in studies to determine the biological function of this nonstorage protein in seed development. The mutant, which has a small seed, a tall plant phenotype, and lacks most of the PA2-encoding genes, has been crossed with a standard cultivar, 'Birte,' which contains PA2 to give rise to a recombinant inbred (RI) population. An F(3) line carrying the mutation and having a short plant phenotype has been used to generate backcross (BC) lines with 'Birte.' Despite having a lower albumin content, seeds from the mutant parent and RI lines lacking PA2 have an equivalent or higher seed nitrogen content. Metabolite profiling of seeds revealed major differences in amino acid composition and polyamine content in the two parent lines. This was investigated further in BC lines, where the effects of differences in seed size and plant height between the two parents were eliminated. Here, differences in polyamine synthesis were maintained as was a difference in total seed protein between the BC line lacking PA2 and 'Birte.' Analysis of enzyme activities in the pathways of polyamine synthesis revealed that the differences in spermidine content were attributable to changes in the overall activities of spermidine synthase and arginine decarboxylase. Although the genes encoding spermidine synthase and PA2 both localized to the pea linkage group I, the two loci were shown not to be closely linked and to have recombined in the BC lines. A distinct locus on linkage group III contains a gene that is related to PA2 but expressed predominantly in flowers. The results provide evidence for a role of PA2 in regulating polyamine metabolism, which has important functions in development, metabolism, and stress responses in plants. [less ▲]

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See detailThree-dimensional gas exchange pathways in pome fruit characterized by synchrotron x-ray computed tomography.
Verboven, Pieter; Kerckhofs, Greet ULg; Mebatsion, Hibru Kelemu et al

in Plant physiology (2008), 147(2), 518-27

Our understanding of the gas exchange mechanisms in plant organs critically depends on insights in the three-dimensional (3-D) structural arrangement of cells and voids. Using synchrotron radiation x-ray ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of the gas exchange mechanisms in plant organs critically depends on insights in the three-dimensional (3-D) structural arrangement of cells and voids. Using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomography, we obtained for the first time high-contrast 3-D absorption images of in vivo fruit tissues of high moisture content at 1.4-microm resolution and 3-D phase contrast images of cell assemblies at a resolution as low as 0.7 microm, enabling visualization of individual cell morphology, cell walls, and entire void networks that were previously unknown. Intercellular spaces were always clear of water. The apple (Malus domestica) cortex contains considerably larger parenchyma cells and voids than pear (Pyrus communis) parenchyma. Voids in apple often are larger than the surrounding cells and some cells are not connected to void spaces. The main voids in apple stretch hundreds of micrometers but are disconnected. Voids in pear cortex tissue are always smaller than parenchyma cells, but each cell is surrounded by a tight and continuous network of voids, except near brachyssclereid groups. Vascular and dermal tissues were also measured. The visualized network architecture was consistent over different picking dates and shelf life. The differences in void fraction (5.1% for pear cortex and 23.0% for apple cortex) and in gas network architecture helps explain the ability of tissues to facilitate or impede gas exchange. Structural changes and anisotropy of tissues may eventually lead to physiological disorders. A combined tomography and internal gas analysis during growth are needed to make progress on the understanding of void formation in fruit. [less ▲]

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See detailRevisiting the involvement of SELF-PRUNING in the sympodial growth of tomato.
Thouet, Johanna ULg; Quinet, Muriel; Ormenese, Sandra ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2008), 148(1), 61-4

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See detailA major quantitative trait locus for cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis halleri colocalizes with HMA4, a gene encoding a heavy metal ATPase
Courbot, M.; Willems, G.; Motte, Patrick ULg et al

in Plant Physiology (2007), 144(2), 1052-1065

Cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be a constitutive species-level trait in Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri. Therefore, an interspecific cross was made between A. halleri and its closest nontolerant ... [more ▼]

Cadmium (Cd) tolerance seems to be a constitutive species-level trait in Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri. Therefore, an interspecific cross was made between A. halleri and its closest nontolerant interfertile relative, Arabidopsis lyrata sp. petraea, and a first-generation backcross population (BC1) was used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Cd tolerance. Three QTL were identified, which explained 43%, 24%, and 16% of the phenotypic variation in the mapping population. Heavy metal transporting ATPases4 (HMA4), encoding a predicted heavy metal ATPase, colocalized with the peak of the major QTL Cdtol-1 and was consequently further studied. HMA4 transcripts levels were higher in the roots and the shoots of A. halleri than in A. lyrata sp. petraea. Furthermore, HMA4 was also more highly expressed in all BC1 genotypes harboring the HMA4 A. halleri allele at the QTL Cdtol-1, independently of the presence of an A. halleri allele at the two other QTL. Overexpression of AhHMA4 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) supported a role of HMA4 in zinc (Zn) and Cd transport by reducing the Cd and Zn contents of the yeast cells. In epidermal tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells, AhHMA4:green fluorescent protein was clearly localized in the plasma membrane. Taken together, all available data point to the elevated expression of HMA4P(1B)-type ATPase as an efficient mechanism for improving Cd/ Zn tolerance in plants under conditions of Cd/ Zn excess by maintaining low cellular Cd2+ and Zn2+ concentrations in the cytoplasm. [less ▲]

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See detailZinc-dependent global transcriptional control, transcriptional deregulation, and higher gene copy number for genes in metal homeostasis of the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri
Talke, Ina N.; Hanikenne, Marc ULg; Krämer, Ute

in Plant Physiology (2006), 142(1), 148-167

The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hypertolerance and accumulates extraordinarily high Zn concentrations in its leaves. With these ... [more ▼]

The metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri exhibits naturally selected zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) hypertolerance and accumulates extraordinarily high Zn concentrations in its leaves. With these extreme physiological traits, A. halleri phylogenetically belongs to the sister clade of Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a combination of genome-wide cross species microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, a set of candidate genes is identified for Zn hyperaccumulation, Zn and Cd hypertolerance, and the adjustment of micronutrient homeostasis in A. halleri. Eighteen putative metal homeostasis genes are newly identified to be more highly expressed in A. halleri than in A. thaliana, and 11 previously identified candidate genes are confirmed. The encoded proteins include HMA4, known to contribute to root-shoot transport of Zn in A. thaliana. Expression of either AtHMA4 or AhHMA4 confers cellular Zn and Cd tolerance to yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Among further newly implicated proteins are IRT3 and ZIP10, which have been proposed to contribute to cytoplasmic Zn influx, and FRD3 required for iron partitioning in A. thaliana. In A. halleri, the presence of more than a single genomic copy is a hallmark of several highly expressed candidate genes with possible roles in metal hyperaccumulation and metal hypertolerance. Both A. halleri and A. thaliana exert tight regulatory control over Zn homeostasis at the transcript level. Zn hyperaccumulation in A. halleri involves enhanced partitioning of Zn from roots into shoots. The transcriptional regulation of marker genes suggests that in the steady state, A. halleri roots, but not the shoots, act as physiologically Zn deficient under conditions of moderate Zn supply. [less ▲]

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See detailThe mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation proteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii deduced from the genome sequencing project
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Gonzalez-Halphen, Diego; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian et al

in Plant Physiology (2005), 137(2), 447-459

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See detailA new substrate cycle in plants. Evidence for a high glucose-phosphate-to-glucose turnover from in vivo steady-state and pulse-labeling experiments with [13C]glucose and [14C]glucose.
Alonso, Ana Paula; Vigeolas, Hélène ULg; Raymond, Philippe et al

in Plant Physiology (2005), 138(4), 2220-32

Substrate (futile) cycling involving carbohydrate turnover has been widely reported in plant tissues, although its extent, mechanisms, and functions are not well known. In this study, two complementary ... [more ▼]

Substrate (futile) cycling involving carbohydrate turnover has been widely reported in plant tissues, although its extent, mechanisms, and functions are not well known. In this study, two complementary approaches, short and steady-state labeling experiments, were used to analyze glucose metabolism in maize (Zea mays) root tips. Unidirectional rates of synthesis for storage compounds (starch, Suc, and cell wall polysaccharides) were determined by short labeling experiments using [U-14C]glucose and compared with net synthesis fluxes to determine the rate of glucose production from these storage compounds. Steady-state labeling with [1-(13)C]glucose and [U-13C]glucose showed that the redistribution of label between carbon C-1 and C-6 in glucose is close to that in cytosolic hexose-P. These results indicate a high resynthesis flux of glucose from hexose-P that is not accounted for by glucose recycling from storage compounds, thus suggesting the occurrence of a direct glucose-P-to-glucose conversion. An enzyme assay confirmed the presence of substantial glucose-6-phosphatase activity in maize root tips. This new glucose-P-to-glucose cycle was shown to consume around 40% of the ATP generated in the cell, whereas Suc cycling consumes at most 3% to 6% of the ATP produced. The rate of glucose-P cycling differs by a factor of 3 between a maize W22 line and the hybrid maize cv Dea, and is significantly decreased by a carbohydrate starvation pretreatment. [less ▲]

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See detailEmbryo-specific reduction of ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase leads to an inhibition of starch synthesis and a delay in oil accumulation in developing seeds of oilseed rape.
Vigeolas, Hélène ULg; Mohlmann, Torsten; Martini, Norbert et al

in Plant Physiology (2004), 136(1), 2676-86

In oil-storing Brassica napus (rape) seeds, starch deposition occurs only transiently in the early stages of development, and starch is absent from mature seeds. This work investigates the influence of a ... [more ▼]

In oil-storing Brassica napus (rape) seeds, starch deposition occurs only transiently in the early stages of development, and starch is absent from mature seeds. This work investigates the influence of a reduction of ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) on storage metabolism in these seeds. To manipulate the activity of AGPase in a seed-specific manner, a cDNA encoding the small subunit of AGPase was expressed in the sense or antisense orientation under the control of an embryo-specific thioesterase promoter. Lines were selected showing an embryo-specific decrease in AGPase due to antisense and cosuppression at different stages of development. At early developmental stages (25 days after flowering), a 50% decrease in AGPase activity was accompanied by similar decreases in starch content and the rate of starch synthesis measured by injecting (14)C-Suc into seeds in planta. In parallel to inhibition of starch synthesis, the level of ADP-Glc decreased, whereas Glc 1-phosphate levels increased, providing biochemical evidence that inhibition of starch synthesis was due to repression of AGPase. At 25 days after flowering, repression of starch synthesis also led to a decrease in the rate of (14)C-Suc degradation and its further metabolism via other metabolic pathways. This was not accompanied by an increase in the levels of soluble sugars, indicating that Suc import was inhibited in parallel. Flux through glycolysis, the activities of hexokinase, and inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase, and the adenylate energy state (ATP to ADP ratio) of the transgenic seeds decreased, indicating inhibition of glycolysis and respiration compared to wild type. This was accompanied by a marked decrease in the rate of storage lipid (triacylglycerol) synthesis and in the fatty acid content of seeds. In mature seeds, glycolytic enzyme activities, metabolite levels, and ATP levels remained unchanged, and the fatty acid content was only marginally lower compared to wild type, indicating that the influence of AGPase on carbon metabolism and oil accumulation was largely compensated for in the later stages of seed development. Results indicate that AGPase exerts high control over starch synthesis at early stages of seed development where it is involved in establishing the sink activity of the embryo and the onset of oil accumulation. [less ▲]

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See detailPhloem import and storage metabolism are highly coordinated by the low oxygen concentrations within developing wheat seeds.
van Dongen, Joost T; Roeb, Gerhard W; Dautzenberg, Marco et al

in Plant Physiology (2004), 135(3), 1809-21

We studied the influence of the internal oxygen concentration in seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum) on storage metabolism and its relation to phloem import of nutrients. Wheat seeds that were developing ... [more ▼]

We studied the influence of the internal oxygen concentration in seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum) on storage metabolism and its relation to phloem import of nutrients. Wheat seeds that were developing at ambient oxygen (21%) were found to be hypoxic (2.1%). Altering the oxygen supply by decreasing or increasing the external oxygen concentration induced parallel changes in the internal oxygen tension. However, the decrease in internal concentration was proportionally less than the reduction in external oxygen. This indicates that decreasing the oxygen supply induces short-term adaptive responses to reduce oxygen consumption of the seeds. When external oxygen was decreased to 8%, internal oxygen decreased to approximately 0.5% leading to a decrease in energy production via respiration. Conversely, increasing the external oxygen concentration above ambient levels increased the oxygen content as well as the energy status of the seeds, indicating that under normal conditions the oxygen supply is strongly limiting for energy metabolism in developing wheat seeds. The intermediate metabolites of seed storage metabolism were not substantially affected when oxygen was either increased or decreased. However, at subambient external oxygen concentrations (8%) the metabolic flux of carbon into starch and protein, measured by injecting (14)C-Suc into the seeds, was reduced by 17% and 32%, respectively, whereas no significant effect was observed at superambient (40%) oxygen. The observed decrease in biosynthetic fluxes to storage compounds is suggested to be part of an adaptive response to reduce energy consumption preventing excessive oxygen consumption when oxygen supply is limited. Phloem transport toward ears exposed to low (8%) oxygen was significantly reduced within 1 h, whereas exposing ears to elevated oxygen (40%) had no significant effect. This contrasts with the situation where the distribution of assimilates has been modified by removing the lower source leaves from the plant, resulting in less assimilates transported to the ear in favor of transport to the lower parts of the plant. Under these conditions, with two strongly competing sinks, elevated oxygen (40%) did lead to a strong increase in phloem transport to the ear. The results show that sink metabolism is affected by the prevailing low oxygen concentrations in developing wheat seeds, determining the import rate of assimilates via the phloem. [less ▲]

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