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See detailDifferential cadmium and zinc distribution in relation to their physiological impact in the leaves of the accumulating Zygophyllum fabago L
LEFÈVRE, Isabelle; VOGEL‐MIKUŠ, Katarina; JEROMEL, Luka et al

in Plant, cell & environment (2014), 37(6), 1299-1320

Cadmium and zinc share many similar physiochemical properties, but their compartmentation, complexation and impact on other mineral element distribution in plant tissues may drastically differ. In this ... [more ▼]

Cadmium and zinc share many similar physiochemical properties, but their compartmentation, complexation and impact on other mineral element distribution in plant tissues may drastically differ. In this study, we address the impact of 10-μM Cd or 50-μM Zn treatment on ion distribution in leaves of a metallicolous population of the non-hyperaccumulating species Zygophyllum fabago at tissue and cell level, and the consequences on the plant response through a combined physiological, proteomic and metabolite approach. Micro-proton induced X-ray emission and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry analyses indicated hot spots of Cd concentrations in the vicinity of vascular bundles in response to Cd treatment, essentially bound to S-containing compounds as revealed by extended X-Ray absorption fine structure and non-protein thiol compounds analyses. A preferential accumulation of Zn occurred in vascular bundle and spongy mesophyll in response to Zn treatment, and was mainly bound to O/N-ligands. Leaf proteomics and physiological status evidenced a protection of photosynthetically active tissues and the maintenance of cell turgor through specific distribution and complexation of toxic ions, reallocation of some essential elements, synthesis of proteins involved in photosynthetic apparatus or C-metabolism, and metabolite synthesis, with some specificities regarding the considered heavy metal treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailN content of phloem and xylem exudates during the transition to flowering in Sinapis alba and Arabidopsis thaliana
Corbesier, Laurent; Havelange, Andrée ULg; Lejeune, Pierre et al

in Plant, Cell & Environment (2001), 24

The involvement of nitrogenous substances in the transition to flowering was investigated in Sinapis alba and Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia). Both species grown in short days (SD) are induced to flower ... [more ▼]

The involvement of nitrogenous substances in the transition to flowering was investigated in Sinapis alba and Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia). Both species grown in short days (SD) are induced to flower by one long day (LD). In S. alba, the phloem sap (leaf and apical exudates) and the xylem sap (root exudate) were analysed in LD versus SD. In A. thaliana, only the leaf exudate could be analysed but an alternative system for inducing flowering without day-length extension was used: the displaced SD (DSD). Significant results are: (i) in both species, the leaf exudate was enriched in Gln during the inductive LD, at a time compatible with export of the floral stimulus; (ii) in S. alba, the root export of amino acids decreased in LD, whereas the nitrate remained unchanged - thus the extra-Gln found in the leaf exudate should originate from the leaves; (iii) extra-Gln was also found very early in the apical exudate of S. alba in LD, together with more Glu; (iv) in A. thaliana induced by one DSD, the leaf export of Asn increased sharply, instead of Gln in LD. This agrees with Asn prevalence in C-limited plants. The putative role of amino acids in the transition to flowering is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCircadian rhythms and the induction of flowering in the long-day grass Lolium temulentum L.
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Bernier, Georges ULg; Kinet, Jean Marie

in Plant, Cell & Environment (1994), 17(6), 755-761

Plants of Lolium temulentum L. strain Ceres were grown in 8-h short day (SD) for 45 d before being exposed either to a single long day (LD) or to a single 8-h SD given during an extended dark period. For ... [more ▼]

Plants of Lolium temulentum L. strain Ceres were grown in 8-h short day (SD) for 45 d before being exposed either to a single long day (LD) or to a single 8-h SD given during an extended dark period. For LD induction, the critical photoperiod was between 12 and 14 h, and more than 16 h were needed for a maximal flowering response. During exposure to a single 24-h LD, the translocation of the floral stimulus began between the fourteenth and the sixteenth hours after the start of the light period, and was completed by the twenty-fourth hour. Full flowering was also induced by one 8-h SD beginning 4 or 28 h after the start of a 40-h dark period, i.e. by shifting 12 h forward or beyond the usual SD. The effectiveness of a so-called 'displaced short day' (DSD) was not affected by light quality and light intensity. With a mixture of incandescent and fluorescent lights at a total photosynthetic photon flux density of 400 µmol m-2 s-1, a 4-h light exposure beginning 4 h after the start of a 40-h dark period was sufficient to induce 100 flowering. The flower-inducing effect of a single 8-h DSD was also assessed during a 64-h dark period. Results revealed two maxima at a 20-h interval. This fluctuation in light sensitivity suggests that a circadian rhythm is involved in the control of flowering of L. temulentum. [less ▲]

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