References of "Microgravity Science and Technology"
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See detailEvaporation Rates and Bénard-Marangoni Supercriticality Levels for Liquid Layers Under an Inert Gas Flow
Machrafi, Hatim ULg; Sadoun, Nacer; Rednikov, Alexey et al

in Microgravity Science and Technology (2013)

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See detailProtein crystallisation under microgravity conditions: What did we learn on TIM crystallisation from the Soyuz missions?
MAES, D.; DECANNIERE, K.; ZEGERS, I. et al

in Microgravity Science and Technology (2007), XIX(5/6), 90-94

The protein Triose Phosphate Isomerase from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermotoga maritima was crystallised on board of the International Space Station in the framework of the Soyuz missions. In this ... [more ▼]

The protein Triose Phosphate Isomerase from the hyperthermophilic organism Thermotoga maritima was crystallised on board of the International Space Station in the framework of the Soyuz missions. In this paper we report on the scientific results obtained during these flights. Firstly it qas shown that different crystal forms for the same protein in the same crystallisation conditions, what is presumably due to a change in the rate at which supersaturation is achieved. Secondly, the X-ray qualité of the crystals grown in the ISS is superior to their ground control crystals. Mimicking microgravity on ground, by adding a small amourt of gel to avoid convection, also results in an improvement of X-ray quality. Nevertheless our analysis shows that the crystals obtained in this gelled ground environment are of inferior quality as compared to their space homologues. Finally we observed movement of crystals grown in the International Space Station, not only because of g-jitters but also due to residual accelerations. This has an important effect on concentration gradients of precipiants and therefore on the solubility of the protein. [less ▲]

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See detailSignaling through Rho GTPases in microgravity (Rho signaling) on ISS (Soyuz TMA-1) Belgian Soyuz Mission "Odissea"
Nusgens, Betty ULg; Lambert, Charles ULg; Lapière, ChM

in Microgravity Science and Technology (2007), XIX(5-6),

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See detailBubble rupture in a vibrated liquid under microgravity
Yoshikawa, Harunori; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam; Caps, Hervé ULg et al

in Microgravity Science and Technology (2007), 19

The response of an air bubble surrounded by a liquid in a sealed cell submitted to vibrations was investigated experimentally under microgravity conditions and compared to experiments under normal gravity ... [more ▼]

The response of an air bubble surrounded by a liquid in a sealed cell submitted to vibrations was investigated experimentally under microgravity conditions and compared to experiments under normal gravity conditions. As in normal gravity [1], it was observed that the bubble split into smaller parts when the acceleration of the vibrations reached a threshold. This threshold in microgravity is substantially smaller than that in normal gravity. Experimental results will be presented in terms of an acceleration based Bond number which has been found to characterize the bubble behaviour in the laboratory experiments [1]. Introduction [less ▲]

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See detailCounterdiffusion protein crystallisation in microgravity and its observation with PromISS (Protein Microscope for the International Space Station)
Zegers, Ingrid; Carotenuto, Luigi; Evrard, Christine ULg et al

in Microgravity Science and Technology (2006), XVIII

The crystallisation by counterdiffusion is a very efficient technique for obtaining high-quality protein crystals. A prerequisite for the use of counterdiffusion techniques is that mass transport must be ... [more ▼]

The crystallisation by counterdiffusion is a very efficient technique for obtaining high-quality protein crystals. A prerequisite for the use of counterdiffusion techniques is that mass transport must be controlled by diffusion alone. Sedimentation and convection can be avoided by either working in gelled systems, working in systems of small dimensions, or in the absence of gravity. We present the results from experiments performed on the ISS using the Protein Microscope for the International Space Station (PromISS), using digital holography to visualise crystal growth processes. We extensively characterised three model proteins for these experiments (cablys3*lysozyme, triose phosphate isomerase, and parvalbumin) and used these to assess the ISS as an environment for crystallisation by counterdiffusion. The possibility to visualise growth and movement of crystals in different types of experiments (capillary counterdiffusion and batch-type) is important, as movement of crystals is clearly not negligible. [less ▲]

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