References of "Personality & Individual Differences"
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See detailThe influence of encoding style on the production of false memories in the DRM paradigm: New insights on individual differences in false memory susceptibility?
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Personality & Individual Differences (2011), 50(5), 583-587

Recent research has shown that there are individual differences in how preexisting (internal) schemata (versus cues from the outside world) affect encoding processes, which can be reliably assessed with ... [more ▼]

Recent research has shown that there are individual differences in how preexisting (internal) schemata (versus cues from the outside world) affect encoding processes, which can be reliably assessed with the internal and external Encoding Style Questionnaire (ESQ, Lewicki, 2005). Since reliance on preexisting schemata at encoding has been found to increase the production of false memories in the DRM paradigm (Roediger & McDermott, 1995), while item-specific encoding has been shown to reduce it (see Gallo, 2006), it was examined whether individual differences in encoding style affects the production of such false memories. To this purpose, normal participants were asked to complete a French version of the ESQ questionnaire (Billieux et al., 2009) and were presented with a modified DRM procedure (Brédart, 2000) assessing false recall. The results showed a positive correlation between ESQ scores and false recall showing that internal encoders were more susceptible to false memories than external encoders. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociation between frontal EEG asymmetries and emotional intelligence among adults
Mikolajczak, Moïra; Bodarwé, Kerrin; Laloyaux, Olivier et al

in Personality & Individual Differences (2010), 48(2), 177-181

This study aimed at investigating the brain correlates of trait emotional intelligence. Trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) is a constellation of emotion-related traits, capturing the extent to which ... [more ▼]

This study aimed at investigating the brain correlates of trait emotional intelligence. Trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) is a constellation of emotion-related traits, capturing the extent to which people experience, attend to, identify, understand, regulate, and utilize their emotions and those of others. As previous studies have provided converging evidence that frontal asymmetries were one of the determinants of emotion dispositions and behaviors, and as observations on individuals with a high level of emotional intelligence parallel those on people with a left-sided frontal cortical asymmetry in nearly every respect, we hypothesized that the level of emotional intelligence might be associated with differential frontal activation. Results supported the hypothesis: the pattern of resting electroencephalographic (EEG) activation recorded in the frontal areas was significantly associated with emotional intelligence. Individuals with higher trait EI evidence greater resting left frontal activation. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreasing emotional intelligence: (How) is it possible?
Nelis, Delphine ULg; Quoidbach, Jordi ULg; Mikolajczak, M. et al

in Personality & Individual Differences (2009), 47(1), 36-41

The construct of emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the individual differences in the perception, processing, regulation, and utilization of emotional information. As these differences have been shown ... [more ▼]

The construct of emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the individual differences in the perception, processing, regulation, and utilization of emotional information. As these differences have been shown to have a significant impact on important life outcomes (e.g., mental and physical health, work performance and social relationships), this study investigated, using a controlled experimental design, whether it is possible to increase El. Participants of the experimental group received a brief empirically-derived El training (four group training sessions of two hours and a half) while control participants continued to live normally. Results showed a significant increase in emotion identification and emotion management abilities in the training group. Follow-up measures after 6 months revealed that these changes were persistent. No significant change was observed in the control group. These findings suggest that El can be improved and open new treatment avenues. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIf you can regulate sadness, you can probably regulate shame: Associations between trait emotional intelligence, emotion regulation and coping efficiency across discrete emotions
Mikolajczak, Moïra; Nelis, Delphine ULg; Hansenne, Michel ULg et al

in Personality & Individual Differences (2008), 44(6), 1356-1368

The construct of trait emotional intelligence [trait El] encompasses individual dispositions related to the perception, processing, regulation, and utilization of emotional information. These emotion ... [more ▼]

The construct of trait emotional intelligence [trait El] encompasses individual dispositions related to the perception, processing, regulation, and utilization of emotional information. These emotion-related dispositions are located at the lower levels of personality hierarchies. Prior studies found that trait El promoted the utilization of adaptive coping strategies to regulate stress. The present study examined (1) whether this effect would extend to other emotions and (2) whether the coping styles used to regulate a given emotion would mediate the effect of trait El on the propensity to experience that particular emotion. Analyses revealed that trait El promoted the choice of adaptive strategies not only in the case of stress, but also anger, sadness, fear, jealousy, and shame. Trait El also promoted the use of adaptive strategies to maintain joy. We also found that high trait El individuals' choice of adaptive strategies to down-regulate various negative emotions and maintain positive ones explained their decreased propensity to experience these negative emotions and their increased propensity to experience positive ones. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between Cloninger's biosocial model of personality and the behavioral inhibition/approach systems (BIS/BAS)
Mardaga, Solange; Hansenne, Michel ULg

in Personality & Individual Differences (2007), 42(4), 715-722

Novelty seeking and harm avoidance are two major temperamental dimensions from the Cloninger's biosocial model of personality that are theoretically related to Gray's behavioral approach system (BAS) and ... [more ▼]

Novelty seeking and harm avoidance are two major temperamental dimensions from the Cloninger's biosocial model of personality that are theoretically related to Gray's behavioral approach system (BAS) and behavioral inhibition system (BIS), respectively. The revised version of the temperament and character inventory (TCI-R) and the Carver and White BIS/BAS scales were developed to assess these constructs. Despite the theoretical relationships between the two models, no study investigated the associations between these scales. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the relationships between the TCI-R and the BIS/BAS scales. A total of 150 healthy participants (75 females) completed the BIS/BAS scales and the TCI-R. Results showed that harm avoidance and reward dependence were good predictors of BIS, whereas persistence and novelty seeking were good predictors of BAS, when age and gender were controlled. This study supports the theoretical links between BIS and harm avoidance, and between BAS and novelty seeking, and extends these links to other Cloninger's dimension. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPersonality traits modulate skin conductance response to emotional pictures: An investigation with Cloninger's model of personality
Mardaga, S.; Laloyaux, Olivier ULg; Hansenne, Michel ULg

in Personality & Individual Differences (2006), 40(8), 1603-1614

Several studies found strong relationships between main personality dimensions and emotions, and more particularly between neuroticism and negative emotions, as well as between extraversion and positive ... [more ▼]

Several studies found strong relationships between main personality dimensions and emotions, and more particularly between neuroticism and negative emotions, as well as between extraversion and positive ones. In these studies, personality was mainly assessed with respect to the big five model, and emotions were evaluated with subjective rating scales. To extend the exploration of the associations between personality and emotion, the aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between Cloninger's dimensions of personality and emotional reactivity assessed by skin conductance response (SCR). In 55 normal subjects, SCR was recorded while they were presented pictures selected as positive, negative and neutral from the International Affective Picture System. The results showed no influence of personality on response magnitude, but subjects with higher harm avoidance scores showed longer half-recovery times for negative relative to neutral pictures. This result is consistent with the dispositional bias of harm avoidance to respond intensely to signals of aversive stimuli. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHarm avoidance is related to mismatch negativity (MMN) amplitude in healthy subjects
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Scantamburlo, Gabrielle ULg et al

in Personality & Individual Differences (2003), 34(6), 1039-1048

Event-related potential (ERP) studies evidenced that some personality dimensions induced different controlled cognitive attitudes towards the processing of information. However, few data are available on ... [more ▼]

Event-related potential (ERP) studies evidenced that some personality dimensions induced different controlled cognitive attitudes towards the processing of information. However, few data are available on the possible relationships between personality and automatic attention or early sensory processing. In the present study the relationships between the mismatch negativity (MMN) and personality described by the Cloninger model of personality were investigated. Subjects were 32 healthy volunteers. The MMN was recorded with frequent stimuli tones of 1470 Hz, 70 dB and 40 ms duration, and target (20%) tones of 1470 Hz, 70 dB, 80 ms duration. The subjects completed a French version of the 226-item self-questionnaire TCI within the day following psychophysiological recording. The results showed that the HA dimension was negatively correlated with the MMN amplitude. The association was more present among women than men. No significant relationship existed between the other dimensions of personality and either the MMN amplitude or latency. These findings suggest that the MMN is related to the behavioral inhibition system (BIS), a fact which is consistent with clinical studies conducted on schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests that personality dimensions induce different automatic attitudes towards the processing of information. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailFurther evidence on the relationship between dopamine and novelty seeking: a neuroendocrine study
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Pitchot, William ULg et al

in Personality & Individual Differences (2002), 33(6), 967-977

In the biosocial model of Cloninger, three major personality dimensions, novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), and reward dependence (RD) are dependent on central monoaminergic systems, respectively ... [more ▼]

In the biosocial model of Cloninger, three major personality dimensions, novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), and reward dependence (RD) are dependent on central monoaminergic systems, respectively dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic. This study investigated the relationships between these major personality dimensions and growth hormone (GH) responses to both apomorphine and clonidine challenge tests in healthy subjects. GH responses to apomorphine were significantly correlated with NS when peak relative values were considered (r=0.47, P=0.03). HA and RD did not show any relationships with the endocrine responses. In contrast, no significant relationship existed between GH responses to clonidine and any of the three temperament dimensions. These results gave another support of the hypothesized link between NS and dopaminergic central neurotransmission. In contrast, the results did not confirm the association between RD and noradrenergic central neurotransmission, probably because RD is poorly validated. This partial confirmation might suggest that the link between personality traits and neurotransmission systems is probably indirect. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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