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See detailJanet Frame in East-West Encounters
Gabrielle, Cindy ULg

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2012)

Through a close scrutiny of Janet Frame’s life and work, it is my intention in this essay to suggest that Buddhism proved an irresistible magnet for the author’s inquisitive spirit and that it played an ... [more ▼]

Through a close scrutiny of Janet Frame’s life and work, it is my intention in this essay to suggest that Buddhism proved an irresistible magnet for the author’s inquisitive spirit and that it played an important part in the shaping of her poetics. In effect, we shall see under what circumstances Frame’s encounter with the East took place and the extent to which notions such as the empirical mind or knowledge, the Great Death of the ego and the non-duality of the world permeate her oeuvre. The underlying concern in the second part of the essay shall be to buttress the claim that Frame constantly seeks ways through which the infinite and the other can be approached, but not corrupted, by the perceiving self, and that she found in the Buddhist epistemology a pathway towards such alterity. Thus, against the grain of mainstream criticism which maintains that one cannot explore “beyond,” a Buddhist navigation of Frame’s texts leads one to the surprising notion that the unharnessed world (or the infinite) which human beings are unable to embrace is, so to speak, right under their nose so that, between ‘this’ world of limited perceptions and ‘that’ world of the beyond, the boundary is as thick or as thin as the walls of a self-made conceptual prison. [less ▲]

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See detailRace and antiracism in black British and British Asian literature
Ledent, Bénédicte ULg

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2012), 48(4), 460-461

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See detailPossessed by Whiteness: Interracial Affiliations and Racial Melancholia in Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2012), 48(4), 396-405

Drawing on whiteness studies and psychoanalytical theory, this article explores representations of interracial relationships as a means to claim and/or contest the ideal of whiteness in Mohsin Hamid’s The ... [more ▼]

Drawing on whiteness studies and psychoanalytical theory, this article explores representations of interracial relationships as a means to claim and/or contest the ideal of whiteness in Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist. In Hamid’s novel, the 9/11 attacks trigger a crisis in self-identification for model-minority Pakistani protagonist Changez, which proves illuminating in terms of the invisible racial subjugation exerted so far upon him by Jim, Changez’s passport into the corporate world, and by Erica, his (white) lifeline to exclusive Manhattan. The article focuses on the ways in which Hamid uses the post 9/11 context to reveal the racial melancholia surreptitiously informing today’s “new” versions of the American Dream, which is apparent in Changez’s and Erica’s relationship as well as in their parallel impossible mourning of the broken mirror of “white” Am/Erica. Emphasizing the extent to which whiteness and racial melancholia permeate the discourse of assimilation, Hamid’s book rewrites the “new” American Dream as what Anne Anlin Cheng has called a “fantasy built on absences”. [less ▲]

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See detailReview of Frameworks: Contemporary Criticism on Janet Frame, ed. by Jan Cronin & Simone Drichel
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2011), 47(3), 362-363

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See detailThe Poetics of Dissolution: The Representation of Maori Culture in Janet Frame’s Fiction
Gabrielle, Cindy ULg

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2010), 46(2), 209-220

This essay examines Janet Frame’s early short story “The Lagoon”, and argues that the story alludes to Maori experience, albeit tangentially, in a way which anticipates similar evocations in novels such ... [more ▼]

This essay examines Janet Frame’s early short story “The Lagoon”, and argues that the story alludes to Maori experience, albeit tangentially, in a way which anticipates similar evocations in novels such as A State of Siege and The Carpathians. A close reading shows that cultural imperialism in Frame runs parallel to, or is a side-effect of, interpersonal appropriations. These, in turn, seem to be rooted in human beings’ reluctance to accommodate otherness. Recurrently Janet Frame points to a model of cultural and interpersonal interaction which is detached from proprietorial forms of appropriation, but which entails nothing less than the dissolution of the ruling ego. Selfdissolution shall emerge in this reading as the key to a utopian state consisting of the total permeability between the self and the remainder of the world. In this state, transactions become reciprocal since the divisions between self and non-self no longer exist. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Legacy of Invention: Determinism and Metafiction in Janet Frame's Mona Minim and the Smell of the Sun
Delrez, Marc ULg

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2009), 45(1),

This essay offers a close reading of Mona Minim and the Smell of the Sun, a tale for children often thought to be unique in the corpus of Janet Frame in that its implied reading public compelled the ... [more ▼]

This essay offers a close reading of Mona Minim and the Smell of the Sun, a tale for children often thought to be unique in the corpus of Janet Frame in that its implied reading public compelled the author to keep her distance from her usual preoccupation with the great negative themes of twentieth-century consciousness. Yet Frame’s declaration in an interview that this was her favourite among her own published books should alert us to the possibility that thematic continuities subterraneously connect it to the rest of the work. In particular, the exploration of animal life encouraged by the genre can be seen to be paradigmatic of her interest in alternative ontologies and to encode the concern with creativity which is a touchstone of her entire output. Typically, too, the figure of the artist – in this case, of the story-teller – is invested with a redemptive value for the beleaguered individual, and cannot be separated from a metafictional mode of representation which is possibly unexpected in what purports to be a simple fairy tale. [less ▲]

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See detailPaying Attention to Language, Replicas and the Role of the Artist in Janet Frame's Living in the Maniototo
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2006), 42(1), 32-43

Janet Frame's 1979 novel Living in the Maniototo features a ubiquitous narrator whose multiple personalities are linked by a common interest in creation. This choice of narrative perspective, coupled with ... [more ▼]

Janet Frame's 1979 novel Living in the Maniototo features a ubiquitous narrator whose multiple personalities are linked by a common interest in creation. This choice of narrative perspective, coupled with the characters and events depicted in the book, provides the basis for an exploration of the related concepts of art, language and replicas. By establishing connections between these elements, this article attempts to unveil the dynamics at work in the novel's multi-layered structure and thus shed light on the role of the artist in the narrative and, by extension, on the author's metafictional strategy. [less ▲]

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