References of "Microbial Pathogenesis"
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See detailClostridium difficile infection: Early history, diagnosis and molecular strain typing methods.
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Van Broeck, Johan; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

in Microbial Pathogenesis (2016), 97

Recognised as the leading cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains high despite efforts to improve prevention and reduce the ... [more ▼]

Recognised as the leading cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains high despite efforts to improve prevention and reduce the spread of the bacterium in healthcare settings. In the last decade, many studies have focused on the epidemiology and rapid diagnosis of CDI. In addition, different typing methods have been developed for epidemiological studies. This review explores the history of C. difficile and the current scope of the infection. The variety of available laboratory tests for CDI diagnosis and strain typing methods are also examined. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium difficile infection and intestinal microbiota interactions
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Van Broeck, Johan et al

in Microbial Pathogenesis (2015), 89

Clostridium difficile remains the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. Aside from nosocomial C. difficile infection, the bacterium is also ... [more ▼]

Clostridium difficile remains the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. Aside from nosocomial C. difficile infection, the bacterium is also increasingly important as a community pathogen. Furthermore, asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile in neonates, adults and animals is also well recognised. The investigation of the gut's microbial communities, in both healthy subjects and patients suffering C. difficile infection (CDI), provides findings and information relevant for developing new successful approaches for its treatment, such as faecal microbiota transplantation, or for the prophylaxis of the infection by modification of the gut microbiota using functional foods and beverages. The analysis of all available data shows new insights into the role of intestinal microbiota in health and disease. [less ▲]

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See detailMannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin-induced cytolysis of caprine (Capra hircus) leukocytes is mediated by the CD18 subunit of beta2-integrins
Fett, Thomas ULg; Zecchinon, Laurent ULg; Vanden Bergh, Philippe ULg et al

in Microbial Pathogenesis (2008), 45

Mannheimiosis is the major respiratory disease among some ruminants, whereas it is not pathogenic for other mammals, an observation that has been attributed to a specific interaction between Mannheimia ... [more ▼]

Mannheimiosis is the major respiratory disease among some ruminants, whereas it is not pathogenic for other mammals, an observation that has been attributed to a specific interaction between Mannheimia haemolytica leukotoxin (Lkt) and bovine or ovine CD18 subunit of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and Mac-1. We therefore hypothesized that Lkt utilizes CD18 as its receptor on caprine leukocytes as well. We have transiently transfected the b2-integrins-deficient K-562 cell line with cDNAs encoding caprine CD11a and caprine CD18 to determine the susceptibility of the transfectants to Lktinduced cytolysis. Flow cytometric analysis of the transfectants revealed surface expression of caprine LFA-1 and lysis by Lkt in a concentration-dependent manner whereas the parent cells were not. Moreover, K562 cells expressing caprine CD18 and human or bovine CD11a were also sensitive to Lkt whereas K-562 cells expressing caprine CD11a and human CD18 were not. Taken together, these results indicate that CD18 on caprine leukocytes serves as a receptor for Lkt. [less ▲]

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See detailAdherence of Mycoplasma bovis to bovine bronchial epithelial cells
Thomas, Anne; Sachse, K.; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Microbial Pathogenesis (2003), 34(3), 141-148

Mycoplasma bovis is responsible for considerable economic losses in cattle due to pneumonia, arthritis and mastitis. As the agent was shown to be capable of adhering to neutrophils and embryonic bovine ... [more ▼]

Mycoplasma bovis is responsible for considerable economic losses in cattle due to pneumonia, arthritis and mastitis. As the agent was shown to be capable of adhering to neutrophils and embryonic bovine lung (EBL) cells and invading the respiratory epithelium it is highly desirable to improve our understanding of cytadherence processes. Although several surface proteins likely to be directly involved in this initial stage of interaction between pathogen and host cells have been identified, these findings mainly referred to type strain PG45 adhering to the continuous EBL cell line. The present study provides new and complementary data about cytadherence of M. bovis based on adherence of various radiolabeled strains to a primary culture of bovine bronchial epithelial (BBE) cells using a standardized adherence assay. M. bovis was shown to adhere specifically to the primary culture of BBE cells. Inhibition of adherence was observed upon addition of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), trypsin treatment of mycoplasmas, and competition with non-radiolabeled mycoplasma cells. Interestingly, three MAbs against proteins involved in adherence to EBL cells failed to inhibit significantly the adherence to BBE cells. On the other hand, significant reduction of adherence rates by MAbs 2A8 and 9F1 directed against epitopes of variable surface lipoproteins VspC and VspF, respectively, demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in adherence of M. bovis to primary culture of BBE cells. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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