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See detailInduction of the Alternative NF-{kappa}B Pathway by Lymphotoxin {alpha}{beta} (LT{alpha}{beta}) Relies on Internalization of LT{beta} Receptor
Ganeff, Corine; Remouchamps, Caroline ULg; Boutaffala, Layla et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2011), 21

Several tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family members activate both the classical and the alternative NF-κB pathways. However, how a single receptor engages these two distinct pathways is still ... [more ▼]

Several tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family members activate both the classical and the alternative NF-κB pathways. However, how a single receptor engages these two distinct pathways is still poorly understood. Using lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) as a prototype, we showed that activation of the alternative, but not the classical, NF-κB pathway relied on internalization of the receptor. Further molecular analyses revealed a specific cytosolic region of LTβR essential for its internalization, TRAF3 recruitment, and p100 processing. Interestingly, we found that dynamin-dependent, but clathrin-independent, internalization of LTβR appeared to be required for the activation of the alternative, but not the classical, NF-κB pathway. In vivo, ligand-induced internalization of LTβR in mesenteric lymph node stromal cells correlated with induction of alternative NF-κB target genes. Thus, our data shed light on LTβR cellular trafficking as a process required for specific biological functions of NF-κB. [less ▲]

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See detailThe repressing function of the oncoprotein BCL-3 requires CtBP while its polyubiquitination and degradation involve the E3 ligase TBLR1
Keutgens, Aurore ULg; Shostak, Kateryna ULg; Close, Pierre ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2010), 30

The nuclear and oncogenic BCL-3 protein activates or represses gene transcription when bound to NF-kB proteins p50 and p52, yet the molecules that specifically interact with BCL-3 and drive BCL-3-mediated ... [more ▼]

The nuclear and oncogenic BCL-3 protein activates or represses gene transcription when bound to NF-kB proteins p50 and p52, yet the molecules that specifically interact with BCL-3 and drive BCL-3-mediated effects on gene expression remain largely uncharacterized. Moreover, GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of BCL-3 triggers its degradation through the proteasome, but the proteins involved in this degradative pathway are poorly characterized. Biochemical purification of interacting partners of BCL-3 led to the identification of CtBP as a molecule required for the ability of BCL-3 to repress gene transcription. CtBP is also required for the oncogenic potential of BCL-3 and for its ability to inhibit UV-mediated cell apoptosis in keratinocytes. We also defined the E3 ligase TBLR1 as a protein involved in BCL-3 degradation through a GSK3-independent pathway. Thus, our data demonstrate that the LSD1/CtBP complex is required for the repressing abilities of an oncogenic IkB protein, and they establish a functional link between the E3 ligase TBLR1 and NF-kB. [less ▲]

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See detailCell-specific interaction of retinoic acid receptors with target genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells.
Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Moutier, Emmanuel; Altobelli, Gioia et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2010), 30(1), 231-44

All-trans retinoic acid (RA) induces transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-dependent autocrine growth of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation to map 354 RA ... [more ▼]

All-trans retinoic acid (RA) induces transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-dependent autocrine growth of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation to map 354 RA receptor (RAR) binding loci in MEFs, most of which were similarly occupied by the RAR alpha and RAR gamma receptors. Only a subset of the genes associated with these loci are regulated by RA, among which are several critical components of the TGF-beta pathway. We also show RAR binding to a novel series of target genes involved in cell cycle regulation, transformation, and metastasis, suggesting new pathways by which RA may regulate proliferation and cancer. Few of the RAR binding loci contained consensus direct-repeat (DR)-type elements. The majority comprised either degenerate DRs or no identifiable DRs but anomalously spaced half sites. Furthermore, we identify 462 RAR target loci in embryonic stem (ES) cells and show that their occupancy is cell type specific. Our results also show that differences in the chromatin landscape regulate the accessibility of a subset of more than 700 identified loci to RARs, thus modulating the repertoire of target genes that can be regulated and the biological effects of RA. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of genes that function in the biogenesis and localization of small nucleolar RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Qiu, Hui; Eifert, Julia; Wacheul, Ludivine et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2008), 28(11), 3686-99

Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) orchestrate the modification and cleavage of pre-rRNA and are essential for ribosome biogenesis. Recent data suggest that after nucleoplasmic synthesis, snoRNAs transiently ... [more ▼]

Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) orchestrate the modification and cleavage of pre-rRNA and are essential for ribosome biogenesis. Recent data suggest that after nucleoplasmic synthesis, snoRNAs transiently localize to the Cajal body (in plant and animal cells) or the homologous nucleolar body (in budding yeast) for maturation and assembly into snoRNPs prior to accumulation in their primary functional site, the nucleolus. However, little is known about the trans-acting factors important for the intranuclear trafficking and nucleolar localization of snoRNAs. Here, we describe a large-scale genetic screen to identify proteins important for snoRNA transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis to visualize U3 snoRNA localization in a collection of temperature-sensitive yeast mutants. We have identified Nop4, Prp21, Tao3, Sec14, and Htl1 as proteins important for the proper localization of U3 snoRNA. Mutations in genes encoding these proteins lead to specific defects in the targeting or retention of the snoRNA to either the nucleolar body or the nucleolus. Additional characterization of the mutants revealed impairment in specific steps of U3 snoRNA processing, demonstrating that snoRNA maturation and trafficking are linked processes. [less ▲]

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See detailLipid raft targeting of hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase by protein kinase C theta-mediated phosphorylation.
Nika, Konstantina; Charvet, Celine; Williams, Scott et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2006), 26(5), 1806-16

Protein kinase C theta (PKC theta) is unique among PKC isozymes in its translocation to the center of the immune synapse in T cells and its unique downstream signaling. Here we show that the hematopoietic ... [more ▼]

Protein kinase C theta (PKC theta) is unique among PKC isozymes in its translocation to the center of the immune synapse in T cells and its unique downstream signaling. Here we show that the hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) also accumulates in the immune synapse in a PKC theta-dependent manner upon antigen recognition by T cells and is phosphorylated by PKC theta at Ser-225, which is required for lipid raft translocation. Immune synapse translocation was completely absent in antigen-specific T cells from PKC theta-/- mice. In intact T cells, HePTP-S225A enhanced T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced NFAT/AP-1 transactivation, while the acidic substitution mutant was as efficient as wild-type HePTP. We conclude that HePTP is phosphorylated in the immune synapse by PKC theta and thereby targeted to lipid rafts to temper TCR signaling. This represents a novel mechanism for the active immune synapse recruitment and activation of a phosphatase in TCR signaling. [less ▲]

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See detailNormal thyroid structure and function in rhophilin 2-deficient mice
Behrends, J.; Clement, S.; Pajak, B. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2005), 25

Rhophilin 2 is a Rho GTPase binding protein initially isolated by differential screening of a chronically thyrotropin (TSH)-stimulated dog thyroid cDNA library. In thyroid cell culture, expression of ... [more ▼]

Rhophilin 2 is a Rho GTPase binding protein initially isolated by differential screening of a chronically thyrotropin (TSH)-stimulated dog thyroid cDNA library. In thyroid cell culture, expression of rhophilin 2 mRNA and protein is enhanced following TSH stimulation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) transduction cascade. Yeast two-hybrid screening and coimmunoprecipitation have revealed that the GTP-bound form of RhoB and components of the cytoskeleton are protein partners of rhophilin 2. These results led us to suggest that rhophilin 2 could play an important role downstream of RhoB in the control of endocytosis during the thyroid secretory process which follows stimulation of the TSH/cAMP pathway. To validate this hypothesis, we generated rhophilin 2-deficient mice and analyzed their thyroid structure and function. Mice lacking rhophilin 2 develop normally, have normal life spans, and are fertile. They have no visible goiter and no obvious clinical signs of hyper- or hypothyroidism. The morphology of thyroid cells and follicles in these mice were normal, as were the different biological tests performed to investigate thyroid function. Our results indicate that rhophilin 2 does not play an essential role in thyroid physiology [less ▲]

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See detailThe small nucle(ol)ar RNA cap trimethyltransferase is required for ribosome synthesis and intact nucleolar morphology.
Colau, Geoffroy; Thiry, Marc ULg; Leduc, Vivian et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2004), 24(18), 7976-86

Nucleolar morphogenesis is a poorly defined process. Here we report that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar trimethyl guanosine synthase I (Tgs1p), which specifically selects the m(7)G cap structure ... [more ▼]

Nucleolar morphogenesis is a poorly defined process. Here we report that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar trimethyl guanosine synthase I (Tgs1p), which specifically selects the m(7)G cap structure of snRNAs and snoRNAs for m(2,2,7)G conversion, is required not only for efficient pre-mRNA splicing but also for pre-rRNA processing and small ribosomal subunit synthesis. Mutational analysis indicates that the requirement for Tgs1p in pre-mRNA splicing, but not its involvement in ribosome synthesis, is dependent upon its function in cap trimethylation. In addition, we report that cells lacking Tgs1p showed a striking and unexpected loss of nucleolar structural organization. Tgs1p is not a core component of the snoRNP proteins; however, in vitro, the protein interacts with the KKD/E domain present at the carboxyl-terminal ends of several snoRNP proteins. Strains expressing versions of the snoRNPs lacking the KKD/E domain were also defective for nucleolar morphology and showed a loss of nucleolar compaction. We propose that the transient and functional interactions of Tgs1p with the abundant snoRNPs, through presumed interactions with the KKD/E domain of the snoRNP proteins, contribute substantially to the coalescence of nucleolar components. This conclusion is compatible with a model of self-organization for nucleolar assembly. [less ▲]

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See detailDiet-induced obesity and reduced skin cancer susceptibility in matrix metalloproteinase-19 deficient mice
Pendas, A. M.; Folgueras, A. R.; LLano, E. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2004), 24(12), 5304-13

Matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP-19) is a member of the MMP family of endopeptidases that, in contrast to most MMPs, is widely expressed in human tissues under normal quiescent conditions. MMP-19 has been ... [more ▼]

Matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP-19) is a member of the MMP family of endopeptidases that, in contrast to most MMPs, is widely expressed in human tissues under normal quiescent conditions. MMP-19 has been found to be associated with ovulation and angiogenic processes and is deregulated in diverse pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. To gain further insights into the in vivo functions of this protease, we have generated mutant mice deficient in Mmp19. These mice are viable and fertile and do not display any obvious abnormalities. However, Mmp19-null mice develop a diet-induced obesity due to adipocyte hypertrophy and exhibit decreased susceptibility to skin tumors induced by chemical carcinogens. Based on these results, we suggest that this enzyme plays an in vivo role in some of the tissue remodeling events associated with adipogenesis, as well as in pathological processes such as tumor progression [less ▲]

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See detailEgr family members regulate nonlymphoid expression of Fas ligand, TRAIL, and tumor necrosis factor during immune responses.
Droin, Nathalie; Pinkoski, Mike; Dejardin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2003), 23(21), 7638-7647

The Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas pathway is crucial for homeostasis of the immune system and peripheral tolerance. Peripheral lymphocyte deletion involves FasL/Fas in at least two ways: coexpression of both Fas ... [more ▼]

The Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas pathway is crucial for homeostasis of the immune system and peripheral tolerance. Peripheral lymphocyte deletion involves FasL/Fas in at least two ways: coexpression of both Fas and its ligand on T cells, leading to activation-induced cell death, and expression of FasL by nonlymphoid cells, such as intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), that kill Fas-positive T cells. We demonstrate here that superantigen Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB) induced a dramatic upregulation of FasL, TRAIL, and TNF mRNA expression and function in IEC from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Using adoptive transfer in which CD4(+) T cells from OT-2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice were transferred into recipients, we observed an induction in IEC of FasL, TRAIL, and TNF mRNA after administration of antigen. Specific Egr-binding sites have been identified in the 5' promoter region of the FasL gene, and Egr-1, Egr-2, and Egr-3 mRNA in IEC from mice treated with SEB and from transgenic OT-2 mice after administration of antigen was upregulated. Overexpression of Egr-2 and Egr-3 induced endogenous ligand upregulation that was inhibited by overexpression of Egr-specific inhibitor Nab1. These results support a role for Egr family members in nonlymphoid expression of FasL, TRAIL, and TNF. [less ▲]

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See detailHeat shock transcription factor 2 is not essential for embryonic development, fertility, or adult cognitive and psychomotor function in mice.
McMillan, D Randy; Christians, Elisabeth; Forster, Michael et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2002), 22(22), 8005-14

Members of the heat shock factor (HSF) family are evolutionarily conserved regulators that share a highly homologous DNA-binding domain. In mammals, HSF1 is the main factor controlling the stress ... [more ▼]

Members of the heat shock factor (HSF) family are evolutionarily conserved regulators that share a highly homologous DNA-binding domain. In mammals, HSF1 is the main factor controlling the stress-inducible expression of Hsp genes while the functions of HSF2 and HSF4 are less clear. Based on its developmental profile of expression, it was hypothesized that HSF2 may play an essential role in brain and heart development, spermatogenesis, and erythroid differentiation. To directly assess this hypothesis and better understand the underlying mechanisms that require HSF2, we generated Hsf2 knockout mice. Here, we report that Hsf2(-/-) mice are viable and fertile and exhibit normal life span and behavioral functions. We conclude that HSF2, most probably because its physiological roles are integrated into a redundant network of gene regulation and function, is dispensable for normal development, fertility, and postnatal psychomotor function. [less ▲]

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See detailThe ornithine decarboxylase gene is essential for cell survival during early murine development
Pendeville-Samain, Hélène ULg; Carpino, Nick; Marine, Jean-Christophe et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2001), 21(19), 6549-58

Overexpression and inhibitor studies have suggested that the c-Myc target gene for ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the enzyme which converts ornithine to putrescine, plays an important role in diverse ... [more ▼]

Overexpression and inhibitor studies have suggested that the c-Myc target gene for ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the enzyme which converts ornithine to putrescine, plays an important role in diverse biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, transformation, and apoptosis. To explore the physiological function of ODC in mammalian development, we generated mice harboring a disrupted ODC gene. ODC-heterozygous mice were viable, normal, and fertile. Although zygotic ODC is expressed throughout the embryo prior to implantation, loss of ODC did not block normal development to the blastocyst stage. Embryonic day E3.5 ODC-deficient embryos were capable of uterine implantation and induced maternal decidualization yet failed to develop substantially thereafter. Surprisingly, analysis of ODC-deficient blastocysts suggests that loss of ODC does not affect cell growth per se but rather is required for survival of the pluripotent cells of the inner cell mass. Therefore, ODC plays an essential role in murine development, and proper homeostasis of polyamine pools appears to be required for cell survival prior to gastrulation. [less ▲]

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See detailHemorrhage, impaired hematopoiesis, and lethality in mouse embryos carrying a targeted disruption of the Fli1 transcription factor.
Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Pharr, Pamela N.; Lavenburg, Kim R. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2000), 20(15), 5643-5652

The Ets family of transcription factors have been suggested to function as key regulators of hematopoeisis. Here we describe aberrant hematopoeisis and hemorrhaging in mouse embryos homozygous for a ... [more ▼]

The Ets family of transcription factors have been suggested to function as key regulators of hematopoeisis. Here we describe aberrant hematopoeisis and hemorrhaging in mouse embryos homozygous for a targeted disruption in the Ets family member, Fli1. Mutant embryos are found to hemorrhage from the dorsal aorta to the lumen of the neural tube and ventricles of the brain (hematorrhachis) on embryonic day 11.0 (E11.0) and are dead by E12.5. Histological examinations and in situ hybridization reveal disorganization of columnar epithelium and the presence of hematomas within the neuroepithelium and disruption of the basement membrane lying between this and mesenchymal tissues, both of which express Fli1 at the time of hemorrhaging. Livers from mutant embryos contain few pronormoblasts and basophilic normoblasts and have drastically reduced numbers of colony forming cells. These defects occur with complete penetrance of phenotype regardless of the genetic background (inbred B6, hybrid 129/B6, or outbred CD1) or the targeted embryonic stem cell line used for the generation of knockout lines. Taken together, these results provide in vivo evidence for the role of Fli1 in the regulation of hematopoiesis and hemostasis. [less ▲]

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See detailReactive Oxygen Intermediate-Dependent Nf-Kappab Activation by Interleukin-1beta Requires 5-Lipoxygenase or Nadph Oxidase Activity
Bonizzi, Giuseppina; Piette, Jacques ULg; Haterte, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1999), 19(3), 1950-60

We previously reported that the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) in NF-kappaB activation by proinflammatory cytokines was cell specific. However, the sources for ROIs in various cell types are ... [more ▼]

We previously reported that the role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) in NF-kappaB activation by proinflammatory cytokines was cell specific. However, the sources for ROIs in various cell types are yet to be determined and might include 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and NADPH oxidase. 5-LOX and 5-LOX activating protein (FLAP) are coexpressed in lymphoid cells but not in monocytic or epithelial cells. Stimulation of lymphoid cells with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) led to ROI production and NF-kappaB activation, which could both be blocked by antioxidants or FLAP inhibitors, confirming that 5-LOX was the source of ROIs and was required for NF-kappaB activation in these cells. IL-1beta stimulation of epithelial cells did not generate any ROIs and NF-kappaB induction was not influenced by 5-LOX inhibitors. However, reintroduction of a functional 5-LOX system in these cells allowed ROI production and 5-LOX-dependent NF-kappaB activation. In monocytic cells, IL-1beta treatment led to a production of ROIs which is independent of the 5-LOX enzyme but requires the NADPH oxidase activity. This pathway involves the Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases, two enzymes which are not required for NF-kappaB activation by IL-1beta in epithelial cells. In conclusion, three different cell-specific pathways lead to NF-kappaB activation by IL-1beta: a pathway dependent on ROI production by 5-LOX in lymphoid cells, an ROI- and 5-LOX-independent pathway in epithelial cells, and a pathway requiring ROI production by NADPH oxidase in monocytic cells. [less ▲]

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See detailA single editing event is a prerequisite for efficient processing of potato mitochondrial phenylalanine tRNA
MarechalDrouard, L.; Cosset, A.; Remacle, Claire ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1996), 16(7), 3504-3510

In bean, potato, and Oenothera plants, the C encoded at position 4 (C-4) in the mitochondrial tRNA(GAA)(Phe) gene is converted into a U in the mature tRNA, This nucleotide change corrects a mismatched C-4 ... [more ▼]

In bean, potato, and Oenothera plants, the C encoded at position 4 (C-4) in the mitochondrial tRNA(GAA)(Phe) gene is converted into a U in the mature tRNA, This nucleotide change corrects a mismatched C-4-A(69) base pair which appears when the gene sequence is folded into the cloverleaf structure. C-to-U conversions constitute the most common editing events occurring in plant mitochondrial mRNAs. While most of these conversions introduce changes in the amino acids specified by the mRNA and appear to be essential for the synthesis of functional proteins in plant mitochondria, the putative role of mitochondrial tRNA editing has not yet been defined. Since the edited form of the tRNA has the correct secondary and tertiary structures compared with the nonedited form, the two main processes which might be affected by a nucleotide conversion are aminoacylation and maturation. To test these possibilities, we determined the aminoacylation properties of unedited and edited potato mitochondrial tRNA(Phe) in vitro transcripts, as well as the processing efficiency of in vitro-synthesized potato mitochondrial tRNA(Phe) precursors. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of natural precursors followed by cDNA sequencing was also used to investigate the influence of editing on processing. Our results show that C-to-U conversion at position 4 in the potato mitochondrial tRNA(GAA)(Phe) is not required for aminoacylation,vith phenylalanine but is likely to be essential for efficient processing of this tRNA. [less ▲]

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See detailThe pancreatic islet factor STF-1 binds cooperatively with Pbx to a regulatory element in the somatostatin promoter: importance of the FPWMK motif and of the homeodomain.
Peers, Bernard ULg; Sharma, S.; Johnson, T. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1995), 15(12), 7091-7

A number of homeodomain proteins have been shown to regulate cellular development by stimulating the transcription of specific target genes. In contrast to their distinct activities in vivo, however, most ... [more ▼]

A number of homeodomain proteins have been shown to regulate cellular development by stimulating the transcription of specific target genes. In contrast to their distinct activities in vivo, however, most homeodomain proteins bind indiscriminately to potential target sites in vitro, suggesting the involvement of cofactors which specify target site selection. One such cofactor, termed extradenticle, has been shown to influence segmental morphogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster by binding cooperatively with certain homeodomain proteins to target regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that STF-1, an orphan homeodomain protein required for pancreatic development in mammals, binds cooperatively to DNA with Pbx, the mammalian homolog of extradenticle. Cooperative binding with Pbx requires a pentapeptide motif (FPWMK) which is well conserved among a large subset of homeodomain proteins. The FPMWK motif is not sufficient to confer Pbx cooperativity on other homeodomain proteins, however; the N-terminal arm of the STF-1 homeodomain is also essential. As cooperative binding with Pbx occurs on only a subset of potential STF-1 target sites, our results suggest that Pbx may specify target gene selection in the developing pancreas by forming heterodimeric complexes with STF-1. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of a single strong tissue-specific enhancer downstream from the three human genes encoding placental lactogen
Jacquemin, Patrick; Oury, Cécile ULg; Peers, Bernard ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1994), 14(1), 93-103

The human genes coding for growth hormone (hGH) and placental lactogen (choriosomatomammotropic hormone [hCS]) are clustered on chromosome 17 in the following order: 5' hGH-N hCS-L hCS-A hGH-V hCS-B 3 ... [more ▼]

The human genes coding for growth hormone (hGH) and placental lactogen (choriosomatomammotropic hormone [hCS]) are clustered on chromosome 17 in the following order: 5' hGH-N hCS-L hCS-A hGH-V hCS-B 3'. So far, a single placenta-specific enhancer has been identified in the locus, 2 kb downstream from the hCS-B gene, and shown to comprise one in vitro binding site for a nuclear protein. We here provide evidence that the hCS-B enhancer is more complex: (i) protection against DNase I digestion in the 3' flanking region of the hCS-B gene reveals four binding sites (DF-1, DF-2, DF-3, and DF-4) for nuclear proteins from either placental or HeLa cells, and (ii) placenta-specific enhancer activity can be fully exerted in transient expression experiments by a 126-bp fragment comprising the DF-3 and DF-4 protein-binding sites. By dissecting this region, we show that enhancer activity is mediated by a synergy between DF-3 and DF-4. Competitions with various oligonucleotides in footprinting and gel retardation experiments indicate that the same protein or set of proteins, different in HeLa and placenta cell nuclei, interacts with sites DF-2, DF-3, and DF-4. We also studied the regions of the hCS-L and hCS-A genes which are highly similar to the hCS-B enhancer. Although they each present the same four protein-binding sites, they exhibit only minor enhancer activity. [less ▲]

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See detailRetinoic acid induction of major histocompatibility complex class I genes in NTera-2 embryonal carcinoma cells involves induction of NF-kappa B (p50-p65) and retinoic acid receptor beta-retinoid X receptor beta heterodimers.
Segars, J. H.; Nagata, T.; Bours, Vincent ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1993), 13(10), 6157-69

Retinoic acid (RA) treatment of human embryonal carcinoma (EC) NTera-2 (NT2) cells induces expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and beta-2 microglobulin surface molecules. We found ... [more ▼]

Retinoic acid (RA) treatment of human embryonal carcinoma (EC) NTera-2 (NT2) cells induces expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and beta-2 microglobulin surface molecules. We found that this induction was accompanied by increased levels of MHC class I mRNA, which was attributable to the activation of the two conserved upstream enhancers, region I (NF-kappa B like) and region II. This activation coincided with the induction of nuclear factor binding activities specific for the two enhancers. Region I binding activity was not present in undifferentiated NT2 cells, but binding of an NF-kappa B heterodimer, p50-p65, was induced following RA treatment. The p50-p65 heterodimer was produced as a result of de novo induction of p50 and p65 mRNAs. Region II binding activity was present in undifferentiated cells at low levels but was greatly augmented by RA treatment because of activation of a nuclear hormone receptor heterodimer composed of the retinoid X receptor (RXR beta) and the RA receptor (RAR beta). The RXR beta-RAR beta heterodimer also bound RA responsive elements present in other genes which are likely to be involved in RA triggering of EC cell differentiation. Furthermore, transfection of p50 and p65 into undifferentiated NT2 cells synergistically activated region I-dependent MHC class I reporter activity. A similar increase in MHC class I reporter activity was demonstrated by cotransfection of RXR beta and RAR beta. These data show that following RA treatment, heterodimers of two transcription factor families are induced to bind to the MHC enhancers, which at least partly accounts for RA induction of MHC class I expression in NT2 EC cells. [less ▲]

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See detailRelB, a new Rel family transcription activator that can interact with p50-NF-kappa B.
Ryseck, R. P.; Bull, P.; Takamiya, M. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1992), 12(2), 674-84

We have identified a serum-inducible gene, relB, which encodes a protein of 558 amino acids containing a region with high similarity to c-Rel and other members of the Rel family. Transcriptional ... [more ▼]

We have identified a serum-inducible gene, relB, which encodes a protein of 558 amino acids containing a region with high similarity to c-Rel and other members of the Rel family. Transcriptional activation analysis of GAL4-RelB fusion proteins in yeast cells reveals that RelB contains in its C-terminal 180 amino acids a transcriptional activation domain. The N-terminal part including the region of similarity with the Rel family shows no detectable transcriptional activity. RelB does not bind with high affinity to NF-kappa B sites, but heterodimers between RelB and p50-NF-kappa B do bind to different NF-kappa B-binding sites with a similar affinity to that shown by p50-NF-kappa B homodimers. However, RelB/p50-NF-kappa B heterodimers, in contrast to p50-NF-kappa B homodimers, transactivate transcription of a promoter containing a kappa B-binding site. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel mitogen-inducible gene product related to p50/p105-NF-kappa B participates in transactivation through a kappa B site.
Bours, Vincent ULg; Burd, P. R.; Brown, K. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1992), 12(2), 685-95

A Rel-related, mitogen-inducible, kappa B-binding protein has been cloned as an immediate-early activation gene of human peripheral blood T cells. The cDNA has an open reading frame of 900 amino acids ... [more ▼]

A Rel-related, mitogen-inducible, kappa B-binding protein has been cloned as an immediate-early activation gene of human peripheral blood T cells. The cDNA has an open reading frame of 900 amino acids capable of encoding a 97-kDa protein. This protein is most similar to the 105-kDa precursor polypeptide of p50-NF-kappa B. Like the 105-kDa precursor, it contains an amino-terminal Rel-related domain of about 300 amino acids and a carboxy-terminal domain containing six full cell cycle or ankyrin repeats. In vitro-translated proteins, truncated downstream of the Rel domain and excluding the repeats, bind kappa B sites. We refer to the kappa B-binding, truncated protein as p50B by analogy with p50-NF-kappa B and to the full-length protein as p97. p50B is able to form heteromeric kappa B-binding complexes with RelB, as well as with p65 and p50, the two subunits of NF-kappa B. Transient-transfection experiments in embryonal carcinoma cells demonstrate a functional cooperation between p50B and RelB or p65 in transactivation of a reporter plasmid dependent on a kappa B site. The data imply the existence of a complex family of NF-kappa B-like transcription factors. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscriptional regulation by triiodothyronine requires synergistic action of the thyroid receptor with another trans-acting factor
Voz, Marianne ULg; Peers, Bernard ULg; Wiedig, Murielle J et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (1992), 12(9), 3991-7

Human placental lactogen B (hCS-B) promoter activity is strongly stimulated by triiodothyronine (T3) in pituitary GC cells through interaction between the thyroid receptor and a thyroid receptor-binding ... [more ▼]

Human placental lactogen B (hCS-B) promoter activity is strongly stimulated by triiodothyronine (T3) in pituitary GC cells through interaction between the thyroid receptor and a thyroid receptor-binding element (TBE) spanning coordinates -67 to -41. This TBE is adjacent to the binding site for pituitary factor GHF1 (-95 to -68) which seems necessary for T3 stimulation of hCS-B promoter activity (M. L. Voz, B. Peers, A. Belayew, and J. A. Martial, J. Biol. Chem. 266:13397-13404, 1991). We here demonstrate actual synergy between the thyroid receptor and GHF1. Indeed, in placental JEG-3 cells devoid of factor GHF1, hCS promoter activity is barely stimulated by T3, while a strong response is observed in pituitary GC cells. In the latter, furthermore, neither the TBE nor the GHF1-binding site alone is sufficient to render the thymidine kinase promoter responsive to T3, while in combination they promote strong T3 stimulation. Close proximity between these sites is required for optimal synergy: T3 stimulation globally decreases with increased spacing. Furthermore, synergy occurs not only with a GHF1-binding site but also with all other factor recognition sequences tested (Sp1, NF1, CP1, Oct1, and CACCC boxes) and even with two other copies of the TBE. Nor is it specific to hCS TBE, since the palindromic sequence TCAGGTCA TGACCTGA (TREpal) also exhibits cooperativity. [less ▲]

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