References of "Journal of Population Economics"
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See detailUnited but (un)equal: human capital, probability of divorce, and the marriage contract
Cremer, Helmuh; Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Roeder, Kerstin

in Journal of Population Economics (2014)

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See detailHow powerful is demography? The Serendipity Theorem revisited
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; de la Croix, David; Ponthiere, Gregory

in Journal of Population Economics (2012), 25

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See detailIncome taxation of couples and the tax unit choice
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Cremer, H., Lozachmeur, J-M.

in Journal of Population Economics (2011)

We study the optimal income taxation of couples. We determine the resulting intra-family labor supply allocation and its implication for the choice of the tax unit (individual versus joint taxation). We ... [more ▼]

We study the optimal income taxation of couples. We determine the resulting intra-family labor supply allocation and its implication for the choice of the tax unit (individual versus joint taxation). We provide a general condition for full joint taxation to arise. We also study how the spouses’ respective labor supply decisions are distorted when the condition does not hold. In particular, we show that, depending on the pattern of mating, the celebrated result according to which the spouse with the more elastic labor supply faces the lower marginal tax rates may or may not hold in our setting. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimal linear taxation under endogenous longevity
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Leroux, ML; Ponthiere, Gregory

in Journal of Population Economics (2011), 24

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See detailPensions with heterogenous individuals and endogenous fertility
Cremer, Helmuth; Gahvari, Firouz; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Population Economics (2006), (21), 961-981

This paper studies the design of pension schemes in a society where fertility is endogenous and parents differ in their ability to raise children. In a world with perfect information, a pay-as-you-go ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the design of pension schemes in a society where fertility is endogenous and parents differ in their ability to raise children. In a world with perfect information, a pay-as-you-go social security system is characterized by equal pensions for all but different contributions which may or may not increase with the number of children. Additionally, fertility must be subsidized at the margin to correct for the externality that accompanies fertility. In a world of asymmetric information, incentiverelated distortions supplement the Pigouvian subsidy. These may either require an additional subsidy or an offsetting tax on fertility depending on whether the redistribution is towards people with more or less children. In the former case, pensions are decreasing in the number of children; in the latter case, they are increasing. [less ▲]

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See detailFamily size and optimal income taxation
Cremer, Helmuth; Dellis, Arnaud; Pestieau, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Population Economics (2003), 16(1), 37-54

This paper studies the role of family size in the design of optimal income taxation. We consider a second best setting where the government observes the number of children and the income of the parents ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the role of family size in the design of optimal income taxation. We consider a second best setting where the government observes the number of children and the income of the parents but not their productivity. With a linear tax schedule the marginal tax rate is shown to decrease with the number of children, while the relationship between the demogrant and family size appears to be ambiguous. With two ability levels, optimal non-linear income tax implies zero marginal tax rates for the higher ability parents; low ability parents have positive marginal tax rates that decrease with family size. [less ▲]

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See detailComparing measures of poverty and relative deprivation: an example for Belgium
Delhausse, Bernard; Luttgens, Axel; Perelman, Sergio ULg

in Journal of Population Economics (1993), 6

This paper presents three different poverty standards. A first approach takes the disposable income as an indicator of poverty. A second approach uses the Leyden approach. Finally an aggregate index of ... [more ▼]

This paper presents three different poverty standards. A first approach takes the disposable income as an indicator of poverty. A second approach uses the Leyden approach. Finally an aggregate index of deprivation, based on the observation of consumption events, is constructed through a particular econometric procedure proposed by Desai and Shah (1988). These alternative measures are then compared on a sample composed of 6380 Belgian households. Such an analysis can be expected to provide some further insight into the problem of measuring poverty, which has been the subject of a recent controversial debate. [less ▲]

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See detailInheritance and wealth composition
Pestieau, Pierre ULg; Perelman, Sergio ULg

in Journal of Population Economics (1992), (5), 305-318

This paper studies the effects of variables pertaining to alternative bequest motives on the composition of households' portofolio. It relies on a 1986 survey on the assets structure of 5600 French ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the effects of variables pertaining to alternative bequest motives on the composition of households' portofolio. It relies on a 1986 survey on the assets structure of 5600 French households. The main conclusion is that bequest motives indeed influence the composition of households' wealth. However, available data does not allow one to sort out the influence of specific models of inheritance. [less ▲]

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