References of "Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation"
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See detailEuropean Renal Best Practice Guideline on kidney donor and recipient evaluation and perioperative care
Abramowicz, Daniel; Cochat, Pierre; Claas, Frans H.J et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2014)

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See detailCan we use circulating biomarkers to monitor bone turnover in CKD haemodialysis patients? Hypotheses and facts
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2014), 29(5), 997-1004

Assessing bone turnover is a key diagnostic tool in the global management of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Since bone biopsy is invasive and cannot be repeated in clinical ... [more ▼]

Assessing bone turnover is a key diagnostic tool in the global management of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Since bone biopsy is invasive and cannot be repeated in clinical practice and because bone histomorphometry is less available due to the lack of specialized laboratories, we will focus on potential biomarkers used to assess and monitor bone turnover. After briefly reviewing the pathophysiology of bone turnover in CKD and haemodialysis patients, we will focus on the strengths and limitations of the now recommended biomarkers, i.e. parathormone and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase. We will consider the clinical and also the biological aspects of the topic and also insist on the use of these biomarkers for the monitoring, and the follow-up of the turnover in haemodialysis subjects. Finally, we will discuss some of the most promising, but still not recommended, emerging biomarkers. [less ▲]

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See detailCan we use circulating biomarkers to monitor bone turnover in CKD haemodialysis patients? Hypotheses and facts
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2014), 29(5), 997-1004

Assessing bone turnover is a key diagnostic tool in the global management of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Since bone biopsy is invasive and cannot be repeated in clinical ... [more ▼]

Assessing bone turnover is a key diagnostic tool in the global management of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Since bone biopsy is invasive and cannot be repeated in clinical practice and because bone histomorphometry is less available due to the lack of specialized laboratories, we will focus on potential biomarkers used to assess and monitor bone turnover. After briefly reviewing the pathophysiology of bone turnover in CKD and haemodialysis patients, we will focus on the strengths and limitations of the now recommended biomarkers, i.e. parathormone and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase. We will consider the clinical and also the biological aspects of the topic and also insist on the use of these biomarkers for the monitoring, and the follow-up of the turnover in haemodialysis subjects. Finally, we will discuss some of the most promising, but still not recommended, emerging biomarkers. [less ▲]

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See detailMesenchymal stromal cell therapy in conditions of renal ischaemia/reperfusion.
Erpicum, Pauline; Detry, Olivier; Weekers, Laurent et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2014)

Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a worldwide public health issue of increasing incidence, with a significant morbi-mortality. AKI treatment mostly relies on supportive manoeuvres in the absence of ... [more ▼]

Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a worldwide public health issue of increasing incidence, with a significant morbi-mortality. AKI treatment mostly relies on supportive manoeuvres in the absence of specific target-oriented therapy. The pathophysiology of AKI commonly involves ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) events, which cause both immune and metabolic consequences in renal tissue. Similarly, at the time of kidney transplantation (KT), I/R is an unavoidable event which contributes to early graft dysfunction and enhanced graft immunogenicity. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent a heterogeneous population of adult, fibroblast-like multi-potent cells characterized by their ability to differentiate into tissues of mesodermal lineages. Because MSC have demonstrated immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties, MSC administration at the time of I/R and/or at later times has been hypothesized to attenuate AKI severity and to accelerate the regeneration process. Furthermore, MSC in KT could help prevent both I/R injury and acute rejection, thereby increasing graft function and survival. In this review, summarizing the encouraging observations in animal models and in pilot clinical trials, we outline the benefit of MSC therapy in AKI and KT, and envisage their putative role in renal ischaemic conditioning. [less ▲]

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See detailModification of diet in renal disease versus chronic kidney disease epidemiology collaboration equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate in obese patients
BOUQUEGNEAU, Antoine ULg; Vidal-Petiot, Emanuelle; Vrtovsnik, François et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2013), 28(4), 122-130

Background Obesity is a recognized risk factor for both the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Accurate estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is thus important in these ... [more ▼]

Background Obesity is a recognized risk factor for both the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Accurate estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is thus important in these patients. We tested the performances of two creatinine-based GFR estimates, the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations, in an obese population. Methods Patients with body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m2 were included. The reference method for measured GFR (mGFR) was 51Cr-EDTA (single-injection method, two blood samples at 120 and 240 min). Both indexed and non-indexed results were considered. Serum creatinine was measured using the IDMS-traceable compensated Jaffe method. Mean bias (eGFR–mGFR), precision (SD around the bias) and accuracy within 30% (percentage of estimations within 30% of mGFR) were calculated for both equations. Results The population included 366 patients (185 women) from two different areas. Mean age was 55 ± 14 years, and mean BMI was 36 ± 7 kg/m2. Mean mGFR was 56 ± 26 mL/min/1.73 m2 (71 ± 35 mL/min without indexation). In the total population, mean bias was +1.9 ± 14.3 and +4.6 ± 14.7 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P < 0.05), and accuracy 30% was 80 and 76% for the MDRD and CKD-EPI equations (P < 0.05), respectively. In patients with mGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, mean bias was +4.6 ± 18.4 and +9.3 ± 17.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P < 0.05), and accuracy 30% was 81 and 79% (NS) for the MDRD and CKD-EPI equations, respectively. Conclusions The CKD-EPI equation did not outperform the MDRD study equation in this population of obese patients [less ▲]

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See detailCholecaciferol in haemodialysis patients: a randomized, double-blind, proof-of-concept and safety study
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; WARLING, Xavier et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2013), 28(7), 1779-1786

Background. The role of cholecalciferol supplementation in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients has been questioned. The objective of this randomized double-blinded study is to assess whether ... [more ▼]

Background. The role of cholecalciferol supplementation in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients has been questioned. The objective of this randomized double-blinded study is to assess whether cholecalciferol therapy can increase serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels in haemodialysed patients and the safety implications of this therapy on certain biological parameters and vascular calcifications score. Methods. Forty-three haemodialysis patients were randomized to receive placebo or cholecalciferol (25 000 IU) therapy every 2 weeks. The biological parameters, serum calcium, phosphorus, 25(OH)D and parathormone (PTH) levels, were monitored monthly for 12 consecutive months. Vascular calcifications were assessed by lateral X-ray radiography. Results. At baseline, the mean serum 25(OH)D levels were low and similar in both groups. Thirty patients (16 treated and 14 placebo) completed the study: 11 patients died (5 placebo and 6 treated), 1 patient dropped out and 1 patient was transplanted (both from the placebo group). After 1 year, the percentage of 25(OH)D deficient patients was significantly lower in the treated group. None of the patients developed hypercalcaemia. The PTH levels tended to increase over the study period under placebo and to decrease in the cholecalciferol group. The median changes in PTH levels from baseline to 1 year were statistically different between the two groups [+80 (−58 to 153) and −115 (−192 to 81) under placebo and cholecalciferol treatment, respectively, P = 0.02].The calcification scores increased equivalently in both groups (+2.3 per year). Conclusions. Cholecalciferol is effective and safe, and does not negatively affect calcium, phosphorus, PTH levels and vascular calcifications. Additional studies are needed to compare the impacts of nutritional and active vitamin D agents on vascular calcification and mortality. [less ▲]

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See detailCon: Should we abandon the use of the MDRD equation in favour of the CKD-EPI equation?
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; Pottel, Hans; Botev, Rossini

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2013), 28(6), 1396-1403

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See detailMDRD VERSUS CKD-EPI EQUATIONS TO ESTIMATE GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE IN OBESE PATIENTS
BOUQUEGNEAU, Antoine ULg; CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2013, April 18), 28(supplément 1), 117-139

Introduction and Aims: Obesity is recognized as a risk factor both for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is thus especially ... [more ▼]

Introduction and Aims: Obesity is recognized as a risk factor both for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is thus especially important to follow these patients. We have tested the performances of two creatinine-based equations, namely the MDRD and CKD-EPI equations, in an obese population. Conclusions :Both in the global and subgroup analyses, the CKD-EPI equation did not outperform the MDRD study equation. The performances of both equations were worse in CKD patients. These two conclusions were still valid if indexed GFR was considered. [less ▲]

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See detailPurpose and scope
Abramowucz, Daniel; Cochat, Pierre; Claas, Frans et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2013), 28

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See detailPeritoneal equilibration test with conventional ‘low pH/high glucose degradation product’ or with biocompatible ‘normal pH/low glucose degradation product’ dialysates: does it matter?
VAN OVERMEIRE, Lionel ULg; Goffin, Eric; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2013)

Abstract Background. The evaluation of the peritoneal transport characteristics is mandatory in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. This is usually performed in routine clinical practice with a peritoneal ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background. The evaluation of the peritoneal transport characteristics is mandatory in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. This is usually performed in routine clinical practice with a peritoneal equilibration test (PET) using conventional dialysates, with low pH and high glucose degradation product (GDP) concentrations. An increasing proportion of patients are now treated with biocompatible dialysates, i.e. with physiological pH and lower GDP concentrations. This questions the appropriateness to perform a PET with conventional solutions in those patients. The aim of our study is to compare the results of the PET using biocompatible and conventional dialysates, respectively. Methods. Nineteen stable PD patients (13 males, 6 females; mean age: 67.95 ± 2.36 years, mean body surface area: 1.83 ± 0.04 m2, dialysis vintage: 2.95 ± 0.19 years) were included, among which 10 were usually treated with biocompatible and 9 with conventional solutions. Two PETs were performed, within a 2-week interval, in each patient. PET sequence (conventional solution first or biocompatible solution first) was randomized in order to avoid ‘time bias’. Small (urea, creatinine and glucose), middle (beta-2-microglobulin) and large molecules’ (albumin and alpha-2-macroglobulin) dialysate/plasma (D/P) concentration ratios and clearances were measured during each PET. Ultrafiltration (UF) and sodium filtration were also recorded. Results of both tests were compared by the Wilcoxon paired test. Results. No statistical difference was found between both dialysates for small molecule transport rates or for sodium filtration and UF. However, a few patients were not similarly classified for small-solute transport characteristics within the PET categories. Beta-2-microglobulin and albumin D/P ratios at different time points of the PET were significantly higher with the biocompatible, when compared with the conventional, solutions: 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.08 ± 0.02 (P < 0.01) and 0.008 ± 0.003 versus 0.007 ± 0.003 (P = 0.01), respectively. A similar difference was also observed for beta-2-microglobulin that was higher with biocompatible dialysates (1.04 ± 0.32 versus 0.93 ± 0.32 mL/min, respectively). Conclusion. Peritoneal transport of water and small solutes is independent of the type of dialysate which is used. This is not the case for the transport of beta-2-microglobulin and albumin that is higher under biocompatible dialysates. Vascular tonus modification could potentially explain such differences. The PET should therefore always be carried out with the same dialysate to make longitudinal comparisons possible. [less ▲]

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See detailNormal reference values for glomerular filtration rate: what do we really know?
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; Schaeffner, E; Ebert, N et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27(7), 2664-72

In nephrology, chronic kidney disease is defined by both proteinuria and measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This article focuses on GFR and different ways to define its normal reference ... [more ▼]

In nephrology, chronic kidney disease is defined by both proteinuria and measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This article focuses on GFR and different ways to define its normal reference values. In this context, we compare two perspectives: first the reference values defined by measuring GFR in normal individuals (the 'classical way') and secondly a fixed cut-off value at 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) according to the associated mortality risk (the 'prognostic way'). Following the classical way, we can assert that normal GFR values are largely over 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in healthy subjects, at least before the age of 70 years. However, we know that GFR physiologically decreases with age, and in adults older than 70 years, values below 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) could be considered normal. Following the 'prognostic way', the fixed cut-off of 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) has been retained in the K-DIGO guidelines. However, we challenge this concept and the fact that the variable 'age' is poorly taken into account in these data. There is an obvious discrepancy between the reference values defined either by the 'classical way' or by the 'prognostic way' which we think could be largely reduced, if age was better taken into consideration in these definitions. [less ▲]

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See detailOutcome of the living kidney donor
DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; DUBOIS, Bernard ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27(1), 41-50

Renal transplantation from living kidney donors is still relatively marginal in most of the European countries. However, this source of kidney grafts may help to overcome in part the organ donor shortage ... [more ▼]

Renal transplantation from living kidney donors is still relatively marginal in most of the European countries. However, this source of kidney grafts may help to overcome in part the organ donor shortage of cadaveric donors. The living donor strategy implies correct and objective information about donation risks and completely free acceptance of the living candidate of the donation. In this paper, we reviewed the consequences of kidney donation on the living donor health, considering very short term (linked to the surgery), short term (effect of nephrectomy on glomerular filtration rate) and long term (risk of mortality, chronic kidney disease, proteinuria and hypertension) consequences of kidney donation. [less ▲]

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See detailInterpretation of serum PTH concentrations with different kits in dialysis patients according to the KDIGO guidelines: importance of the reference (normal) values
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; DELANAYE, Pierre ULg; VRANKEN, Laura ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27

Background. The recommended target range for serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) in dialysis patients has changed from 150 to 300 pg/mL in the KDOQI guidelines to two to nine times the upper normal limit in ... [more ▼]

Background. The recommended target range for serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) in dialysis patients has changed from 150 to 300 pg/mL in the KDOQI guidelines to two to nine times the upper normal limit in the KDIGO ones. Although inclusion/exclusion criteria for the reference population are highly important, they are usually not mentioned in the commercial kits. In this study, we used the same reference population of vitamin D-replete normal subjects to establish reference values for 10 commercial PTH kits. We evaluated whether this may improve the classification of dialysis patients according to the KDIGO compared to the use of reference values proposed by the manufacturers. Methods. We measured serum PTH with 10 different kits in 149 haemodialysis patients, and 240 25-OH-vitamin D-replete (>75 nmol/L) individuals with an estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results. For the 10 kits, our upper normal limit was lower than those of the manufacturers. The difference was, however, variable from one kit to another. The two kits that yielded the lowest and the highest absolute concentrations classified differently 84/149 patients (56.4%) according to the KDOQI and 53/149 (36.2%) according to the KDIGO using the manufacturers’ normal value.Using our normal values significantly decreased the discrepancies with 24/149 patients (16.1%) being still classified differently. Taking the measurement uncertainty into consideration, 8% of the patients only remained differently classified by these two kits. Conclusions. Using the same vitamin-D-replete population to establish the reference range for 10 commercial PTH kits significantly improved the classification of haemodialysis patients according to the KDIGO target range. [less ▲]

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See detailDiagnosis of cyst infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: attributes and limitations of the current modalities.
JOURET, François ULg; Lhommel, Renaud; Devuyst, Olivier et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27(10), 3746-51

Cyst infection is a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) because of the lack of specific manifestations and limitations of conventional imaging ... [more ▼]

Cyst infection is a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) because of the lack of specific manifestations and limitations of conventional imaging procedures. Still, recent clinical observations and series have highlighted common criteria for this condition. Cyst infection is diagnosed if confirmed by cyst fluid analysis showing bacteria and neutrophils, and as a probable diagnosis if all four of the following criteria are concomitantly met: temperature of >38 degrees C for >3 days, loin or liver tenderness, C-reactive protein plasma level of >5 mg/dL and no evidence for intracystic bleeding on computed tomography (CT). In addition, the elevation of serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) has been proposed as a biomarker for hepatic cyst infection. Positron-emission tomography after intravenous injection of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose, combined with CT, proved superior to radiological imaging techniques for the identification and localization of kidney and liver pyocyst. This review summarizes the attributes and limitations of these recent clinical, biological and imaging advances in the diagnosis of cyst infection in patients with ADPKD. [less ▲]

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See detailMachine perfusion versus cold storage for the preservation of kidneys from donors ≥ years allocated in the Eurotransplant Senior Programme
GALLINAT, Anja; MOERS, Cyril; TRECKMANN, Jürgen et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27

Background. In the Eurotransplant Senior Programme (ESP), kidneys from donors aged ≥65 years are preferentially allocated locally and transplanted into patients aged ≥65 years on dialysis. The purpose of ... [more ▼]

Background. In the Eurotransplant Senior Programme (ESP), kidneys from donors aged ≥65 years are preferentially allocated locally and transplanted into patients aged ≥65 years on dialysis. The purpose of this study was to analyse whether the results of transplantation in the ESP can be improved by preservation of organs by hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) compared with simple cold storage (CS). Methods. Overall, 85 deceased heart-beating donors ≥65 years of age were included in this analysis with follow-up until 1 year post-transplant. For each donor, one kidney was randomly assigned to preservation by CS and the contralateral kidney to MP from organ procurement until transplantation. Delayed graft function (DGF), primary non-function (PNF) and 1-year patient and graft survival rates were evaluated as primary and secondary endpoints. Results. The median recipient age was 66 years in both groups and the median cold ischaemia time was 11 h for MP and 10.5 h for CS (P = 0.69). The DGF rate was 29.4% for MP and 34.1% for CS (P = 0.58). Only extended duration of cold ischaemia time was an independent risk factor for the development of DGF (odds ratio 1.2, P < 0.0001). PNF was significantly reduced (3.5% MP versus 12.9% CS, P = 0.02). The 1-year patient and graft survival rates were similar for MP and CS (94% versus 95% and 89 versus 81%, P > 0.05). The 1-year graft survival rate was significantly improved after MP in recipients who developed DGF (84% MP versus 48% CS, P = 0.01). Conclusions. Continuous pulsatile hypothermic MP for kidneys from donors aged ≥65 years can reduce the rate of never-functioning kidneys and improve the 1-year graft survival rate of kidneys with DGF. In this small cohort, the known advantage of MP for the reduction of DGF could not be confirmed, possibly due to relatively short cold ischaemia times. [less ▲]

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See detailCystatin C in HIV-infected patients: promising but not yet ready for prime time.
Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Mariat, Christophe; DELANAYE, Pierre ULg

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2012), 27(4), 1305-1313

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See detailGlomerular and proximal tubule cysts as early manifestations of Pkd1 deletion.
Ahrabi, Ali K.; JOURET, François ULg; Marbaix, Etienne et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2010), 25(4), 1067-78

BACKGROUND: The homozygous deletion of Pkd1 in the mouse results in embryonic lethality with renal cysts and hydrops fetalis, but there is no precise data on the segmental origin of cysts and potential ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The homozygous deletion of Pkd1 in the mouse results in embryonic lethality with renal cysts and hydrops fetalis, but there is no precise data on the segmental origin of cysts and potential changes associated with polyhydramnios. METHODS: We used Pkd1-null mice to investigate cystogenesis and analyze the amniotic fluid composition from embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) to birth (n = 257 embryos). RESULTS: Polyhydramnios was consistently observed from E13.5 in Pkd1(-/-) embryos, in absence of placental abnormalities but with a significantly higher excretion of sodium and glucose from E13.5 through E16.5, and increased cyclic adenosine 3'5-monophosphate (cAMP) levels at E14.5 and E15.5. The Pkd1(-/-) embryos started to die at E13.5, with lethality peaking at E15.5, corresponding to the onset of cystogenesis. The first cysts in Pkd1(-/-) kidneys emerged at E15.5 in mesenchyme-derived segments at the cortico-medullary junction, with a majority of glomerular cysts and fewer proximal tubule cysts (positive for megalin). The cysts extended to ureteric bud-derived collecting ducts (positive for Dolichos biflorus agglutinin lectin) from E16.5. CONCLUSIONS: These studies indicate that Pkd1 deletion is associated with a massive loss of solutes (from E13.5) and increased cAMP levels (E14.5) associated with polyhydramnios. These abnormalities precede renal cysts (E15.5), first derived from glomeruli and proximal tubules and later from the collecting ducts, reflecting the expression pattern of Pkd1 in maturing epithelial cells. [less ▲]

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