References of "Neuropsychological Rehabilitation"
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See detailA grid for a precise analysis of daily activities
Wojtasik, Vinciane ULg; Olivier, Catherine ULg; Lekeu, Françoise ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2010), 20

Assessment of daily living activities is essential in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Most current tools quantitatively assess overall ability but provide little qualitative information on individual ... [more ▼]

Assessment of daily living activities is essential in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Most current tools quantitatively assess overall ability but provide little qualitative information on individual difficulties. Only a few tools allow therapists to evaluate stereotyped activities and record different types of errors. We capitalised on the Kitchen Activity Assessment to design a widely applicable analysis grid that provides both qualitative and quantitative data on activity performance. A cooking activity was videotaped in 15 patients with dementia and assessed according to the different steps in the execution of the task. The evaluations obtained with our grid showed good correlations between raters, between versions of the grid and between sessions. Moreover, the degree of independence obtained with our analysis of the task correlated with the Kitchen Activity Assessment score and with a global score of cognitive functioning. We conclude that assessment of a daily living activity with this analysis grid is reproducible and relatively independent of the therapist, and thus provides quantitative and qualitative information useful for both evaluating and caring for demented patients. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive rehabilitation of the updating sub-component of working memory in schizophrenia: a case study.
Levaux, Marie-Noëlle ULg; Vezzaro, J.; Laroi, Frank ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2009), 19(2), 244-73

Working memory problems have been identified as a core cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. In this paper, we present the results of a cognitive rehabilitation programme (Duval & Coyette, 2005 ... [more ▼]

Working memory problems have been identified as a core cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. In this paper, we present the results of a cognitive rehabilitation programme (Duval & Coyette, 2005) administered to a schizophrenia patient, and specifically designed to improve the updating sub-component of working memory. The original feature of this programme was that it involved two types of updating exercises: cognitive and ecological. The purpose was to enable the patient to acquire cognitive strategies that alleviate the mental load of the central executive and to transfer them to daily life. The specificity and efficacy of the programme were assessed with multiple (cognitive, ecological and non-target) baseline measurements. In addition, several questionnaires were administered to assess the effect of the programme on subjective cognitive complaints affecting daily life, psychiatric symptoms and self-esteem. The results demonstrated the efficacy of the rehabilitation programme on the updating function and the generalisation of these beneficial effects to daily life. A significant decrease in both subjective cognitive complaints and psychiatric symptoms was also observed. However, the patient's self-esteem did not improve. [less ▲]

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See detailFace-name association learning in early Alzheimer's disease: a comparison of learning methods and their underlying mechanisms.
Bier, Nathalie; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Gagnon, Lise et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2008), 18(3), 343-71

This study compared the efficacy of five learning methods in the acquisition of face-name associations in early dementia of Alzheimer type (AD). The contribution of error production and implicit memory to ... [more ▼]

This study compared the efficacy of five learning methods in the acquisition of face-name associations in early dementia of Alzheimer type (AD). The contribution of error production and implicit memory to the efficacy of each method was also examined. Fifteen participants with early AD and 15 matched controls were exposed to five learning methods: spaced retrieval, vanishing cues, errorless, and two trial-and-error methods, one with explicit and one with implicit memory task instructions. Under each method, participants had to learn a list of five face-name associations, followed by free recall, cued recall and recognition. Delayed recall was also assessed. For AD, results showed that all methods were efficient but there were no significant differences between them. The number of errors produced during the learning phases varied between the five methods but did not influence learning. There were no significant differences between implicit and explicit memory task instructions on test performances. For the control group, there were no differences between the five methods. Finally, no significant correlations were found between the performance of the AD participants in free recall and their cognitive profile, but generally, the best performers had better remaining episodic memory. Also, case study analyses showed that spaced retrieval was the method for which the greatest number of participants (four) obtained results as good as the controls. This study suggests that the five methods are effective for new learning of face-name associations in AD. It appears that early AD patients can learn, even in the context of error production and explicit memory conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailNew learning in dementia: transfer and spontaneous use of learning in everyday life functioning. Two case studies.
Bier, Nathalie; Provencher, Veronique; Gagnon, Lise et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2008), 18(2), 204-35

The purpose of these two case studies was to explore the effectiveness of learning methods in dementia when applied in real-life settings and the integration of new skills in daily life functioning. The ... [more ▼]

The purpose of these two case studies was to explore the effectiveness of learning methods in dementia when applied in real-life settings and the integration of new skills in daily life functioning. The first participant, DD, learned to look at a calendar with the spaced retrieval method to answer his repeated questions about the current date and calls made to family. Progressive cuing was used by his wife to increase spontaneous use of the calendar, but DD had difficulty integrating the calendar into his routine. The second patient, MD, relearned a leisure activity (listening to music on a cassette radio) and how to participate in a social activity (saying the rosary in a group) with a combination of learning methods. Transfer of these skills in similar contexts was difficult for MD. She never integrated the cassette radio into her daily life routine but she went regularly to the rosary activity, which was cued by an alarm clock. In sum, the learning methods used were very effective with these patients but transfer and spontaneous use were difficult. Since these aspects are essential to rehabilitation, they should be further explored in order to increase the effectiveness of cognitive interventions. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in severely brain injured patients: Differences between VS and MCS
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2005), 15(3-4, Jul-Sep), 283-289

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS ... [more ▼]

We review cerebral processing of auditory and noxious stimuli in minimally conscious state (MCS) and vegetative state (VS) patients. In contrast with limited brain activation found in VS patients, MCS patients show activation similar to controls in response to auditory, emotional and noxious stimuli. Despite an apparent clinical similarity between MCS and VS patients, functional imaging data show striking differences in cortical segregation and integration between these two conditions. However, in the absence of a generally accepted neural correlate of consciousness as measured by functional neuroirnaging, clinical assessment remains the gold standard for the evaluation and management of severely brain damaged patients. [less ▲]

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See detailThe cognitive management of daily life activities in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease me in a day care centre : A case report
Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Juillerat, Anne- Claude et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2000), 10(5), 485-509

The day care centre appears to be a structure especially well suited for the management of mild to moderate Alzheimer patients. It constitutes a place in which performance in everyday life activities can ... [more ▼]

The day care centre appears to be a structure especially well suited for the management of mild to moderate Alzheimer patients. It constitutes a place in which performance in everyday life activities can be explored, and optimisation strategies can be installed before they are used at home. Another objective of the day care centre might also be to provide caregivers with support and ease the burden that the daily care of a demented patient represents. Finally, it may also help to alleviate the patient's loneliness. In this perspective, we describe the general organisation of the recently-created day care centre at the University Hospital of Liege. We also present the assessment and intervention programme which was conducted in this day care centre in order to reduce the generalised apathy and depressed mood observed in a 70-year-old Alzheimer patient (AM). This programme aimed at restoring a leisure activity (knitting) at home by proposing several adaptations designed to minimise the impact of AM's cognitive deficits on knitting activity. While an aggravation of her memory deficits was observed, the intervention significantly decreased AM's apathy and depressed mood as well as her husband's burden. [less ▲]

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