References of "Journal of Sleep Research"
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See detailSleep homeostasis and the circadian timing system set the dynamics and excitability of neuronal ensembles
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014, September 14), Suppl

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See detailAge-dependent non-visual effects of a moderately bright light exposure during 40 hours of extended wakefulness.
Gabel, Virginie; Maire, Micheline; Reichert, Carolin et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014, September), Volume 23(Suppl.1), 174-175

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See detailSleep-loss related decrements in night-time vigilance performance: Cerebral correlates and the impact of genetic vulnerability
Maire, Micheline; Reichert, Carolin; Gabel, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014, September), 23(Suppl.1), 10

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See detailImpact of sleep pressure, circadian phase and the ADA polymorphism on cerebral correlates underlying working memory performance
Reichert, Carolin; Maire, Micheline; Gabel, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014, September), 23(Suppl.1), 10

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See detailBlue blocker glasses as a countermeasure for alerting effects of evening LED - screen exposure in teenagers
Van der Lely, Stéphanie; Frey, Silvia; Wirz-Justice, Anna et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014, September), 23(Suppl.1), 178

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See detailBright light therapy in restless legs syndrome: a doubleblind, placebo-controlled study
Kilic-Huck, Ulker; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Ruppert, Elisabeth et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014, September), 23

Medications often partially alleviate the symptoms of RLS patients, emphasizing the need for finding alternative treatments. Recent studies reported an efficacy of bright light therapy (BLT) in Parkinson ... [more ▼]

Medications often partially alleviate the symptoms of RLS patients, emphasizing the need for finding alternative treatments. Recent studies reported an efficacy of bright light therapy (BLT) in Parkinson disease. RLS pathogenesis involves the dopaminergic system and light has been shown to influence the dopaminergic tone. Therefore, the objective of our study was to determine the therapeutic value of three weeks of BLT on RLS symptoms severity, sleep quality, daytime somnolence, circadian rhythms and mood. [less ▲]

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See detailIndividual differences in the non-image frroming effects of light on human sleep.
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Viola, Antoine; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014, September)

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), 23(1), 61

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods: Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5; 20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent 42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memory task in 13 successive fMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results: We tested for a group (PER3 5/5 > PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the fi rst evening WMZ (i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40 h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative to PER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responses in the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions: These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences were observed in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of circadian phase and prior wakefulness on cognition-related cerebral activity in humans
Reichert, Carolin; Maire, Micheline; Gabel, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), 23(Suppl.1), 29

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See detailMandible behaviour interpretation during wakefulness, sleep and sleep-disordered breathing
Maury, Gisèle; Senny, Frédéric; CAMBRON, Laurent ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), (23), 709-716

The mandible movement (MM) signal provides information on mandible activity. It can be read visually to assess sleep–wake state and respiratory events. This study aimed to assess (1) the training of ... [more ▼]

The mandible movement (MM) signal provides information on mandible activity. It can be read visually to assess sleep–wake state and respiratory events. This study aimed to assess (1) the training of independent scorers to recognize the signal specificities; (2) intrascorer reproducibility and (3) interscorer variability. MM was collected in the mid-sagittal plane of the face of 40 patients. The typical MM was extracted and classified into seven distinct pattern classes: active wakefulness (AW), quiet wakefulness or quiet sleep (QW/S), sleep snoring (SS), sleep obstructive events (OAH), sleep mixed apnea (MA), respiratory related arousal (RERA) and sleep central events (CAH). Four scorers were trained; their diagnostic capacities were assessed on two reading sessions. The intra- and interscorer agreements were assessed using Cohen’s j. Intrascorer reproducibility for the two sessions ranged from 0.68 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.59–0.77] to 0.88 (95% CI: 0.82–0.94), while the between-scorer agreement amounted to 0.68 (95% CI: 0.65–0.71) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.72–0.77), respectively. The overall accuracy of the scorers was 75.2% (range: 72.4–80.7%). CAH MMs were the most difficult to discern (overall accuracy 65.6%). For the two sessions, the recognition rate of abnormal respiratory events (OAH, CAH, MA and RERA) was excellent: the interscorer mean agreement was 90.7% (Cohen’s j: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.79–0.88). The discrimination of OAH, CAH, MA characteristics was good, with an interscorer agreement of 80.8% (Cohen’s j: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.62–0.68). Visual analysis of isolated MMs can successfully diagnose sleep–wake state, normal and abnormal respiration and recognize the presence of respiratory effort. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep stabilizes visuomotor adaptation memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study
Albouy, Geneviève ULg; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2013), 22(2), 144-54

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See detailAcute exposure to evening blue-enriched light impacts on human sleep
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Steiner, Roland; Oelhafen, Peter et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2013)

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See detailSleep pressure and a PER3 polymorphism affect blood pressure in healthy young people
Viola, Antoine; Reichert, Carolin; Maire, Micheline et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012, September), 21(Suppl.1), 81

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See detailAge effects on spectral electroencephalogram activity prior to dream recall.
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Munch, Mirjam; Knoblauch, Vera et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(3), 247-56

Ageing is associated with marked changes in sleep timing, structure and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Older people exhibit less slow-wave and spindle activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM ... [more ▼]

Ageing is associated with marked changes in sleep timing, structure and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Older people exhibit less slow-wave and spindle activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, together with attenuated levels of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as compared to young individuals. However, the extent to which these age-related changes in sleep impact on dream processing remains largely unknown. Here we investigated NREM and REM sleep EEG activity prior to dream recall and no recall in 17 young (20-31 years) and 15 older volunteers (57-74 years) during a 40 h multiple nap protocol. Dream recall was assessed immediately after each nap. During NREM sleep prior to dream recall, older participants displayed higher frontal EEG delta activity (1-3 Hz) and higher centro-parietal sigma activity (12-15 Hz) than the young volunteers. Conversely, before no recall, older participants had less frontal-central delta activity and less sigma activity in frontal, central and parietal derivations than the young participants. REM sleep was associated to age-related changes, such that older participants had less frontal-central alpha (10-12 Hz) and beta (16-19 Hz) activity, irrespective of dream recall and no recall. Our data indicate that age-related differences in dream recall seem to be directly coupled to specific frequency and topography EEG patterns, particularly during NREM sleep. Thus, the spectral correlates of dreaming can help to understand the cortical pathways of dreaming. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of acute sleep loss on the neural correlates of alerting, orientating and executive attention components
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(6), 648-58

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See detailAcute exposure to blue-enriched light impacts on melatonin and sleep in humans
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Steiner, Roland; Oelhafen, Peter et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012)

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See detailLight impact on cognitive brain function depends on circadian phase, sleep pressure and PER3 polymorphism
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(Suppl. 1),

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See detailSleepy metabolites: sleep-related changes in the human Metabolome
Dallmann, Robert; Schmidt, Christina ULg; Tarokh, Leila et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(Suppl.1), 38

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See detailThe interaction of homeostatic and circadian regulation of sleepiness depends on a PER3 polymorphism
Maire, Micheline; Reichert, Carolin; Gabel, Virginie et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2012), 21(Suppl.1), 79

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