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See detailFrom taboo to commodity: history and current situation of cavy culture in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Maass; Metre, TK; Tsongo, F et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2014), 26

For the first time, the status of cavy culture in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is reviewed with emphasis on Sud-Kivu province. Cavy culture, as discussed in this paper, is the raising ... [more ▼]

For the first time, the status of cavy culture in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is reviewed with emphasis on Sud-Kivu province. Cavy culture, as discussed in this paper, is the raising, production and utilization of the domestic cavy (i.e., Guinea pig, Cavia porcellus) for consumption. Many sources were used in the review, but published scientific research literature is extremely scarce. Nevertheless, it can be estimated that more than 2 million cavies are kept in DRC, contributing significantly to nutrition security, especially animal protein, and income generation of some hundreds of thousands of poor rural and urban households. The largest cavy populations are in the Kivu provinces, which is probably partly due to the inclusion of cavies in ‘rehabilitation kits’ of humanitarian NGOs and in the agricultural portfolio of development agencies who seek to address the challenges of widespread hunger and malnutrition in the area. The review covers the history of cavy culture in Sud-Kivu since colonial times based on oral tradition; it describes the current ‘cavy status’ in the country and identifies research and capacity building needs. We suggest that cavy culture in DRC is likely to become more widespread and important due to the activities of a new project on ‘Harnessing husbandry of domestic cavy for alternative and rapid access to food and income in Cameroon and the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo’. Given the dimension, cavies should be included in livestock census as well as research and development agenda, honoring their role in the livelihoods of less endowed people, especially women. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamics and constraints of livestock production systems in Cam Giang district, Hai Duong Province, North Vietnam
Han Quang, Hanh ULg; Vu Dinh, Ton; Lebailly, Philippe ULg

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2013), 25(9),

In Northern Vietnam, the livestock production sector has been strongly encouraged to develop by the government for many years as an important livelihood strategy to alleviate household poverty. Over the ... [more ▼]

In Northern Vietnam, the livestock production sector has been strongly encouraged to develop by the government for many years as an important livelihood strategy to alleviate household poverty. Over the last few decades, it has been developed quickly, but remained unsustainable. This study aims to identify the dynamics of livestock production systems during the economic transformation period and their current constraints as the basic for setting up sustainable development policies. A survey, which is based on participatory and retrospective approaches, was conducted at 38 households in two communes of Hai Duong province in 2010. The results indicated a significant evolution of livestock production systems from a traditional small-scale production system into a specialized intensive one due to the land law and the rice land conversion program in 1990s and the industrialization and urbanization process in 2000s. The intensification of livestock production system, which is accompanied by the increasing dependence on imported inputs and the limited knowledge and skills in adequate techniques and disease management, poses a huge difficulty to producers in developing their livestock production systems. Therefore, the priority of development policies should be given to the promotion of the local resource utilisation as feed for animals and to the improvement of farmers’ ability to manage their production through not only government supports but also participation of social organisations and farmers. [less ▲]

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See detailAviculture familiale au Bas-Congo, République Démocratique du Congo (RDC)
Moula, Nassim ULg; Detiffe, Nicolas; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2012), 24(5),

La République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) souffre, à l’instar d’une majorité de pays africains, d’une précarité alimentaire conséquente. Le développement du secteur de l’élevage y est une pièce importante ... [more ▼]

La République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) souffre, à l’instar d’une majorité de pays africains, d’une précarité alimentaire conséquente. Le développement du secteur de l’élevage y est une pièce importante de la stratégie de lutte contre cette insécurité alimentaire, par l’apport de protéines de haute qualité aux populations pauvres ainsi que plus globalement par la création de richesses et la diversification du secteur agricole. A ce titre, le secteur avicole offre incontestablement, par son cycle de production court, une solution rapide et abordable par le plus grand nombre. Cette étude aborde les contraintes à la production de la poule locale au Bas-Congo. Plusieurs facteurs y sont identifiés, tels que les pathologies, l’alimentation, l’habitat et les prédateurs. L’amélioration de la situation économique et nutritionnelle des paysans de la Province du Bas-Congo peut être envisagée en améliorant le potentiel de production des poulets de race locale. Afin d’y arriver, une attention particulière doit être accordée à une alimentation équilibrée et une meilleure conduite générale de l’élevage, incluant un accès aux soins vétérinaires. L’amélioration génétique des races locales est également une voie envisageable, pour autant que l’adéquation entre l’animal et le cadre de son élevage soit respectée. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of redworms (Perionyx excavatus) to manage agricultural wastes and supply valuable feed for poultry
Vu, Dinh Ton; Han Quang, Hanh ULg; Nguyen, Dinh Linh et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2009), 21(number 11), 192

Perionyx excavatus, cultured in Vietnam in early 1990s, showed an important role in managing organic wastes and supplying a very nutritious feed for animals. To develop vermiculture in practice, four ... [more ▼]

Perionyx excavatus, cultured in Vietnam in early 1990s, showed an important role in managing organic wastes and supplying a very nutritious feed for animals. To develop vermiculture in practice, four treatments of different substrates including 100% fresh cattle manure (CM); cattle manure + pig manure in 50:50 ratio (CPM); cattle manure + pig manure + rice straw in 50:40:10 ratio (CPMRS) and pig manure + rice straw in 90:10 ratio (PMRS) were prepared to examine worms’ growth and their decomposition efficiency. All substrates were composted 45 days before feeding to worms. The result showed that cattle manure (CM) was the best substrate for worm growth (biomass gained 713 g after 45 days or 242.6% of growth rate). The worm biomass achieved in CPMRS and PMRS treatments was significantly lower than that in CM treatment. As compared to primary substrates, vermicomposts exhibited an excellent result with a great increase in the amount of total P (0.3 – 0.6%), total K (0.09 – 0.23%), Ca (0.51 – 0.79%) and a decrease in N-NH3 and N-NH4+. A study was carried out to evaluate the influence of feed supplemented with worms on the growth and meat quality of broiler chickens (n=148). Starting at 4 weeks old the chickens were divided into a control group and three experimental groups corresponding to worm levels in the diet of 1, 1.5 and 2% on a dry matter basis according to a completely randomized design. Chicken fed the diet supplemented with 2% worms had the highest live weight at 10 weeks (1925 g/head vs 1823 g/head for the control). Percentage of breast and leg meat was also higher than in the control group. Chickens in the three worm groups had better FCR. The different levels of red worm supplementation did not affect meat quality (pH, color, and the rate of dehydration after storage and processing). [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonal changes in chemical composition and in vitro gas production of six plants from Eastern Algerian arid regions
Haddi, Mlaid; Arab, H.; Yacoub, F. et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2009), 21

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See detailComparaison des caractéristiques de production de la pintade locale (Meleagris numida) en station et dans le milieu villageois en zone soudano-guinéenne du Bénin
Dahouda, Mahamadou; Sènou, Marcel; Toléba, Seibou Soumanou et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2008), 20(12),

A survey on the production characteristics of guinea fowl (Meleagris numida) was carried out in the Borgou department located in the soudano-guinean zone North-Est of Benin. Chicks and reproductive groups ... [more ▼]

A survey on the production characteristics of guinea fowl (Meleagris numida) was carried out in the Borgou department located in the soudano-guinean zone North-Est of Benin. Chicks and reproductive groups were kept either on station under improved management conditions or in rural environment. In rural environment, the birds were divided in two groups. The birds pertaining to the first group were treated against parasitic diseases, whereas those in the second one (control group) received no treatment. Under station conditions, the feed conversion ratio and the daily weight gain were 8.8 and 5.7 g/day respectively. Mean body weight at six months of age were 1151g and 1085g for males and females, respectively. Sexual maturity was reached at 36 weeks of age. For mature hens kept on station, laying rate and the mean egg weight were 37.2% (65% at the peak) and 41.1g respectively. Smothering, stress and pricking were the major constraints to the cloistering of guinea fowl. In rural environment, the mean hatchability rate was 70%. Mortality rate and adult body weight were not significantly different between groups. Mortality rate observed in the rural environment was 50% for both treated or untreated birds. Apart from the parasitic affections, the main causes of mortality were the rain, the predators, the cold and the fragility of chicks. The mean body weight at six months of age is higher for the birds raised under village conditions in comparison to the birds kept on station. [less ▲]

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