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See detailInfluence of COX-2 and OXTR polymorphisms on treatment outcome in treatment resistant depression
Mendlewicz, Julien; Crisafulli, Concetta; Calati, R et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2012)

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See detailIntensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials during light interference in migraine.
Ambrosini, Anna; Coppola, Gianluca; Gerardy, Pierre-Yves et al

in Neuroscience letters (2011), 492(2), 80-3

Migraine patients show interictally a strong intensity dependence of auditory evoked cortical potentials (IDAP) and a lack of habituation of evoked potentials. Photic drive on high-frequency flash ... [more ▼]

Migraine patients show interictally a strong intensity dependence of auditory evoked cortical potentials (IDAP) and a lack of habituation of evoked potentials. Photic drive on high-frequency flash stimulation is another well-known interictal feature in migraineurs, associated with alpha-rhythm hyper-synchronisation. We compared therefore the influence of light stimulation on IDAP in healthy volunteers (HV) and migraine patients. A continuous flash stimulation was delivered during the recording of auditory evoked potentials at suprathreshold increasing stimulation intensities. IDAP was measured as the amplitude/stimulus intensity function (ASF) slope. In HV, the ASF slope decreased during flash stimulation, whereas, on average, there was no significant change in migraineurs. A closer analysis of migraineurs disclosed two subgroups of patients with no detectable clinical differences: one, the largest, in which the ASF slope was normal at baseline, but increased during light stimulation, the other with an increased ASF slope at rest and a decrease during light interference. Visual sensory overload is able to increase IDAP in the majority of migraineurs, which contrasts with HV. We hypothesise that this could be due to hyper-synchronisation of the alpha rhythm because of photic drive and possibly thalamo-cortical dysfunction. A minority of migraineurs have, like HV, an IDAP reduction during light interference. They are, however, characterised, unlike most HV, by a high IDAP at baseline. Besides underscoring the pathophysiological heterogeneity of migraine, these results suggest that light interference might improve the phenotyping of migraine patients who have a normal IDAP in the resting condition. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interplay of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CACNA1A gene may contribute to migraine susceptibility.
D'Onofrio, Mara; Ambrosini, Anna; Di Mambro, Alessandra et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2009), 453(1), 12-5

Migraine is a common disorder with a significant genetic component. Mutations in the CACNA1A gene are found in hemiplegic migraine (HM). Basilar-type (BM), another subtype of migraine with aura, differs ... [more ▼]

Migraine is a common disorder with a significant genetic component. Mutations in the CACNA1A gene are found in hemiplegic migraine (HM). Basilar-type (BM), another subtype of migraine with aura, differs from HM only by the absence of motor deficits. BM and HM may thus share common genetic features. In the present study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CACNA1A gene were characterized in a population of migraine patients and healthy controls. The polymorphisms, E918D, predicting a glutamic acid-to-aspartic acid substitution at codon 918 and E993V, predicting a glutamic acid-to-valine substitution at codon 993, were frequently detected among patients and controls. Seven BM, 10 SHM, 5 FHM, 57 migraine with typical aura, 32 migraine without aura patients and 107 healthy controls were screened. The E918D and E993V SNPs were found in 30/117 (25.6%) and 32/117 (27.3%) migraine patients, respectively. The prevalence of these SNPs taken separately was not significantly different from that of control subjects (n=28/107, 26.2% for E918D; n=29/107 for E993V, 27.1%) neither for the total migraine population nor for the various migraine subtypes. By contrast, coexistence of both SNPs was more frequent in migraineurs (25/117, 21%) than in healthy controls (12/107, 11%; p=0.048), a difference that was significant for every migraine subtype. This result suggests that the interplay of minor genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence the P/Q-type calcium channel function in several subtypes of migraine. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of urinary odor-induced glomerular activation in the main olfactory bulb of aromatase knock-out and wild type female mice
Martel, K. L.; Keller, Matthieu ULg; Douhard, Quentin ULg et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2007), 421(2), 101-105

Previously [D.W. Wesson, M. Keller, Q. Douhard, M.J. Baum, J. Bakker, Enhanced urinary odor discrimination in female aromatase knockout mice, Horm. Behav. 49 (2006) 580-586] female aromatase knock out ... [more ▼]

Previously [D.W. Wesson, M. Keller, Q. Douhard, M.J. Baum, J. Bakker, Enhanced urinary odor discrimination in female aromatase knockout mice, Horm. Behav. 49 (2006) 580-586] female aromatase knock out mice successfully learned to discriminate in a food-motivated go/no-go task between urinary volatiles from ovariectomized female mice treated with estradiol as opposed to estradiol plus progesterone whereas wild type females failed to learn this odor discrimination. We asked whether this behavioral difference is reflected in the ability of these two types of urinary volatiles to differentially stimulate Fos expression in juxtaglomerular cells (an index of glomerular activation) of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) in wild type versus ArKO female mice. Statistically significant differences in the profiles of MOB glomerular activation were seen in ovariectomized, estrogen-treated ArKO as well as WT female subjects following exposure to urinary volatiles from ovariectomized females given estradiol alone as opposed to estradiol plus progesterone. Therefore, previously observed differences between females of the two genotypes in their behavioral responses to these odors must reflect differential processing in more central segments of the olfactory pathway instead of in the MOB. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailLimitations in transplantation of astroglia-biomatrix bridges to stimulate corticospinal axon regrowth across large spinal lesion gaps
Deumens, Ronald; Koopmans, Guido C; Honig, Wiel MM et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2006), 400(3), 208-212

Regrowth of injured axons across rather small spinal cord lesion gaps and subsequent functional recovery has been obtained after many interventions. Long-distance regeneration of injured axons across ... [more ▼]

Regrowth of injured axons across rather small spinal cord lesion gaps and subsequent functional recovery has been obtained after many interventions. Long-distance regeneration of injured axons across clinically relevant large spinal lesion gaps is relatively unexplored. Here, we aimed at stimulating long-distance regrowth of the injured corticospinal (CS) tract. During development, an oriented framework of immature astrocytes is important for correct CS axon outgrowth. Furthermore, a continuous growth promoting substrate may be needed to maintain a CS axon regrowth response across relatively large spinal lesion gaps. Hence, we acutely transplanted poly(D,L)-lactide matrices, which after seeded with immature astrocytes render aligned astrocyte-biomatrix complexes (R. Deumens, et al. Alignment of glial cells stimulates directional neurite growth of CNS neurons in vitro. Neuroscience 125 (3) (2004) 591-604), into 2-mm long dorsal hemisection lesion gaps. In order to create a growth promoting continuum, astrocyte suspensions were also injected rostral and caudal to the lesion gap. During 2 months, locomotion was continuously monitored. Histological analysis showed that astrocytes injected into host spinal tissue survived, but did not migrate. None of the astrocytes on the biomatrices survived within the lesion gap. BDA-labeled CS axons did not penetrate the graft. However, directly rostral to the lesion gap, 120.9 +/- 38.5% of the BDA-labeled CS axons were present in contrast to 12.8 +/- 3.9% in untreated control animals. The observed anatomical changes were not accompanied by locomotor improvements as analyzed with the BBB and CatWalk. We conclude that although multifactorial strategies may be needed to stimulate long-distance CS axon regrowth, future studies should focus on enhancing the viability of cell/biomatrix complexes within large spinal lesion gaps. [less ▲]

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See detailNervous system injury: focus on the inflammatory cytokine 'granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor'
Franzen, Rachelle ULg; Bouhy, D.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Neuroscience Letters (2004), 361(1-3), 76-78

Any lesion in the nervous system, be it infectious, immunopathological, ischemic or traumatic, is followed by an inflammatory process that induces rapid activation of glial cells and additional ... [more ▼]

Any lesion in the nervous system, be it infectious, immunopathological, ischemic or traumatic, is followed by an inflammatory process that induces rapid activation of glial cells and additional recruitment of granulocytes, T-cells and monocytes/macrophages from the blood stream. Neuroinflammation is a double-sided sword. It can cause neuronal damage and participate in neuropathic pain, but it also has neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects at some stages. Cytokines are the main molecular actors of this 'network of inflammation'. Among them, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pro-inflammatory hematopoietic cytokine widely used in haematological disorders to stimulate proliferation and differentiation of neutrophilic, eosinophilic and monocytic lineages. GM-CSF and its receptor are expressed in the brain and the cytokine can cross the blood-brain barrier. It is thus likely to affect various nervous system functions. This review will focus on the role of GM-CSF in nervous system disorders and their experimental models with particular emphasis on its possible beneficial effect on axonal regeneration after PNS and CNS injury. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailMotor cortex excitability in Alzheimer's disease and in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia.
Alagona, Giovanna; Ferri, Raffaele; Pennisi, Giovanni et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2004), 362(2), 95-8

Twenty Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 20 subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) patients and 20 neurologically and cognitively normal subjects underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation to ... [more ▼]

Twenty Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 20 subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) patients and 20 neurologically and cognitively normal subjects underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation to study motor cortex excitability changes. Motor threshold (MT), amplitude of motor evoked potentials, silent period and the H/M ratio (amplitude of maximal Hoffman reflex vs. that of maximal motor response) were considered. MT was lower in SIVD patients when compared with AD patients (P = 0.003) and the control group (P < 0.001) and lower in AD patients when compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The increment of motor cortex excitability in AD and SIVD did not lead us to distinguish clearly the two types of dementia. It is likely that the electrophysiological similarity between AD and SIVD could represent another common mechanism shared from these forms of dementia. [less ▲]

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See detailVagus nerve stimulation attenuates heat- and formalin-induced pain in rats
Bohotin, C.; Scholsem, M.; Bohotin, V. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2003), 351(2), 79-82

The analgesic effect of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has not yet been demonstrated in animals with the devices used in the clinic. We studied in awake rats the effects of two VNS protocols on the hind ... [more ▼]

The analgesic effect of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has not yet been demonstrated in animals with the devices used in the clinic. We studied in awake rats the effects of two VNS protocols on the hind paw hot water test and compared the results with those previously obtained in the oro-facial formalin test. A stringent duty cycle (20 s on/18 s off) increased heat pain tolerance in both hind paws (average 188%) after 2 h of stimulation. VNS with parameters used in epilepsy (30 s on/5 min off) decreased heat tolerance after 2 h, but produced a significant antinociceptive effect after days of stimulation. VNS may thus be useful in pain disorders, even with the less stringent protocol. (C) 2003 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailMinimal effects of JL 13, a pyridobenzoxazepine derivative with an antipsychotic potential, on circulating prolactin levels in male rats
Liégeois, Jean-François ULg; Bruhwyler, J.; Hendrick, J. C. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2002), 319(1), 49-52

Antipsychotic therapy is frequently associated with several side effects such as hyperprolactinemia. The influence of a putative antipsychotic JL 13 on prolactin release was assessed after intraperitoneal ... [more ▼]

Antipsychotic therapy is frequently associated with several side effects such as hyperprolactinemia. The influence of a putative antipsychotic JL 13 on prolactin release was assessed after intraperitoneal injection in gentled male rats in comparison with clozapine and haloperidol. A total of 30 or 150 min after administration, whole blood was collected for preparing serum samples. Prolactin was quantified by radioimmunoassay method. At 30 min, JL 13 like clozapine, increased prolactin concentration only at the higher dose (30 mg/kg) while haloperidol at both tested doses induced a dramatic increase of prolactin concentration. At 150 min after injection, only haloperidol (0.3 mg/kg) significantly increased serum prolactin level. This minimal effect on prolactinemia reinforces the similarity of clozapine and JL 13 regarding the atypical antipsychotic profile. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailReduced gating of middle-latency auditory evoked potentials (P50) in migraine patients: another indication of abnormal sensory processing?
Ambrosini, A.; De Pasqua, Victor ULg; Afra, J. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2001), 306(1-2), 132-4

Habituation of cortical evoked responses to repetitive stimuli is reduced in migraine between attacks. To explore another aspect of information processing, we measured auditory sensory gating. The ... [more ▼]

Habituation of cortical evoked responses to repetitive stimuli is reduced in migraine between attacks. To explore another aspect of information processing, we measured auditory sensory gating. The amplitude of the P50 response to the second of two homologous stimuli was significantly less reduced in migraineurs than in healthy volunteers. This lack of auditory sensory gating may be due to a hypofunction of monoaminergic subcortico-cortical pathways, which is also supposed to cause the interictal deficit of cortical habituation to repetitive stimuli. [less ▲]

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See detailImpairment of neuromuscular transmission in a subgroup of migraine patients
Ambrosini, Anna; MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULg; Alagona, Giovanna et al

in Neuroscience Letters (1999), 276(3), 201-3

Neuronal voltage-dependent P/Q Ca2+ channels are genetically abnormal in many cases of familial hemiplegic migraine and possibly associated with the more common forms of migraine with and without aura ... [more ▼]

Neuronal voltage-dependent P/Q Ca2+ channels are genetically abnormal in many cases of familial hemiplegic migraine and possibly associated with the more common forms of migraine with and without aura. Besides the brain, these channels are found in motor nerve endings where they control stimulation-induced acetylcholine release. Using single fiber EMG recordings we were able to demonstrate subclinical abnormalities of neuromuscular transmission in a subgroup of patients suffering from migraine with aura. This could be related to genetic abnormalities of P/Q Ca2+ channels in certain patients suffering from migraine with aura, which needs to be explored by proper genetic analyses. [less ▲]

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See detailThe basic pattern of activation in motor and sensory temporal tasks: positron emission tomography data
Lejeune, Helga ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Bonnet, Michel et al

in Neuroscience Letters (1997), 235(1-2), 21-24

Positron emission tomography (PET) data were obtained from subjects performing a synchronization task (target duration 2700 ms). A conjunction analysis was run to identify areas prominently activated both ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) data were obtained from subjects performing a synchronization task (target duration 2700 ms). A conjunction analysis was run to identify areas prominently activated both in this task and in a temporal generalization task (target duration 700 ms) used previously. The common pattern of activation included the right prefrontal, inferior parietal and anterior cingulate cortex, the left putamen and the left cerebellar hemisphere. These areas are assumed to play a major role in time processing, in relation to attention and memory mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailBicuculline methiodide potentiates NMDA-dependent burst firing in rat dopamine neurons by blocking apamin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ currents.
Johnson, S. W.; Seutin, Vincent ULg

in Neuroscience Letters (1997), 231(1), 13-6

Apamin, a bee venom toxin which blocks a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, potentiates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced burst firing in dopamine neurons. We now report that burst firing is also potentiated by ... [more ▼]

Apamin, a bee venom toxin which blocks a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, potentiates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced burst firing in dopamine neurons. We now report that burst firing is also potentiated by an apamin-like effect of bicuculline methiodide (BMI) at the same concentration (30 microM) which blocks GABA(A) receptors in vitro. Using microelectrodes to record intracellularly from rat dopamine neurons in the midbrain slice, BMI reduced the apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization in all cells tested. BMI also mimicked apamin (100 nM) by potentiating burst firing produced by a concentration of NMDA (10 microM) which is too low to evoke burst firing when perfused alone. When recording under voltage-clamp, both BMI and apamin reduced a depolarization-activated outward current which was also sensitive to perfusate containing no-added Ca2+. Although picrotoxin (100 microM) and bicuculline free base (30 microM) blocked the inhibition of firing produced by the GABA(A) agonist isoguvacine (100 microM), neither had apamin-like effects. We conclude that BMI potentiates burst firing by blocking an apamin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ current. [less ▲]

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See detailGrafts of Syngenic Cultured, Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion-Derived Schwann Cells to the Injured Spinal Cord of Adult Rats: Preliminary Morphological Studies
Martin, Didier ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Delree, P. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (1991), 124(1), 44-8

Highly enriched cultures of Schwann cells were obtained from adult rat dorsal root ganglia and implanted (5 x 10(5) -9 x 10(5) cells) in the spinal cord of syngenic adult rats at the site of an acute ... [more ▼]

Highly enriched cultures of Schwann cells were obtained from adult rat dorsal root ganglia and implanted (5 x 10(5) -9 x 10(5) cells) in the spinal cord of syngenic adult rats at the site of an acute compression lesion produced by a subdural inflatable microballoon. These autografts survived and invaded the host tissue, reducing central cavitation and astrocytic gliosis. They dramatically promoted ingrowth of axons, the majority of which appeared to come from the dorsal roots as judged by their neuropeptide content. Invasion of the transplants by descending, e.g. aminergic fibers, was negligible at survival times of up to 4 months. Nonetheless, autologous Schwann cells, which are readily available in the host, represent a promising material for grafts into the injured spinal cord. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Vitro Kinetics of a Newborn Rat Astroglia-Derived Neuronotoxic Activity
Leprince, Pierre ULg; rigo, Jean-Michel; Lefebvre, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuroscience Letters (1989), 102(2-3), 268-72

A low-molecular weight astrocyte-derived neuronotoxic activity (ANTA) was detected, using a colorimetric bioassay of cell survival, by its effect on cultured granule cells. This neuronotoxic activity was ... [more ▼]

A low-molecular weight astrocyte-derived neuronotoxic activity (ANTA) was detected, using a colorimetric bioassay of cell survival, by its effect on cultured granule cells. This neuronotoxic activity was found to be released rapidly from newborn rat astrocytes in culture upon incubation in 50 mM K+-containing growth medium. The release by astrocytes could be induced repetitively by successive incubations in high-K+ medium alternating with incubations in normal medium. Astrocytes were also found to inactivate rapidly isobutanol-extracted ANTA in normal K+-containing growth medium. Kinetic studies showed that ANTA induces a slow (greater than 12 h) degeneration of cultured granule cells. ANTA is shown here to be an intermediate of normal astrocyte metabolism and to display appropriate kinetic characteristics compatible with its proposed role in inducing part of the delayed neuronal loss that occurs after a brain injury (secondary neuronal death). [less ▲]

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See detailBrain basic fibroblast growth factor stimulates the release of plasminogen activators by newborn rat cultured astroglial cells
Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Pettmann, B. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (1988), 91(3), 321-326

Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a growth factor for many cell types including newborn rat astroglial cells, stimulates in a dose-dependent fashion the release of plasminogen activators (PAs) by ... [more ▼]

Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a growth factor for many cell types including newborn rat astroglial cells, stimulates in a dose-dependent fashion the release of plasminogen activators (PAs) by these cells as measured by the fibrin-overlay method or the Coleman and Green's colorimetric assay. This effect of bFGF on PAs secretion (about 4.5-fold increase at 40 ng/ml bFGF) does not result from an aspecific stimulation of protein secretion by astrocytes and is only partly correlated with the mitogenic activity of bFGF. bFGF was also tested on two clonal glioma cell lines (C6 and LN18). Only one of those cell types (LN18) showed a stimulated PA release in the presence of bFGF. These data are discussed with respect to the putative roles of plasminogen activators in the developing nervous system. [less ▲]

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See detailA sexually dimorphic nucleus in the quail preoptic area.
Viglietti-Panzica, C.; Panzica, G. C.; Fiori, M. G. et al

in Neuroscience Letters (1986), 64(2), 129-34

The cytoarchitectural analysis of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic region of the Japanese quail reveals a sexual dimorphism in the total volume of the medial preoptic nucleus (significantly larger in ... [more ▼]

The cytoarchitectural analysis of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic region of the Japanese quail reveals a sexual dimorphism in the total volume of the medial preoptic nucleus (significantly larger in males than in females). Different nuclei of the region (dorsal preopticus, suprachiasmaticus) do not show any statistically significant difference. The sex-related difference is more consistent comparing the distribution of dark volume. This last is due to a larger number of cells containing high amount of Nissl's substance in male than in female. Present findings represent the first example of sexual dimorphism in the avian hypothalamus. [less ▲]

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See detailPotassium effect on Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity of cultured newborn rat astroblasts during differentiation.
Moonen, Gustave ULg; FRANCK, G.

in Neuroscience Letters (1977), 4(5), 263-7

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